Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

REVIEW: Conklin Crescent 2009


  • Please log in to reply
63 replies to this topic

#41 Joehek

Joehek

    Joehek

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 22 March 2009 - 21:12

QM2, Just a quick update. I have had my cresent for over 2 weeks now and all I can say is thank you for your review. This pen writes so well and for the price point I am thinking of getting another. Here is a photo of mine, hey it looks just like yours ohmy.gif Thanks again for your review!

[attachment=47739:DSC_0019.JPG]

Sponsored Content

#42 QM2

QM2

    .

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,875 posts
  • Location:the picturebooks

Posted 23 March 2009 - 18:33

Thank you for the beautiful photograph,
I am so glad you like the pen!

I've now also ordered the special edition "Mint Julep" Crescent from Fahrney's and will get it when I return to the US in April. I hope the gold nib on it will write as nicely as the steel nib on this one!

#43 Joehek

Joehek

    Joehek

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 23 March 2009 - 19:17

QM2, looking forward to your next review of the "Mint Julep"!

#44 brianw06

brianw06

    UB-in NJ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 355 posts
  • Location:3rd Planet in Orions Belt Also referred to as New Jersey

Posted 23 March 2009 - 19:26

I have the 2009 in Black and am throughly disgusted with it. Nib tines were badly bent and after straightening are a at best a poor writer
Please do not listen to me. My opinions do not count

#45 Joehek

Joehek

    Joehek

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 385 posts

Posted 23 March 2009 - 20:51

Wow, sorry to hear that Brian. Did the tines come bent when you purchased it? You should have sent it back. I really think for the price point this is one of the best writers I have.

#46 Pinmin

Pinmin

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 14:24

QUOTE (QM2 @ Mar 7 2009, 10:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Rufus @ Mar 6 2009, 10:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (QM2 @ Mar 6 2009, 04:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Indeed! Thankfully, I also don't care for Visconti's versions of the Crescent very much, so those are not on my acquisition list. But I do hope to hunt down every Stipula crescent ever produced! Those things are remarkable.

I like the Visconti Copernicus a lot and it was the pen that got me hooked on crescent-fillers; however, the Millenium Arc leaves me a bit cold, but I have one The Stipula crescent-filler is a great pen too, although the crescent on mine rattles if I shake the pen.

I love the material and the finish on the Copernicus, but it's something about the shape of the pen that does not appeal to me -- that pointy look to the tips. I can see myself getting over that eventually, but for now I am on the fence. However, the Millenium Arc just overall does not attract me: It has a metal section that I think is out of place with the rest of the pen, a colourful transparent look that visually competes with the trim and crescent, and an overall futuristic theme going that just looks like too much crammed into one pen. I think the whole point of the aesthetics of a crescent filler, is that the crescent and the lock ring visually stand out from the body. On the Millenium Arc, they made the lock ring near invisible, and incorporated the cresent into the double-arc design, essentially getting rid of the visual pleasure of the system.


QUOTE (Rufus @ Mar 6 2009, 10:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Back on topic, I was thinking of getting a Conklin MT crescent in Red Desert Stone Marble with a steel nib, but the only Conklin B&M dealer, from whom I bought my chased black Conklin MT crescent, I know of in my vicintity has stopped carrying Conklin and I'm leary of buying one without being able to try it first given their spotty track record; do you know if any of the on-line AD's, such as Swisher, would be prepared to give one a good try out before shipping to me, kind of like Richard B does? It's a real nuissance to have to ship a defective product back to the USA and then have it shipped back to me because of the border and all that entails.

I recommend FPH for this. I have asked them to try pens prior to shipping, and they have done. And, since they are pen repairers and not just sellers, they know how to check properly. Also, I know from personal experience that they are very good about handling returns/exchanges should that be necessary.

While FPH in NYC does not routinely test a pen before shipping, they will do so upon the customer's request and their guarantee is the best--a personal one from the infinitely-reputable owners. (not a paid ad!) Been buying from them 15+ years.


#47 Pinmin

Pinmin

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 14:26

QUOTE (QM2 @ Mar 1 2009, 01:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As far as I know, these modern crescent models have been released (feel free to correct me with supplements):

Conklin Mark Twain Crescent 2009 standard model (resins with silver-plated trim)
Conklin Mark Twain Crescent standard model (chased and smooth celluloid finishes and sterling trim)
Conklin Mark Twain Crescent solid silver overlay LE 2004
Conklin Mark Twain Crescent Royal Crescent LE 2003
Conklin Mark Twain Crescent Centenary LE 2001

Stipula Saturno
Stipula L'Orangerie
Stipula Sol Levante
Stipula Crescent for Xalegrafica

Visconti Copernicus
Visconti Millenium Arc



EDITED: I've now learned that the mysterious Stipula Crescent was made for Xalegrafica, so I've changed this information above.

