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OMAS Cristoforo Colombo II Review


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Joehek

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 06:12

Hi all,

This is my first review so please go easy on me. I did not see a review of this particular pen and thought it would be valuable to share since I found the pen so intriguing. Originally produced in 1992 to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' discovery of the new world, the Colombo II pen is named to honor the magnificent sailing ship designed by the architectural firm Vallicelli in 1992.

Initial Impression: 10/10
The first think you notice is the unique box for this pen. It is made of a blue fiberglass material, the same material used on the Colombo II sailing ship. The box is made to scale to resemble the stern of the Colombo II ship. The inner lining is made of a suede material, supposedly the same material used in Ferrari's .
[attachment=44047:Omas_Col...o_II_003.JPG]
[attachment=44048:Omas_Col...o_II_004.JPG]


Look/Finish: 10/10
When the box is opened it unveils, IMHO, a work of art. The Colombo II is not made of celluloid, it is briarwood. It has the traditional OMAS 12 faceted shape. The briarwood is entirely worked by hand and although I have heard rumors that OMAS was not well know for their wood pieces, they could have fooled me on this design, it is excellent. After reading the material that came with the pen OMAS suggests the wood is worked to give it maximum strength without compromise to the weight. The cap is a screw on and is highlighted by the Greek key, symbol of OMAS. It is decorated in 18K gold trim and the trim can also be found inside the cap just above the thread line.
[attachment=44051:Omas_Col...o_II_007.JPG]
[attachment=44049:Omas_Col...o_II_005.JPG]

Feel/Balance: 10/10
This is the lightest pen I have in my collection. If you don't post your pens you could write with this pen for hours. I typically don't post my pens but I tried it to see what the impact would be, and although there is a noticeable impact it is nothing compared to posting your 149. I took some photos to compare the size of the Colombo II to the 149 and I wish I could tell you the weight but I think the 149 weighs 3 times as much.

Capped- 5-1/2"
Posted-almost 6-7/8"
Diameter of the barrel (Largest part)- Just under 2"
Diameter of cap-2-1/2"
[attachment=44058:P2100001.JPG]

Filling System: 9.5/10
The filling system is a Piston filler that operates very smoothly and holds a lot of ink. It would have been nice to have an ink window but for all the other benefits of this pen I can live without it.

Nib: 10/10
I could not find too much on the Internet regarding this pen but I did notice that some of these pens came with a flexible 14K nib. Mine came with an 18K F point and writes like you would not believe. The ink flow is very wet and there is just enough flex. The nib is as smooth as can be. When I am writing with this pen it puts a smile on my face. The 1994 is the year this pen was manufactured.
[attachment=44050:Omas_Col...o_II_006.JPG]

Price/Value: 8/10
First of all I had one heck of a time finding this pen. I found a few sites that were advertising it but they were asking ridiculous numbers, over $1000. I found it on ebay and there were only a few people bidding on it, so I jumped on the opportunity and ended up paying about $550 which included shipping. I know that is not a inexpensive pen and there are a lot of other pens out there for that price range but there is something special about this pen so I had to have it and I thought $550 was an fair price especially since the pen was brand new and never inked and it came with box and papers. That being said I still can't give the price/value more than a 8.

Overall: 9/10
Even though this pen was a little more than I was expecting to pay, I am glad I have it! This pen has become a joy to write with. It will be cherished for many years to come. If you ever get the opportunity to experience this pen please try it, I think you will be equally impressed.

Edited by Joehek, 11 February 2009 - 06:23.


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#2 acfrery

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:20

Hi,

Though I am not a fan of wooden pens, I saw this model in person and I can attest it is a fascinating piece of art. I would certainly love to have it.

Congratulations,

Alejandro

#3 pankajwillis

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:07

Wow that's a beautiful pen! The nib on my Omas Paragon is the best out of all my pens (My VP is the only one that matches it) - glad to hear your's is that good too.


Edited by pankajwillis, 11 February 2009 - 12:09.

