Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Mont Blanc 310


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Steven

Steven

    Bon Vivant

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Sunny San Diego, CA
  • Flag:

Posted 22 February 2009 - 21:35

Chapter 1 - The Review
Introduction
There was a time not so long ago when Mont Blanc made fountain pens for the rest of us on tighter budgets. I am writing this review about one such Mont Blanc and because after many years of almost daily use it has become time to retire my Mont Blanc 310.

My first fountain pen was an extra fine Sheaffer 304 that was given to me by my then girlfriend who preferred ballpoint pens. I remember how curiously nice it was to write with this pen and it had a small chip midway down the tine split. I still have this pen and do occasionally ink it up and this was the pen that got me started on my life long obsession. As for my girlfriend, well I ended up marrying her and have been hitched to her for thirty-one years, and every time I get a new and more times than not, expensive fountain pen, I blame her for getting me addicted.

My second fountain pen is an extra fine red Pelikan Pelicano. This is a very nice writer and I still have this pen as well. My third fountain, rounding out my college year’s fountain pen collection is a fine nib Pilot Vanishing Point that I still use to this day in my rotation. I bought the Pelikan in the Northeastern University bookstore and I purchased the VP for I think under $30.00 at Broomfield Pen in Boston, a wonderful pen store, still in its original location. Since then I have amassed quite a large collection of fountain pens most of which are un-inked.



First Impressions
I purchased my 310 in the mid to late 70’s while attending college in Boston. It has been so long that I don’t remember how much I paid or from where I purchased it. What I do remember when buying it was how great this pen looked and especially in comparison to the more stogy looking Mont Blanc 14X series pens and that I could afford it. Heck I was young and didn’t think much or care about collecting fountain pens and this pen marked the fourth and final fountain pen purchased during my college years. Thus, without realizing it I had a fountain pen collection and had become a fountain collector.

Appearance & Design
A few years back I looked into the pedigree of my first Monty and learned that the 310 was designated as a school pen. The pen body and cap is made from some type of black acrylic (no precious resin here). The cap contains a gold ring at the crown from which the gold plated clip is attached. I have no idea what karat the gold is. At the top of the cap is the Mont Blanc white start trademark that is also at the pen bottom. With the cap removed and just above where the cap attaches is a small section of clear plastic that allows one to view the ink supply. In addition there protrudes small wire loops to which the cap locks to, similar to the way a Lamy 2000 cap attaches. The bottom of the cap also has a gold ring with the words “Mont Blanc Germany” inscribed. Where the cap mates to the body is gold ring and at that point is where the body unscrews from the nib section to allow access to the cartridge ink supply area.



Weight & Dimensions
This pen measures 13.7cm caped and un-caped measures 12.4cm and is very light in weight.



Filling System
The filling system is via Mont Blanc converter or ink cartridge. Way back when, I thought how novel an idea it was the hold two cartridges with one in reserve. I had never even considered a built in plunger type filler mechanism because I had felt they were old fashion. The converters of that day were also the squeeze to fill types that also did not appeal to me and so cartridges were the way to go. I also don’t even remember if my Mont Blanc even came with a converter. Besides the mere thought of dipping a pen in a bottle of messy ink to fill it up was repulsive. Nice to be young huh?

Nib & Performance
This was my first medium nib pen. My three previous pens were all x-fine/fine. What a revelation it was to write with a medium nib that put down a deep blue wet line. The nib just begged to be written with and the broadness of the line made the words jump off the page. Although the nib glides with ease over the paper, by comparison to other pens it has a much higher coefficient of friction, meaning that it is not buttery smooth, but nice enough. Through the years the nib has become pitted, which is one of the reasons for it being retired as an everyday writer. I have always used Mont Blanc ink so if the ink is the reason; it is not due to using some off brand ink. The nib is either gold or gold plated for I do not know, but looking into the pitted areas they exhibit the same color as the un-pitted areas on the nib thus; I am guessing that the nib is solid gold. I also do not know what the karat rating is.



Value - Priceless
It is too bad that Mont Blanc no longer makes any moderately priced pens for this pen shows they can and just won’t. I guess they just forgot marketing 101, get the young to buy and they will trade up. It worked for me for had I not bought this cheapie I probably would have never bought some of its painfully higher prices brethren. Remember there was no Fountain Pen Network then.

Conclusion
After over thirty years of use I must like this pen a little, you’d think? This pen has been a joy to use, very light weight and always working. I have spent more in buying ink cartridges to keep this thing fed than the cost of the pen itself many times over. I have used it to take notes in class a long time ago, meeting notes over the years at work, signed many a check, written many a letter and yes, I wrote this article with this pen before typing it up. If I knew then what I know now, as the saying goes, I would have bought a few more of these. I can only say that if the opportunity arises to pick one of these pens up at a pen show you will not be disappointed.



