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Conway Stewart Appellation LE


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#1 Immoteus

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 09:27

First Impressions (9/10) – When I first saw pictures of the pen online, I was immediately drawn to its vibrant and beautiful refined design. A few months later I had the opportunity to hold the pen at the Los Angeles Pen Show and I realized the section was on the thinner side of my comfort range.


Appearance & Design (10/10) –The Appellation is based on the Conway Stewart Wellington with a black resin cap, (I believe to be) claret (resin or acrylic) body with a wide silver band polished to a high gloss finish. The design and colour is unique seeing how this is my first pen with subtle curves and dramatic hues. Inscribed on the silver cap band is “In Vino Veritas,” Latin for “In wine there is truth.” Ironically, there was a fully stocked bar at the pen show only a few steps away... wink.gif


Weight & Dimensions (9/10) – The pen is similar to the Pelikan M8XX series in terms of length and diameter. But the Appellation is 11.6 grams heavier possibly due to the brass weight located at the rear of the body and the cap. Posting is possible, but not recommended because it would make for a cumbersome writing experience. The dimensions for the pen are as follows:
Length Capped: 5 17/32 inches
Length Uncapped : 4 15/16 inches
Barrel Diameter: 0.49 inches
Weight: 1.43 oz (40.4g)*
Source: Richard’s Pens
*Weight is approximate since this pen is based on the Wellington model.


Nib & Performance (8/10) – For the nib, I chose an 18 karat gold two-tone fine italic nib which writes more like a stub than a cursive italic. The nib is soft with a hint of feedback. No problems so far with Moleskine, Rhodia or Clairefontaine.


Filling System (7/10) – The Appellation is fitted with a cartridge/converter filling system. Fortunately, the converter screws into the section of the pen to prevent any leaks should the pen be dropped, tossed around or subjected to other forms of unspeakable horrors. While I would have preferred a piston or lever filler, the converter holds a sufficient amount of ink.


Cost & Value (10/10) – The suggested retail price is 525 USD and can be purchased from the Marketplace for 425 USD. While I prefer not to disclose the amount of the transaction; I do not have any regrets buying this pen. It is well-balanced and the nib performs beautifully.


Conclusion (Final score, 53/60)
I would like to thank winedoc for designing such a unique fountain pen. Despite the shortcoming with the filling system I have no doubt that this pen will be a daily writer. Perhaps for next year there will be a sister pen to the Appellation; a Danitrio maki-e pen paying tribute to the wonders of water carrying the inscription "In Aqua Sanitas."




Pictures borrowed from winedoc until I'm able to produce better pictures.

Edited by MYU, 20 February 2009 - 21:57.

Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt.

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur.


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#2 FrankB

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 10:26

Thank you for a good review of one of my personal favorites. Your assessment mostly reflects my own. I am impressed with the pen.

Even in these economic times, I sprang for an Appellation and I have been so glad I did. Last year it served as my birthday and Christmas gift(s). I have few words to describe the superb fit and finish on this pen model. Along with high quality materials, my pen just reeks of quality. I like the extra weight this pen has contrasted to most of my resin/celluloid pens. Of course, Kevin's choice of design elements give this pen a subtle elegance that is unique, as an LE should be.

I also have a F italic nib, and I agree it is stub like. I expected that from a F italic as it just does not have sufficient surface area to create extreme line variation. Nevertheless, my nib does produce some (variation) and it seems to have a living, organic bond with the paper as I write. Mine has yet to hesitate to start, even after sitting for a week unattended. I would give the nib performance a good 9 or 9.5/10. I think that is the only place my assessment might differ from yours.

This is only my second C-S pen. My first is an older C-S 58 I got right after the C-S name was revived, and it is a great pen, too. Of course, the 58 is all celluloid and smaller than the Appelation. I am going to have to look into another C-S pen later this year.

I hope you enjoy your Appellation as much as I am enjoying mine.

#3 Immoteus

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 06:09

You're welcome! I'm glad to see other owners feel (almost) the same way about the pen. But I'll most likely swap nibs because it's too wide for my writing style.

Edited by Immoteus, 18 February 2009 - 10:24.

Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt.

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur.


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#4 diplomat

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 10:22

I am not familiar with the pen or the brand, but I'd like to congratulate (with winedoc, I guess!) for the beautiful pics and the whole setup.
I was born in 1971 so it's a personal pleasure to see that French bottle of Medoc is my age!

Cheers,

#5 Rufus

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 22:26

Sorry to rain on your parade, but when this pen first came out I looked and looked at it and finally realised what bother me about it: it looks like a Frankenpen; I just don't get the cap and barrel combination. The price seems a bit over the top as well.
Bryan

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#6 PeterBeoworld

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 16:51

I too have one of these and am very happy with it. I understand the Frankenpen thoughts but if you imagine it as a bottle of wine and the cap as the black foil which once removed leaves the wine in all its glory, it makes sense. The engraving on the lid of the pen shows it to be clearly a single set.
I agree that given the choice, a lever or piston would have been even nicer but I am very happy with it. Similar in colour to my Aurora Optima Burgundy but a bit more substantial.

#7 Rufus

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 15:41

QUOTE (PeterBeoworld @ Feb 19 2009, 11:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I too have one of these and am very happy with it. I understand the Frankenpen thoughts but if you imagine it as a bottle of wine and the cap as the black foil which once removed leaves the wine in all its glory, it makes sense. The engraving on the lid of the pen shows it to be clearly a single set.
I agree that given the choice, a lever or piston would have been even nicer but I am very happy with it. Similar in colour to my Aurora Optima Burgundy but a bit more substantial.


It doesn't work for me, as most red wine bottles are dark-coloured so you can't see the colour of the wine in the bottle. I think the end piece of the barrel should be black to tie it in with the cap. There's nothing wrong with the colour of the barrel, it's just the combination with the cap without a tie in that makes it visually discordant for me.

Bryan

"The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes." Winston S. Churchill






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