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  1. rr888

    Dilute For Bleeding?

    Hi All, Fountain pen newbie here with some questions on ink. I am experiencing bleeding on inks that most people do not have bleeding problems with. Specifically, Diamine Majestic Blue, De Atramentis Magenta Violet and Rohrer & Klingner Cassia. I am using a Leuchtturm 1917. I have read different articles about dilution but several ink reviews for these inks do not mention any bleeding problems. I have added a photo of the reverse side of a Majestic Blue list and a ink sample page. When I first started using Noodler's Black, I had problems with "ink transfer" (not sure if there is a term for this). Dried ink on one page A would transfer to another page B (Page A and B are faces of a notebook A|B where | is the spine) when I wrote on the reverse side of page B. A little dilution got rid of this problem but the problem comes back when the ink starts to dry. Using ink seems pretty intuitive... Take ink from bottle, put in pen, write. Am I doing this wrong? Why am I having so many problems? Should I be diluting all of these inks? I know Rhodia paper handles ink better but I would like to find a solution that works with the Leuchtturm -- which should still be able to handle fountain pens! Thank you!!!
  2. Ink Review : Diamine Schubert (Music Collection) Pen : Lamy AL-Star, M-nib Paper : Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm Review Vienna, autumn of 1821, banks of the Danube river Greetings wanderer, my name is Franz Peter Schubert and I am enjoying my afternoon walk along the banks of our famous Danube river. Thunderclouds are gathering and the sky is gleaming with a magical light, that colours the river a deep green-blue. This setting inspires my muse - I've got an idea for a wonderfully complex piece. I think I'll call it "Wanderer Fantasy". In 2015 Diamine released the Music Collection, a set of ten subdued and seriuous-looking inks named after well-known composers. In this review, we take a closer look at Schubert - after the above introduction, you're sure to remember that this is a green-blue ink. Diamine Schubert fits in the spectrum of blue-green colours, but leans heavily towards the green side. Personally, I find it a rather dreary colour that's not really to my taste - dirty riverwater indeed ;-) Me, I like my blue-greens more on the bluish side, like Iroshizuku ku-jaku or Pelikan Edelstein Aquamarine. In broader nibs, the ink looks more lively and exhibits more shading. But still, this colour is not really my thing. OK - but how does it behave on paper ? For this, I did some tests: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time 15-20 seconds, no feathering, no show-through nor bleed-through.Paperblanks journal paper - drying time 10-15 seconds, no feathering, no show-through and no bleed-through. Looks better on this off-white paper.Generic notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time ~10 seconds, no feathering, no show-through, bleed-through only on the ink-swab.Moleskine journal - drying time ~5 seconds ! No feathering, significant show-through and bleed-through.Tomoe River paper - drying time ~20 seconds, no feathering, some show-through, no bleed through (with the exception of minimal bleed-through on the ink-swab).Original Crown Mill cotton paper - drying time ~10 seconds, no feathering, no show-through and no bleed-through.Technically, Schubert does really well on a wide variety of paper, and even behaves on the lower quality ones. In a Moleskine journal, it is perfectly usable if you use only one side of the page. In my opinion, the ink looks nicer on off-white, more yellowish paper. On white paper, I'm not a fan of the colour. The ink is reasonably smudge-resistant, and exhibits a fair water-resistance. Even after 30 seconds of running tap-water, I still had no difficulty reading what remains. On the 15 minute droplet test, the ink did behave poorly - in this case the text has all but vanished. Conclusion Diamine Schubert is a well-behaving ink on a broad range of paper, and has a fairly OK water resistance. Technically - I see nothing wrong with this ink. But for a teal ink, I personally find it too green for my taste. The resulting colour is not to my liking. In my opinion, blue-greens only look nice when they are closer to the blue side of the spectrum. my overall score: B