Chapter 2 - The Heir Apparent
Ravages of time
Tonight I shall drain and clean this pen for the last time and tuck it away in a pen storage draw in a slot of its own. I have had two pens wear or corrode out since getting my first pen. The first to corrode was my first Pilot VP where the nib assembly corroded through along the sides allowing the ink to leak out. Fortunately the newer nib assemblies fit the older VP’s as long as you use Pilot cartridges and this has give new life to this old modern pen.

My Mont Blanc 301 has not been so lucky for at the top of the cap, just below the gold band where the pocket clip is attached has developed a crack. Although the pen shows signs of wear and the nib is heavily pitted I fear that with further use the crack will get to the point where the top of the cap will break off. So it is now time to give my old friend a place to rest and give a newer Mont Blanc the chance to strut its stuff for another thirty year.

A new Beginning
So who is the heir apparent? Should it be the 149, 146 or 145? All never been inked and all calling to me from my current pen collection. How about a Starwalker or Boheme? These two pens live in some Mont Blanc boutique or fine pen shop as of yet to be possessed for a tidy sum. Or should I dare not replace my wonderful Monty 310 in my rotation for fear that I will be disappointed? Help me write the last chapter by helping me choose, and in an other thirty years, as I sit in some elderly home, I shall write the sequel and share it with all of you. Now where did I put that Parker 51?

Edited by Steven, 22 February 2009 - 21:42.

Avatar painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905) titled La leçon difficile (The difficult lesson)


Sponsored Content

#2 voukephalas

voukephalas

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 131 posts

Posted 23 February 2009 - 17:56

An emotional review -it tugs at the heartstrings. Thank you.

I would suggest using the 149 you already own. Since you already have one, it would be easy and efficient to select it over a pen as yet not purchased.

Using only a few pens for thirty years when you have others seems curious -why not ink and rotate their use? You could then enjoy the differences of each and prolong their lifespan.
The mediator between the head and hands must be the heart -Metropolis

#3 Ondina

Ondina

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,924 posts

Posted 23 February 2009 - 21:49

Nice review. If the nib pits, it probably a gold plated nib. but nice anyhow.

#4 MYU

MYU

    ... The key to it all is Capillary Action! ...

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,647 posts
  • Location:On a cliff, looking at NYC
  • Flag:

Posted 23 February 2009 - 23:10

Very nice review, Steven. These Montblanc pens are definitely understated. They are rather light and feel a little cheaper than the venerable 146 and 149 models, but MB put most of the money into the nibs, which I've found to be generally top notch. I do prefer the piston filler models, but MB cartridge converters work well... I just wish those translucent ink windows wouldn't stain so easily. sad.gif

As for an heir apparent, if you've got the $$ it would be worth taking a chance to own a 146 or 149... if you find it doesn't speak to you, it can always be sold (probably for around what you paid, the difference just being the "rent" of temporary ownership). Personally I like the 1960's Meisterstuck 7x series with gold cap. Nice luxurious feel without breaking the bank... smile.gif

Edited by MYU, 23 February 2009 - 23:12.

[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#5 dandelion

dandelion

    reality always trumps fiction

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,828 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 June 2009 - 20:28

I was browsing for vintage MBs and stumbled over this lovely review.
Thanks for this personal hommage!

Edited by dandelion, 07 June 2009 - 20:29.

*****the dandelion blog is right here*****
*****the dandelion flickr is right here*****

#6 Brian

Brian

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,432 posts

Posted 08 June 2009 - 22:34

Nice review. This pen was among one of the first MBs I have owned. I loved it except for its rather stingy ink supply which resulted in my selling it long ago - wish I didn't do that. The design is clean and remains "fresh" to this day.

I also have the red pelikano you are showing and it too is a favorite. There are few pens like the pelikano showing the ink supply even if using carts. The cap is also solid and the performance has always been superb. These days it sees use for editing with red ink.

Thanks for this trip into the not so distant past.

#7 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 26,150 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 09 June 2009 - 00:15

You can still find 1xx, 2xx and 3xx models on occasion; they are great pens and a joy to use.

BUT...

you can also still buy NEW Montblanc Generations pens that are the direct heir to your pen, even being cartridge/converter pens.

My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#8 goodguy

goodguy

    Fountain pens and watches collector

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,534 posts
  • Location:Toronto Canada
  • Flag:

Posted 09 June 2009 - 03:09

I love reading reviews and I enjoy most of them but your review is among the best reviews I ever read. It touched a cord in my heart.
I love MB pens and its so nice to see such a wonderful relationship between a man and his pen.
So sad you must put the 310 a side but it deservse it after 30 notisable years.