Per Stipula Italy (last month), Saterno crescent filler returns to US market in June or July. I have already contacted FPH in NYC.


#48 Ghost Plane

Ghost Plane

    Indescribable

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28,424 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Flag:

Posted 24 May 2009 - 18:30

Oooo! Any word on colors? blink.gif

#49 jde

jde

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,694 posts
  • Location:how important is it, really?

Posted 29 May 2009 - 19:14

After reading all the caveats, I ordered one of these on sale from Swishers (online). I got the steel nib in a medium. All in all, no nib problems. It is a perfect writer! This pen also satisfied my curiosity about crescent fillers. Although the silver plated parts seem rather cheesy at best. Overall a very positive experience. Thanks for this review, QM2!
 
...writing only requires focus, and something to write on. —John August
...and a pen that's comfortable in the hand.—moi

#50 QM2

QM2

    .

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,875 posts
  • Location:the picturebooks

Posted 29 May 2009 - 19:45

Glad to hear this, jde! What colour did you get?

I agree that the trim is somewhat flimsy (thin), but for the price I think it is suitable.

#51 jde

jde

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,694 posts
  • Location:how important is it, really?

Posted 29 May 2009 - 20:13

QM2: I got the Spring Green/Gold Leaf. Same color as the one you reviewed. I'd get another in black for this model. I like it a lot!


#52 LedZepGirl

LedZepGirl

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,777 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo Michigan

Posted 30 May 2009 - 16:26

I'm definitely getting one of these when I have the money. I just can't decide what color I want, I have too many green pens, I don't particularly care for the brown and black one and I go to Western Michigan University not Michigan so I would get in trouble for the blue and yellow one. Black seems kind of boring. *sighs* I don't know what to do. A modern pen with a built-in filling system is so intriguing.
I'd rather spend my money on pens instead of shoes and handbags.

>>> My Blog <<<

#53 QM2

QM2

    .

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,875 posts
  • Location:the picturebooks

Posted 30 May 2009 - 22:25

QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ May 30 2009, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm definitely getting one of these when I have the money.


FYI, these are being sold on the FS forum right now for $75 shipped!
No affiliation.


#54 LedZepGirl

LedZepGirl

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,777 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo Michigan

Posted 31 May 2009 - 05:42

QUOTE (QM2 @ May 30 2009, 06:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ May 30 2009, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm definitely getting one of these when I have the money.


FYI, these are being sold on the FS forum right now for $75 shipped!
No affiliation.



I'll have to go check that out. Maybe someone will be interested in a trade and I have some pens that need to go. Thanks. smile.gif
I'd rather spend my money on pens instead of shoes and handbags.

>>> My Blog <<<

#55 Yuki Onitsura

Yuki Onitsura

    I ink, therefore I am

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 05 June 2009 - 11:31

QUOTE (QM2 @ May 31 2009, 08:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LedZepGirl @ May 30 2009, 06:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm definitely getting one of these when I have the money.


FYI, these are being sold on the FS forum right now for $75 shipped!
No affiliation.


Oh, I just purchased one of the green/gold ones via that close-out sale. Unfortunately, I think speerbob only has medium nibs in stock. No affiliation either, but all of my past transactions with speerbob on ebay have been very pleasant.

Yuki
Posted Image
Follow me on twitter! @crypticjunky

~And the words, they're everything and nothing. I want to search for her in the offhand remarks.~

#56 linnicky

linnicky

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 89 posts

Posted 07 June 2009 - 03:31


I have just got one of this pen with steel M nib. Spring green/gold leave color again. Everything is fine except I find the nib is just a bit too wet. I feed it with Private Reserve Lake Placid Blue ink. I don't want to feed it with too dark ink to avoid staining of this beauty. Anything I can do? Thanks.

#57 mike984

mike984

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Gold

  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 14 June 2009 - 13:48

QUOTE (Joehek @ Mar 23 2009, 03:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wow, sorry to hear that Brian. Did the tines come bent when you purchased it? You should have sent it back. I really think for the price point this is one of the best writers I have.