  3. Hello, FP friends. My wife gave me a bottle of Diamine Shimmertastic "Purple Pazzazz" for my birthday. I'd heard these inks can be finicky, so I didn't want to load it into one of my existing pens, all of which are unusual fillers or finer nibs. So, I bought a Kaweco Classic demonstrator with a broad nib, since it was inexpensive and I thought it would be neat as an eyedropper loaded with this shimmery ink. I loaded the pen, and I have to say the experience has been disappointing. Initially, there was good distribution of the gold fleck onto the written page, at least for the first few letters in a sentence. Giving the pen a gentle shake would help "recharge" the fleck, and I could get a few more letters with shimmer. That was fine, as I really didn't expect this to be for everyday writing anyway. However, now I get no gold fleck at all. no matter how I shake, rattle and roll the pen before writing. There's still gold fleck in the barrel, but none comes out of the nib in writing. It's just purple. Any idea what might be wrong? I'm going to disassemble and clean the pen, but figured I'd ask. Did I choose the wrong pen for this shimmery ink? Thanks!
  4. In 2015 Diamine released the Music Collection, a set of ten inks named after well-known composers. This is a collection with serious, subdued colors. The package is conceived as a gift set, with a nice presentation box included. Reviews for individual inks from this set can be found elsewhere on this forum, and a nice color presentation of the complete set can be found in "Diamine Music Set : Ten Dreary Colors". Here I add some additional information - for one thing a set of chroma's for these inks. This gives you an idea of the ink's complexity and number of dyes used in its composition. You also get an idea of the ink's water resistance. The more water soluble dyes are found at the top of the chromatography - the water-resistent parts at the bottom. The bottom of the picture gives a good idea of what remains of the ink when exposing it to water. And these chromatographies are also just nice-looking representations of the ink's character. Enjoy... The ink colors from this set are indeed "dreary", seriously subdued, and maybe a bit bland. But I recently tried them on some high-quality paper, and noticed that their looks depend very much on the paper. Specifically - on "Original Crown Mill cotton paper" these inks get a really nice classy look. For some reason, this paper gives the inks a huge boost in character. Really really nice. It is the first time I used this paper, but that will definitely change ! Below you can see a blow-up of the difference on paper between "Original Crown Mill" and "Tomoe River". These inks are absolutely OK on Tomoe River, but the cotton paper of Original Crown Mill definitely enhances the inks aesthetics. I also tried the inks on a more creamy paper in a Life Noble notebook. This more yellowish paper is definitely not a good partner for these inks. It makes the subdued colors look bland. For these inks, you should stick to white paper. Below you'll find the images for the ink overview on the three different papers: Original Crown Mill, Tomoe River and Life Noble. The Music Collection Set on Original Crown Mill Cotton Paper The Music Collection Set on Tomoe River Paper The Music Collection Set on Life Noble Notebook paper
  5. I've had this ink for a few months now. I use it in my Cross Bailey. I was very excited about its color when looking at pictures, but I was immediately disappointed upon seeing that the ink was almost copper or blood like. I still like this ink, but is this just how I'm seeing it or is it because of the lighting and/or pen I'm using? Do any of you all feel the same? (Note: I tried taking pictures but they look different from how it looks in real life (it looks redder and brighter) so I'm not including them)
  6. visvamitra