As for what pen to choose, I'd say if the 310 was good for you try the 146 for a month or so, I think it will have a warm spot in your heart in no time.

Thank you very very much for touching my heart like that and wonderful review.

Edited by goodguy, 09 June 2009 - 13:26.

Respect to all

#9 Ghost Plane

Ghost Plane

    Indescribable

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28,424 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Flag:

Posted 09 June 2009 - 11:50

The size of the 149 may be a shock to your system if you've used narrower pens for so long. Ink the 146 and ease into it.

#10 smk

smk

    Antique

  • FPN Tech. Admin

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,660 posts
  • Location:Toronto
  • Flag:

Posted 06 August 2010 - 19:37

I just saw one of these at a local MB boutique. The pen was in blue plastic with a 14k M nib that looked kinda stubbish and broader than a medium.

The listed price was approx. $350 and it was 30% off. The nib looked nice and they said they could do a nib exchange for it too. I'm not sure they really could though.

Salman K.

#11 lsmith42

lsmith42

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,722 posts

Posted 06 August 2010 - 19:52

My Bordeaux 310 is one of my favorites...

I wonder if what was seen in the boutique was a Generations? They look very similar...
MB JFK BB; 100th Anniversary M; Dumas M FP/BP/MP set; Fitzgerald M FP/BP/MP set; Jules Verne BB; Bernstein F; Shaw B; Schiller M; yellow gold/pearl Bohème Pirouette Lilas (custom MB-fitted EF); gold 744-N flexy OBB; 136 flexy OB; 236 flexy OBB; silver pinstripe Le Grand B; 149 F x2; 149 M; 147 F; 146 OB; 146 M; 146 F; 145P M; 162 RB

#12 smk

smk

    Antique

  • FPN Tech. Admin

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,660 posts
  • Location:Toronto
  • Flag:

Posted 06 August 2010 - 20:00

I wonder if what was seen in the boutique was a Generations? They look very similar...


Yup - must've been that. Thanks.

S.

#13 piembi

piembi

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,865 posts
  • Location:Germany
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2010 - 08:53

I have the 220 and 121 siblings of the 310 and like to use them. They have gold nibs that are springy and work perfectly well for everyday writing and note taking.

I wish, Montblanc had not stopped making second tier and schoolpens!

#14 buffalowings

buffalowings

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,128 posts
  • Location:belmont

Posted 07 August 2010 - 13:23

great review! say....does anybody notice how the early (affordable) montblanc's resemble early japanese fountain pens?
I'm a little hot potato right meow
"no they are not making littler ponies, they are EMBRACING"
I opened a box of cheerios and planted them. I thought they were doughnut seeds. They didn't sprout :( (joke of the week)

#15 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 26,150 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2010 - 15:56

Actually the two and three digit MB pens of the late 50s through the mid 70s seem to reflect the general trend of pens of the period, There was the Parker 75, the ST Dupont Classiques, Aurora Hastil, the Waterman Gentleman, the Sheaffer TMs just as a few examples; all were relatively slim pens by today's standard and about the same lengths.

My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#16 CrashOveride

CrashOveride

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Bronze

  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 17 January 2015 - 01:55

Apologies for commenting on this older post.

 

I am looking at getting a MB 310 fountain pen on ebay... hopefully for around $120 or so.

 

Can I use the cartridges that exist today, or do I need to also buy an adapter for the fountain pen?

 

Also what is the difference with a piston filler vs not on these Mont Blanc pens?

 

Any education would be very useful.

 

 

 

 

Thanks



#17 overwriter

overwriter

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 289 posts
  • Location:Calgary AB
  • Flag:

Posted 17 January 2015 - 04:55

Yes, the new cartridges work in these great old pens. 



#18 CrashOveride

CrashOveride

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Bronze

  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 18 January 2015 - 14:21

Thanks for the feedback.. looks like I am going to be the owner of a 1970s Mont Blanc 302

 

I got it for $115 + 10 shipping.



#19 Tom Kellie

Tom Kellie

    From EEF to BBBB Small Signature

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,206 posts
  • Location:Southern China
  • Flag:

Posted 09 April 2018 - 17:24

~ Reading this highly personal review showed another way to present fountain pens.

 

The images and text are meaningful, giving a palpable sense of this pen.

 

A well-prepared review.

 

Tom K.



#20 mitto

mitto

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,201 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 16 April 2018 - 05:08

A good review. I have a 320 that has a 14k soft F nib. Another pen that gives me great pleasure while writing with it is a MB 24 with a 14k left oblique flexy M nib. Among the cheap MBs, I have a few Monterosas. All with 14k flexy EF nibs.
Khan M. Ilyas






Sponsored Content




|