I just bought one these pens and I can tell you how the tines were bent. The pocket clip is attached with a phillips head screw inside the cap. There is no headway between the screw and the tines when it is capped. When you close the cap, it runs into the screw and further twisting will ruin the tines. Very bad design. I could feel the tines catch on something when I capped the pen. Taking out the screw and shooting superglue in it's place made the clip sturdy and it the cap twists fine now. Did this before I did any damage to the pen. Noticed something was wrong the first time I capped it. Someone else might cap and uncap it a few times unknowingly ruining the tines.

I think this would be applicable to all 2009 versions. Anyone else have this problem?

#58 jde

jde

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,694 posts
  • Location:how important is it, really?

Posted 16 June 2009 - 13:06

QUOTE (mike984 @ Jun 14 2009, 09:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just bought one these pens and I can tell you how the tines were bent. ...
I think this would be applicable to all 2009 versions. Anyone else have this problem?


No. In examing my pens, and despite finding differences in manufacture across them, there is a ton of room between the nib and that screw.
 
...writing only requires focus, and something to write on. —John August
...and a pen that's comfortable in the hand.—moi

#59 Dennis B

Dennis B

    Antique

  • Remembered Fondly
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,562 posts
  • Location:Parkville, Missouri

Posted 10 July 2009 - 19:57

Very nice review. I just received a Red Desert Stone, M nib, today. Haven't inked it yet to try it out, but will shortly. At first I thought the nib unit would be interchangeable with the Schmidt nibs used by Bexley in some models, but they are just a bit larger and do not fit. The Conklin seems to be a good value at Speerbob's closeout prices.

Dennis B



#60 sdonahue

sdonahue

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • Location:NE

Posted 25 May 2010 - 17:01

<img src="http://queenmargot.c...n_09cresc4.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>CONKLIN CRESCENT 2009
Green & Goldleaf</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->


<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Background and Significance</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

Since its relaunch of the Conklin brand, the new Conklin company has been releasing a variety of "Mark Twain Crescent"
models, from modest silver-trimmed celluloids to exuberant filigree overlays. These models pay tribute to the original
iconic Conklin Crescent -- famous not only for the striking look of this design element, but also for being the first
commercially viable self-filling fountain pen. A century later, the crescent filling system still has a magical charm --
partly because of the kitsch appeal, and partly because of its simplicity and practicality (it will not roll off the table when
uncapped).

The newest release of the Conklin Crescent (referred to, it seems, as the "Conklin Crescent 2009") differs from its modern
predecessors in that it is a "budget-line" pen. Unlike the previous standard-production model (which was made of celluloid,
embellished with substantial sterling silver trimmings, and fitted with a gold nib -- bringing its starting retail cost to almost
$400), the new Crescent has a resin body, silver-plated trim and a steel nib. Its typical retail cost at the moment is $130.

Say what you will about the recent complaints about Conklin's QC and customer service, the release of this new pen makes
an important historical statement. At a time when most fountain manufacturers are focused on largely decorative LEs and
will not even think about installing an internal filler into a standard production model, Conklin has made a $130 crescent-filler.
A crescent-filler for the people, if you will. I applaud and appreciate this gesture tremendously. Of course, the important
question is: Does the execution live up to the ideal?

<img src="http://queenmargot.c...n_09cresc5.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Looks and Design</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

The 2009 Crescent has a domed-top body, similar to the shape of the original early Conklin Crescent before they switched to
flat-top designs. The model is available in four colours: Yellow/Blue Marble, Green/Goldleaf Marble, Red Desert Stone Marble
and Midnight Black (plain solid black). Mine is the green and goldleaf, and choosing it was not just a matter of colour
preference. Though all three marbled resins are of high quality (I examined them at my local shop before buying), the green
and goldleaf stood out as having an absolutely incredible depth and luminosity. The resin, which I assume is acrylic, layers
patches of sage green, shimmery slate, and amber, in the most captivating manner possible for a non-celluloid. The pattern
and colour scheme also bears a resemblance to "Tiffany" style coloured glass.

<img src="http://queenmargot.c...n_09cresc3.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

For some odd reason, the photos I have taken of this pen make it seem that the amber colours dominate. However, in reality
the green colours dominate, with the amber acting as a warm accent.

The trim on the 2009 Crescent is described by Conklin as "silver plated". Frankly, it does not look it. It has a chrome
appearance and a light, flimsy feel to it. There is a noticeable difference between the trim on the new model and the trim on
the previous model, when you see them together (at the shop, the new black resin Crescent was lying next to the older
black chased celluloid crescent). Despite the pretty resin, the 2009 Crescent looks like a less expensive pen.