    Oxford Blue - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx Oxford Blue is one of two new inks in Diamine line. I enjoy the color and the writing experience. It's well behaved and the color is quite intriguing. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Water resistance
  7. lgsoltek

    Diamine Flower Set

    Currently Diamine has two box sets of inks: the Music Set and the Flower Set. Visvamitra has a great comparison of the former. Personally I find the Music Set colours too gloomy. I prefer the bright colours of the Flower Set. Check out the following links for my individual review of these 10 inks: AsterBougainvilleaBurgundy RoseCarnationCornflowerGerberaIrisMarigoldPansyTulipBox The inks come in a sturdy box, separated by some cheap-looking black paper. Sometimes it's very difficult to take out one bottle because it's too tight. Labels Each label features an image of the corresponding flower. Splash Scanned images. Now to writing samples. Except stated otherwise, they are all written with a Pilot Elabo/Falcon Soft Medium. Samples (On Maruman Looseleaf) (On Rhodia Dotpad) (On some cheap no-name notebook paper) Now with dip pen nibs. With a lot of ink put on paper, the colours are richer and show more sheen. (Speedball 3mm nib, on Maruman Looseleaf) (Speedball, on Tomoe River white paper) (Speedball 3mm and Zebra G, on Tomoe River ivory paper) (Folded nib, on Maruman Looseleaf) Sheen (Photo taken in sunlight, from the Tomoe River ivory paper sample.) Water Resistance (before: Maruman Looseleaf) (after) Comparison (with some similar (or not) colours) To conclude My impression of these inks in short: Aster: too pale in writing for my taste, but decent for dipping. Bougainvillea: I love how bright it is. Burgundy Rose: decent. Carnation: a freaky and weird colour with strange sheen, love it. Cornflower: an okay blue with quite a lot of sheen, stains! Gerbera: nice shading, a bit dry for my taste (?) Iris: lovely blurple, stains. Marigold: not bad, but somewhat dry (?) Pansy: rich purple, love it, except that it stains. Tulip: meh, not saturated enough. I love: Bougainvillea, Carnation, Pansy, Iris. I don't like: Tulip, Aster. The rest are ok.
  8. Ink Review : Diamine Mozart (Music Collection) Pen: Lamy Al-Star, M-nib Paper : Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm Review Vienna countryside, summer of 1788 A hot late-summer afternoon just after a refreshing shower. Farmers in the red-brown freshly plowed fields. A friendly wrestling match between two young men trying to impress their lovers. Yey ! Mudfight. How hilarious ! This setting inspires my muse. I've got a splendid idea for a comical opera buffa with lovers as a theme - I think I will call it "Cosi Fan Tutte." In 2015 Diamine released the Music Collection, a set of ten inks named after well-known composers. This is a collection with serious, subdued colors. In this review, we take a look at Mozart - after the above discussion, you're sure to remember that this is a red-brown ink. Diamine Mozart is a nice red-brown ink, almost pinkish red-brown as shown in the chromatography. This ink writes well, with good flow, and exhibits some nice shading. Looks real good in broader nibs where the shading is more pronounced, and where the red-brown color shows its best. In finer nibs though, I find that the ink looks rather bland and uninspiring. Because of my small handwriting I typically use the finer nibs, so this Mozart is not really my thing. OK - but how does it behave on paper ? For this, I did some tests: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time 20-25 seconds, no feathering, no show-through and no bleed-through. Nice-looking on this white paperPaperblanks journal paper - drying time 10-15 seconds, no feathering, some minor show-through, no bleed-through. Looks more reddish on this more yellowish paperGeneric notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time 10-15 seconds, no feathering, no show-through nor bleed-throughMoleskine journal - drying time ~5 seconds, no feathering, significant show-through and bleed-through. Looks more reddish on this off-white paperMozart is a well-behaving ink on a wide variety of paper. Personally I like it best on pure white paper. On off-white, more yellowish paper, it looks really red. Too red for my taste. The ink is smudge resistant, but totally not water-resistant. Short exposure to water leaves a reddish residue that remains more or less readable. After a longer soak, the text is gone and only red-brown mudstains remain. Conclusion Diamine Mozart is a well-behaving ink with good flow, that tolerates a wide variety of paper. Even Moleskine journals are OK if you use only one side of the pages. A shame about the complete lack of water-resistance though. The color - as always - is a personal thing. Myself, I'm not a fan of this Mozart. It's a bit too red for my tastes. But if you like red-brown inks, this Mozart might just be your thing. my overall score : B
  9. jtruten