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#4 Doug C

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:42

I remember this pen from when I was just starting to get into Omas. I think this was truly produced during the company's heyday, when some of their most memorable modern pens were produced.

Although I know that there are a lot of people on FPN that don't care about the packaging, just hearing what kind of materials went into the contruction of the box, and having seen their wooden pens, reminds of what a different company they were before they were acquired. Imagine them doing that today.

I have a Marconi from 1995 that has the same level of detail and care into the pen (and the box, beautiful unfinished mahogany).

I also have some new Omas (360, and a new style Arco Milord) that I love, I really do miss the great detailing in the old style Greek key motif that surrounds the body. they should go back to that.

Beautful pen.

Edited by Doug C, 11 February 2009 - 12:44.

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#5 Joehek

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 14:56

Hi Doug,

I just picked up the new celluloid 360 and it is amazing. I love the look and the nib is fantastic. I also ordered the Paragon ARCO HT, should be here any day now. I have heard a lot about this pen but never have seen it in person so I am anxious to receive it. What do you like about the Milord? I was thinking of getting a Milord Wild.

#6 Doug C

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 15:19

QUOTE (Joehek @ Feb 11 2009, 07:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi Doug,

I just picked up the new celluloid 360 and it is amazing. I love the look and the nib is fantastic. I also ordered the Paragon ARCO HT, should be here any day now. I have heard a lot about this pen but never have seen it in person so I am anxious to receive it. What do you like about the Milord? I was thinking of getting a Milord Wild.



First of all, the way it writes. I was very hesitant since I had heard about so many problems, but mine is a fine, very smooth, and it is not too wet or dry, and the line is just what I would expect a European fine to be. It is one of those pens that I didnt have to prime or cajol at all. It just started up.

The weight is perfect (whether I post or not depends on the pen-I don't post this one). I like like pens, and this one is very light for the size.

I love the looks of the older style as well as the new so that was not a factor. I had wanted an Arco for years so finally seeing that the one I received was as beautiful as others I had seen was a real treat. For me, it is just one of the most beautiful pens around.

I do have a problem with the facets lining up, but rather than risk the factory messing with something they shouldnt, I just left it as is. Unusual for me, in that I like things to be perfect. If they always lined up when the cap was put on, I might have been a little fussier, but I kind of like it when the 'brighter' portions alternate (if that makes sense).

All in all, a wonderful pen.

By the way, I think the black Milords are now CC, but the celluloids are still piston (someone will correct me if I am wrong on that).


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#7 RedRob

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 04:44

Congratulations for the pen and thanks for the review. I agree this is among the lightest and most comfortable pens out there, more so than the celluloid equivalent.

#8 Peter from Sherwood Park

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 04:49

This is a great looking pen that I was not aware of. Briarwood pens are great (I have a Platinum 3776 in briarwood and it is a favorite of mine). Thank you for posting this, even though you have made me jealous.

#9 Joehek

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 05:03

Rob & Peter,

Thank you for the kind remarks. Rob, it was actually you that gave me the direction on this pen and the new ARCO HT I just received, I appreciate your guidance. You were right about the characteristics of this pen, they are wonderful!

#10 Doug C

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 20:57

Joe,


How big a difference is there between the Briar, and the metal section on the Arco in terms of weight?


Do you have a preference for one over the other, how do the nibs compare (considering that one is a new style, and the other old)?
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#11 diplomat

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 21:30

QUOTE (Joehek @ Feb 11 2009, 07:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is my first review so please go easy on me.


No need to go easy since it is a great first review!

In 1992 there where loads of tributes to Cristoforo Colombo from the pen companies. I'd love to see some pictrures from the Visconti Caravel Celluloid series...

Thanks again for the review.

Andre

#12 Deirdre

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 23:25

That is a stunning pen.
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#13 Joehek

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 00:21

Andre and Deirdre, thank you for the kind remarks!

#14 Celticshaman

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Posted 13 December 2009 - 01:53

A shame that the photos disappeared. Would love to see them.

Jim






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