<img src="http://queenmargot.c...n_09cresc1.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Weight, Balance, Comfort</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

To my amazement, this is an area where the 2009 design actually wins over the previous version. I own the black chased
celluloid version of the older model, and one thing about it that is not ideal is the weight. The sterling silver trim, cap band
and clip are so thick, that they make the pen weigh a ton. Plus the balance is a little off, due to how the trim is distributed
throughout the pen. The 2009 version is light and perfectly balanced, with the thin metal trims adding just the right bit of
weight to keep the pen grounded while writing.

Happily, the section on the 2009 model is the same perfection as on the older version: curved, with a "lip" to keep fingers
from slipping down to the nib unit. Having a low grip, this is my favourite sort of section design.

Of course, the crescent adds to the comfort and convenience of this pen, by ensuring that it will not roll of the table if placed
there uncapped. For me, this is a very useful feature, as I frequently do this during meeting and other note-taking.

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Filling System</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

<!--coloro:#483D8B--><span style="color:#483D8B"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#8B0000--><span style="color:#8B0000"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#9ACD32--><span style="color:#9ACD32"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!! <!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <span style="color:#000080"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#FF8C00--><span style="color:#FF8C00"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#483D8B--><span style="color:#483D8B"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#8B0000--><span style="color:#8B0000"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#9ACD32--><span style="color:#9ACD32"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!! <!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <span style="color:#000080"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--> <!--coloro:#FF8C00--><span style="color:#FF8C00"><!--/coloro-->Crescent!!<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->
Yes, it is a crescent -- my favourite filling system. Like in a lever-filling pen, there is a sack inside, which gets compressed
when the disk is pressed into it. Release the crescent, and the sack opens back up, sucking the ink from the bottle through
the nib. The crescent is prevented from accidentally being pressed on its own by a locking ring. This is a very easy filling
system to use, and it looks beautiful, at least to me. Pistons, plunge fillers and levers are all lovely, but crescents are what
gets me to squeal with adoration. For a nice illustrated history of the crescent filler, see Richard Binder's <a href="http://www.richardsp.../crescents.htm" target="_blank"><i>The Crescent Filler:
Then ... and Now</i></a>.

<img src="http://queenmargot.c...n_09cresc2.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Nib</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

The nib is single-tone Iridium-tipped steel. It is simple and elegant in design, featuring the Coklin logo and the size marking.
Mine is an "F", and to my utter amazement, writes like a true fine (verging on extra-fine). Moreover, it is a perfect nib, and,
ironically, one of my best writers. Yes, one of the best writers in my entire collection of 70+ modern pens. The flow is perfect
(a very fine nib + wettish flow = yum), there are no problems with drying out. It is glass smooth (almost too smooth on
Rhodia paper), with no adjustments having been necessary out of the box. All this is in stark contrast to my other 3 Conklins,
the gold nibs on which had mild to terrible flow problems out of the box. Goes to show that steel nibs are not to be dismissed
when considering a pen purchase.

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Comments on Quality Control</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

I have no complains with QC issues on this pen. The nib is perfect. The trim is tightly and properly fitted (the crescent lines up
with both the clip and the nib). There are no kinks or blemishes in the resin. The sac fills fully and the ink lasts an appropriate
length of time between fills. The crescent does not rattle.

Having said this, please also note that I made a point of buying this pen from a local shop, in person. I examined it carefully,
and the owner allowed me to test the nib. Therefore, I cannot comment on what the luck of the draw would have been, had
I ordered it online.

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Cost and Value</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

A $130 Crescent filler in an age of $1000 C/C LEs! If you get a good one, it is an excellent value.

<!--coloro:#2F4F4F--><span style="color:#2F4F4F"><!--/coloro--><b>Conclusions</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

The 2009 Conklin Crescent does not look or feel like an expensive pen. But then it never claims to be one. It is a pen intended
for the crescent-loving user, and is made in a way that makes it affordable and utilitarian, without sacrificing prettiness. At the
time of writing this review, I have been using it for a month, and my satisfaction with it only grows over time. It is a very fun,
reliable, comfortable and attractive writing instrument, available for a great price. I would encourage those who are interested,
but are worried about QC issues, to either try it in a local shop, or to ask the retailer to test the pen prior to shipping. In my
experience, most retailers are agreeable to this. This really is too good of a deal to pass up.



I had a quite different experience with the same coloured Crescent, also F point. It did not write right out of the box. The crescent rattled constantly. Instead of a F point, this was more of a M. After a poor performance and quality of this typically bad Conklin pen, I returned it from whence it came for a full refund. I hope and pray that, since Yafa/Monteverde has taken over the Conklin name and production, a 180-degree turnaround in QC will happen.






Sponsored Content




|