    Diamine Music Set

    Dear Fountain Pen Network, I wanted to start a thread about the Diamine Music Set because there are so few writing sample pictures of it on the internet and I wanted to put some out there. My friend just bought the set from the wonderful La Couronne du Comte and generously gave me samples of each of them, and so far I am hugely impressed. I'm attaching pictures of the Strauss ink, which I loaded up in my red Pilot Falcon with a soft medium nib. The paper is a Seven Seas Tomoe River journal. I apologize for the low lighting! I think this ink is absolutely stunning, and obviously on this paper the shading is outstanding. There is even a hint of sheen on areas with a lot of ink laid down. I would love to hear what you think of it or if you have any pictures of your own of the Diamine Music Set! Thanks so much, Julia
  10. The wonderful and widely known Diamine Autumn Oak. This ink depends HEAVILY on the pen and nib as to how it looks. To me, it reads as a much more "mature" Noodler's Apache Sunset. I absolutely adore this ink and will be buying it when I have the chance to do so! Flow: 8 Lubrication: Written says 6, but I would change to 5. It is a very watery ink and as such the flow is very good but the lubrication is fairly low. Dry Time: 25-30s on Tomoe River paper. Shading: 10! Bleedthrough: None Ghosting: Not too bad. Color: Written says 7, change it to 8. Overall: 7 - I absolutely adore the shading and this more mature orange ink! Written Review: Photos: Scans:
  11. Diamine have announced today that they are almost ready to launch their latest "shimmer" inks. They should be available at the end of September or the beginning of October. They are called Diamine Shimmertastic inks, and each ink will come in a 50ml glass bottle. Each ink contains either silver or gold particles and these are the colours: NIGHT SKY ( Black/Silver) BLUE PEARL ( Blue / Silver) A medium blue shade PURPLE PAZZAZZ (Purple / Gold) MAGICAL FOREST (Green/ Silver) BLUE LIGHTNING (Blue / Silver) A cerulean type blue shade RED LUSTRE (Red / Gold) SHIMMERING SEAS (Blue / Gold) A blue-black shade BRANDY DAZZLE (Brown / Gold) GOLDEN SANDS (Yellow / Gold) SPARKLING SHADOWS ( Grey / Gold) Reviews to follow soon.
  12. visvamitra

    Midnight - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx Midnight is one of my Diamine favourites. It is a moderately saturated dark blue with a hint of indigo. The color is not particularly affected by the color of the paper – it looks well on all of them The darkness is more evident with a medium - broader nibs, and it tends to write a bit more "wide" than when using other inks - no, not feathering, just "fuller" lines. It flows really well and exhibits perfect flow qualities and smoothness.I enjoy the color and the writing experience. It's well behaved and the color is quite intriguing. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Lyreco Budget, Montblanc Generation, M Clairefontaine, Montblanc Generation, M Water resistance
  13. Hi guys, just a quick comparison. DIamine Prussian Blue vs. Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black. In normal pens with "normal" nibs, bothe fine :-) For me, if that would be a blind test, those inks are about the same, DIamine is a bit more wet but the shade is very similar. I am curious what would broader nib do with these.
  14. Anthony95

    In Search Of A Purple

    I have a large collection of ink, but only one purple must be remedied! . The purple I have is waterman, can anyone recommend something with a touch more red? Has anyone used diamine imperial or MB violet? If so do you think these might fit the bill. Any suggestions welcome I'm in the UK so noodlers and PR are harder to procure. Thank ye all
  15. visvamitra

    Florida Blue - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx Florida Blue ink writes clean and clear, and flows well in most pens. Never too wet. Never to dry. It's good ink. Not particularly thrilling but well behaved. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Oxford - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B
  16. visvamitra

    Evergreen - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx I must say I enjoy Evergreen. I'm surprised by the color though. I was expecting this ink to be darker. The flow is good as long as you use the pen frequently. However if you leave this ink in unused pen for some time it tends to cause hard/start and clog the feed. I've observed it in Waterman hemisphere. After three days of not using the pen I needed to dip the nib in the water to unblock the flow. A part from that it's rather well behaved ink with nice shading and no feathering. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco Sport Classic, eyedropper, B
  17. Ink Review : Diamine Safari (150th Anniversary Ink) Pen: Lamy Safari, M-nib Paper: Rhodia N° 16 notepad 80 gsm Review This ink is part of an 8-ink bottle collection released by Diamine to celebrate their 150th anniversary (1864-2014). It is one of the more interesting colors from this set. Safari... the name evokes images of the African savannah... a proud lion gnawing at the bones of a freshly killed antelope. A ranger in a khaki uniform - blending in with the tall grass and bushes - observing the scene... The color captures the spirit of the savannah well. It's kind of a dark yellow-green, khaki-like color, resembling the yellow-green grass and bushes of the lush grassland. It's a color with character, not dull at all, but at the same time traditional enough to be used in the workplace (e.g. for taking meeting notes - although not really suited for business correspondence). I like the color, not boring and at the same time not an obtrusive color. It keeps you interested, but it doesn't jump in your face. OK - but how does it behave on paper ? For this, I did some tests: Rhodia N° 16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time ~20 seconds, no feathering, no show-through nor bleed-throughPaperblanks journal paper - drying time ~15 seconds, no feathering, no show-through and no bleed-throughGeneric notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time ~15 seconds, no feathering, no show-through, no bleed-throughMoleskine journal - drying time ~10 seconds, no feathering, definitely noticeable show-through, but almost no bleed-throughThe ink behaves surprisingly well, even on Moleskine paper. Keep in mind that I only tested up to a medium nib. With wetter pens, performance on cheap paper will probably worsen. Notice that the ink exhibits a very nice shading. This is something that I really like. The shading catches your attention, but remains subtle and classy. It really shows that you're writing with a fountain pen and not a dull ballpoint. Very well done. Our proud lion - being a big cat - doesn't like water very much. Neither does this ink. Running tap water removes most of the color. However, a greyish trace of your text remains, and is still perfectly readable, even after 30 seconds in running water. Not bad at all ! Conclusion Safari is a very well-behaving ink. You also get an interesting color with some very nice shading. You can even use this ink in the workplace without getting strange looks from your colleagues. Good work from Diamine ! My overall score: A
  18. Ink Review: Diamine Carnival (150th Anniversary Ink) Pen: TWSBI Vac Mini, M-nib Paper: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm Review In 2014 Diamine released their very fine 150th Anniversary Ink collection to commemmorate their 150 year existence (1864-2014). In this review I take a closer look at Carnival - one of my favourite happy inks from this collection. Carnival - it will come as no surprise that the name evokes the image of a warm sweaty evening in Rio De Janeiro. Festive crowds dancing in the streets. Your eyes drawn to some sensual young ladies in a dark red bikini, complemented with a huge feather crown. Happy partying all night long... This ink's name has been chosen well. This is a happy and festive ink. A beautiful shade of dark red. A sensual colour. Definitely not an ink for the workplace, but for use at home in your journal, or for writing that intimate love letter... The ink flows well in the pens I tried it with. And I really, really like the colour. It is a stunning dark red with some purple undertones, as shown in the chromatography. Water resistance is very low. Like rain disperses the partying crowds, even small amounts of water wipe out this ink from the page. Look elsewhere if water resistance is a requirement. OK - but how does this ink behave on paper? For this I did some tests: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time 30-35 seconds, no feathering, no show-through nor bleed-throughPaperblanks journal paper - drying time ~15 seconds, no feathering, no show-through nor bleed-throughGeneric notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time ~15 seconds, no feathering, minimal show-through, almost no bleed-through (except on the spot where I did an ink swab)Moleskine journal - drying time 5-10 seconds, no feathering, noticeable show-through, minimal bleed-through (mostly on the ink swab, and on the dots of the i)This ink behaves surprisingly well on a variety of paper, it's even not too shabby on bad Moleskine paper. Drying times on fountain pen friendly paper are a bit on the long side. For some reason, the ink flows noticeably wetter in my Paperblanks journal - the M-nib looks like a broad on that paper. Overall - a very well-behaving ink. Conclusion For a red ink, you can't go wrong here. I really like this dark red colour. For me, this is a "happy" ink, a festive one as its name implies. Oh... and a tip for you: the ink looks fabulous on off-white, more yellowish paper - on this kind of paper it really shines. I for one am glad to have a bottle of it. my overall score: A+
  19. I wanted to introduce these previously tested but not issued Diamine Shimmer inks in the Inky Thoughts forum because Diamine would like to hear your thoughts on them. Some more Shimmer inks will be introduced into the range, and your ideas would be gratefully received. Please vote for the colour or colours you like, or feel free to suggest your own colour. The first one one is Silver: Then there is Orange: Bright Green: Other writing samples will be added.
  20. NickiStew

    And The Real Magic Begins

    Having committed myself to this project in June, I have tested circa 100 different fountain pens inks, and it’s six months down the line that the investigation is now really starting to pay off. Please click the link to view all images related to this post: https://quinkandbleach.wordpress.com/2015/11/16/and-the-real-magic-begins/ All fountain ink brands contain chemicals within their fluids to: increase paper penetration, minimise spreading and increase drying time. Other than that, each individual product can vary considerably and as shown in previous blogs, the the variations between products are wide ranging. Diamine produce an in-depth range of fountain pen inks made from dyes that when subjected to my water and bleach tests react in a visual way that is both dramatic and intriguing. Very often, the different dyes that make up the ink colour range reveal themselves in the gorgeous water wash blends and the bleach reacts with them in intensity from white or yellow gold to a stunning neon. Noodlers, on the other hand’ are known for creating ‘bulletproof inks’ to minimise fading and to prevent document tampering and forgery. These inks are agent (including bleach) resistant and often demonstrate a degree of resistance to water, which is equally exciting as the inks break down leaving a sediment effect, rather like a watercolour paint, often on top of a feint translucent base colour. What I have done here is lay down a background of Diamine Sunset onto a heavy Bockingford watercolour paper, which washes out a gorgeous range of dark and mid tone reddy browns with pinky reds and yellows. Then, using a Daedalus pen with a Zebra G flex nib I have rendered the illustration and type with the agent resistant Noodlers Lexington Gray. Once dried thoroughly I applied mid strength bleach washes over the illustration which only reacted with the background underneath. The final effect is visually pleasing in many ways as not only has the outcome been achieved using only two inks, adhering to my ethos of ‘less is more’, BUT because of the limited colour palette, the complex final image looks fresh and not overworked. The mottled gold areas where the bleach hasn’t obliterated the background colour add those magical serendipity effects unique to fountain pen inks. The subject matter may not be to everyone’s taste, but the technique is what counts, as I believe it to be unique to fountain pen inks. It’s simple, time efficient and visually dramatic! I am becoming increasingly convinced that fountain pen ink art could and maybe should become a proper genre of its’ own?
  21. I'm reviewing some of my inks. Cult Pens Deep Dark Orange was requested by mmg122 I would call it a dark or burnt orange. It's a very well behaved ink with some shading. I found it flowed smoothly across the page, and had no problems with lubrication in the pen I used. It's a very popular colour because it's a dark orange, and isn't too bright. This ink exhibits no showthrough or bleedthrough on my Tomoe River paper. This paper is slightly thicker than the standard TR paper DDO is a saturated ink and my fingers were stained after washing my hands. The water test on the review form shows this isn't a waterproof ink Bearing in mind the paper I use is smooth, and the nib used at that time was an Italic, this ink took 16-18 secs to dry. It flows through the pen well and lubricates the nib well. I saw no skips or hard starts from the Phileas. It is currently available in Diamine 30ml plastic refill bottles or 80ml glass bottles It's only available from Cult Pens who sell it directly to customers on their web-site.It's a reasonably priced ink
  22. Chrissy

    Ink Review: Diamine Marine

    My latest ink is Diamine Marine As I said in my review for Diamine Havasu Turquoise and Diamine Turquoise I have been collecting turquoise inks and samples since I bought a bottle of Caran d'Ache Caribbean Sea. There are several inks that are a good alternative for that deleted ink and I intend to show you as many as I can. The best match I have found so far is Kaweco Paradise Blue and I will be posting a review of that ink soon. Diamine Marine is another alternative. It's very slightly greener than and has about the same saturation as Havasu Turquoise. It is more like a slightly greenish turquoise ink than a sky blue ink. I'm not sure you would need Marine, Havasu Turquoise and Turquoise in one ink collection though. If someone forced me to choose between D Havasu Turquoise, Turquoise and Marine, so that I could only have one of them in my collection, I would have a real problem choosing between Turquoise and Marine. Marine is spot in the middle of blue and green though. The exact colour that you would describe bright turquoise as. I have previously reviewed Diamine Soft Mint and Diamine Steel Blue ink and at the time I believed Steel Blue might be the closest match to Caran d'Ache Caribbean Sea. However, I think you could choose Diamine Turquoise or Diamine Marine for a closer match. Although this isn't a waterproof ink, it shows good water resistance, as do many turquoise inks.Bearing in mind the paper I use is thick with a shiny surface, and I used a Lamy M nib, this ink took 15-16 secs to dry.It flows through the pen very well and lubricates the nib very well. I saw no skips or hard starts while I did swabs and dry time tests. It was one of those pen and ink moments that produced a great match for me. They really played well together.It is currently available in 80ml glass bottles, 30ml plastic refill bottles or International sized cartridges.Diamine sell it directly to end-users on their web-site.It's a reasonable price.
  23. Hello mein inky friends. Today I have quite the conundrum. I recently received some diamine oxblood, alongside a cross aventura and zebra r301. The ink flows fine in the cross and my old pilot parallel, but my zebra r301, which is supposed to be a broad .8 mm, is putting out a dry line of peachish ink at around .5 mm. I had previously used noodler's bulletproof black without any problems, but I soon found that I did not clean out the r301 well enough and it began writing black. It eventually kept lightening until it became the sickening earthen colour it is now. I thought this was do to leftover water and thought nothing of it, but now the pen writes terribly. I believe it may have been clogged somehow. If so, are there any ways to fix it? Feel free to move this thread if I am in the incorrect section; I did not know which board to post this in, but thought you guys would have the most experience.
  24. Another Oxblood review... http://lh5.ggpht.com/-6Qomou8mdjQ/Uf4YR1LHGXI/AAAAAAAABFk/-yMMqQ6qe6U/Oxblood1.jpg?imgmax=800 Subjective Why I like Oxblood: The sheer depth of bloody colour when laid on thickA dark red that works for markup but also notes and is fairly easy on the eye (if you can stand the sight of blood)Clean up isn't too onerous, unlike a lot of red inkAnother ink that flows and lubricates wellObjective Pens Lamy Safari and Vista with OM, OB and 1.5mm italic nibs. Sheaffer 300 medium. The OM and OB were used in my Evergreen review. The Vista is relatively wet and the Sheaffer is probably the wettest pen I own. Paper Rhodia Bloc No. 16, 5x5 grid. Also a scrap of generic copier paper for showing bleed through. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_r_UhdypLXc/UiMwj97JveI/AAAAAAAABLA/9fjyqRYSmEo/s400/oxblood.jpgLike any ink the wetness of a pen will affect how this ink looks; unlike Evergreen I don't really like the product of a dry writer. The line from the OM nib is an insipid pink rust colour. It really needs a wet nib to do the ink justice. Feathering and Bleeding It more or less holds itself together even from a wet pen on copier paper, and doesn't bleed through badly. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-05ypNYoqloc/UiMwsCVs9NI/AAAAAAAABLI/8McC_jyeUyc/s320/oxblood_copier.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-0qY71LvVIgA/UiMwyYIFG0I/AAAAAAAABLQ/tqQ5vpSOE8M/s320/oxblood_bleed.jpgFlow and Lubrication Superb, with lubrication just a hair less than Evergreen. Very nice. Water Resistance Well... http://lh3.ggpht.com/-uT3nfVt0jGU/UiMwOia97JI/AAAAAAAABKo/6a5RbS3QGSs/Oxblood-rinse1.jpg?imgmax=800 http://lh6.ggpht.com/-gYIUv_Y7zFk/UiMwPG5aDuI/AAAAAAAABKw/b0mJcngQNVM/Oxblood-rinse2.jpg?imgmax=800 http://lh5.ggpht.com/-erLo9zpieCY/UiMwP3KaUUI/AAAAAAAABK4/CVgRDK9iNAE/Oxblood-water.jpg?imgmax=800 Only the wettest lines have any residue. This was after about a minute of running water. Dry lines stand no chance... Cleaning Despite the poor water resistance the ink took a while to flush out completely, but it didn't stain. Generally OK. Summary Everyone seems to love Oxblood. I think it's a great colour but it's not as versatile as Evergreen owing to the performance in dry nibs. For a drier pen I'd choose Red Dragon which is similarly dark but has more character when thinly laid on. But that's just my preference. As Evergreen is my benchmark, here's how Oxblood compares: Flow and Lubrication: as goodVersatility: slightly less due to unremarkable colour in dry pensClean up: slightly harder to remove, but not badWater Resistance: slightly improved, but still very poorVerdict: a very appealing colour that will get regular use in a limited number of pens. Also on my blog.
  25. Ink Review : Diamine 1864 Blue Black (150th Anniversary Ink) Pen: Lamy Logo, F-nib Paper: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm Review In 2014 Diamine released their 150th Anniversary Ink collection, to commemmorate their 150 year existence (1864-2014). In this review I take a closer look at the 1864 Blue Black ink from this collection. 1864 ... the name evokes images of an industrial area in England, factories and smoking chimneys. Children with their dirty faces stirring large cauldrons with ink in the Diamine factory. In the writing room, the clerks at their standing desk use this blue-black ink to maintain the ledger, using utmost care to avoid smudging. This ink is a very dark blue-black, that sure feels 150 years old an not suited for today's fountain pens. The ink is too dark... too wet... it flows like a river out of your pen... too much... too fast... Personally I really dislike this ink. It attacks the paper, tries to dominate it. It doesn't cooperate with the paper like other inks do. This ink reminds me of Sauron and Mordor... an ink for the Dark Empire. The result is pure ugliness... this ink overwhelms the paper, and really jumps in your face in a rather unpleasing way. OK - but how does it behave on paper ? For this, I did some tests: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time ~30 seconds, no noticeable feathering, no show-through and no bleed-throughPaperblanks journal paper - drying time 15-20 seconds, some minor feathering, no show-through and no bleed-throughGeneric notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time ~15 seconds, no noticeable feathering, some show-through , some bleed-throughMoleskine journal - drying time ~5 seconds, noticeable feathering, major show-through and major bleed-throughThis ink had me screaming in frustration. It just behaves unpredictably. It all depends heavily on the combination of pen, nib and paper. On cheap paper and with wetter nibs it's just plain ugly. Especially if you have small handwriting. With an EF nib, the ink is much more pleasing to the eye. The flow is more controlled, the relationship between ink and paper is much more in balance. Still not my favourite blue-black, but with an EF nib I can tolerate this ink. It also shows its blue background, instead of becoming an ugly blackish blob. Message to self: only use this ink with EF nibs - the finer the better. Conclusion 1864 Blue Black is an unpredictable ink with wildly varying behaviour depending on the combination of pen, nib and paper. The ink is too wet, and looks ugly even in F or M nibs. It really needs the shackles of an EF nib to become usable. The ink also has no water resistance to speak of. my overall score: C- (or B when using an EF nib)





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