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Posting nibs


19 replies to this topic

#1 ksskss

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 14:22

This is a particularly difficult topic to search for, since 'posting' and 'nib(s)' give you lots of information you don't want. Even 'posting nibs' gives you everything you don't want too.

What I'm interested in knowing is

Who makes them? I saw a Namiki on Ebay for instance. I think I'm interested in Japanese ones, but I'm not sure and open to suggestions.

Are the Esterbrook posting nibs anything like the Japanese nibs or is this just overlapping nomenclature?

How well do they write? Are they scratchy? Do they write on a variety of papers (presumably post cards and such, hence the name)?

Does anyone have any writing samples, comparing them to other nibs.

Would you rate the nibs as medium, fine, xf, or finer?

Thanks in advance.

---
Ken

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#2 Breck

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 14:32

QUOTE (ksskss @ Jan 1 2009, 10:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is a particularly difficult topic to search for, since 'posting' and 'nib(s)' give you lots of information you don't want. Even 'posting nibs' gives you everything you don't want too.

What I'm interested in knowing is

Who makes them? I saw a Namiki on Ebay for instance. I think I'm interested in Japanese ones, but I'm not sure and open to suggestions.

Are the Esterbrook posting nibs anything like the Japanese nibs or is this just overlapping nomenclature?

How well do they write? Are they scratchy? Do they write on a variety of papers (presumably post cards and such, hence the name)?

Does anyone have any writing samples, comparing them to other nibs.

Would you rate the nibs as medium, fine, xf, or finer?

Thanks in advance.

---


Ken


I don't know who all makes them these days, but posting nibs are extra fine (or finer) firm (or rigid, really) nibs. I have an Esterbrook one (9450), and it's definitely not scratchy. Nor is it butter-smooth, mind you, but not scratchy.

I can put up a writing sample later. First things first, though: Coffee.


#3 Paddler

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 19:18

I think the word "posting" refers to making a "good" copy of something, like copying the entries written in a day book into a ledger book.

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#4 Rob G

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 20:27

It refers to post cards. This is from an eBay description:

"Pilot designed this nib especially for Japan’s early post office cards - hence the name. These postal cards were significantly cheaper to mail than an official letter; thus, most business mail and informal correspondence was done on these cards. Even today, the postal card tradition continues as the Japanese send "nengajos" (New Year postcards) to everyone they know during the holiday season.

In the 1920s these cards were made of a soft, loose fiber - paper that was ideal for brush pens, but not so ideal for fountain pens - so Pilot engineered its posting nib. This nib has a long nib blank with a fine or extra fine point, and with little flex. The iridium point is specially ground to be super smooth. The interesting thing about this nib is that it has a slight downward curved point that helped make a darker line on the soft paper.

Pilot still makes this nib today and it is ideal for people who write fast, like journalists or university students taking notes, or people who like to use soft paper."



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#5 AJP

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 00:57

I have two posting nibs both on Pilot pens. According to Pilots description, the nib is downturned and can writer a harder very thin character. I would agree with that description on both of mine. Both write very nice thin lines that accomodate my fast writing style when taking notes, so I like them. I have had no problems writing on various papers with them.

Pilot definitely still makes them.

The earlier description that Rob G posted appears to come from an essay by Dr. Ron Dutcher, posted here some time ago. See link below.

Japanese Nib Field Guide

The nibs are nice, but I don't think they are for every one smile.gif

Im not sure about the Estie nibs.

Edited by AJP, 02 January 2009 - 01:01.

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#6 Paddler

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 03:58

Waterman and Esterbrook both made bookkeeping (posting) nibs. In the 19th Century, there were posting nibs for dip pens. These had very fine points for "posting" ledger entries. There were no postcards in those days. I had not heard about nibs made expressly for Japanese postcards.

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#7 ksskss

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 09:53

Thanks for the replies. I believe what I'm interested in is the Japanese Postcard type of posting nib that Rob mentions.

AJP, could you post a writing sample using the posting nibs (any paper and any ink is fine).

Did Platinum or Sailor (or any others) make these nibs or was it just Pilot who made them?

---
Ken



#8 Kuhataparunks

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 09:25

I just got a posting nib Elite and I cannot believe how much I LOVE it!!!
It is just between a Penmanship's EF and any Pilot F nib, and it is a rich, full line.
Most fountain pen users like thick lines, and these posting nibs are fine so they detract a lot of character from the writing. Also, they offer zero line variation even with pressure. But it suits my writin style greatly and am hoping to find another one!!

#9 Algester

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:09

the japanese big 3 has their own style of posting nibs Pilot as the PO posting, Platinum has the ellusive XXXEF I think they also have a quad X EF and then there's sailor's discontinued special nib which I forgot it's in mottishaw's site though



#10 hari317

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 11:43

The Posting nib is EF but in addition has the property of maintaining its line width despite pressure/ a heavy hand. It has no give at all. HTH.


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#11 ANM

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:08

The finer the nib, the more likely it is to be 'scratchy'.  How much so depends on how  clean it feed , how well it is tuned, tipping material, ink used and paper. 


Edited by ANM, 16 August 2014 - 12:11.

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#12 LeonW

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 18:44

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#13 notraces

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 20:08

I have two posting nibs both on Pilot pens. According to Pilots description, the nib is downturned and can writer a harder very thin character. I would agree with that description on both of mine. Both write very nice thin lines that accomodate my fast writing style when taking notes, so I like them. I have had no problems writing on various papers with them.

Pilot definitely still makes them.

The earlier description that Rob G posted appears to come from an essay by Dr. Ron Dutcher, posted here some time ago. See link below.

Japanese Nib Field Guide

The nibs are nice, but I don't think they are for every one smile.gif

Im not sure about the Estie nibs.

I just bought a Pilot 912 with the posting nib - I tried one out and loved it. I have an ongoing project where I send at least one postcard a week out to friends and family. Up until now I've used a Sharpie for the task.

 

The one thing I forgot to ask the dealer is - which ink works best when writing a postcard? Is there a good ink that won't run in the event the postcard gets a little sprinkle while being delivered?

 

Does anyone have a good ink recommendation (I prefer black) for postcards?



#14 ac12

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 21:37

Posting nib was for bookkeepers, posting journal entries onto ledger sheets.

Ledger sheet is a HARD SMOOTH paper, so a very fine nib will not snag and will write smoothly on it.


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#15 ehemem

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 22:29

 

 

Does anyone have a good ink recommendation (I prefer black) for postcards?

 

Noodler's Black.



#16 napalm

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 03:21

fpn_1406905923__smallwriting.jpg



#17 hari317

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 06:26

.

 

Does anyone have a good ink recommendation (I prefer black) for postcards?

i use ferrogallic inks or the water resistant Pilot Blue-black.


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#18 SchaumburgSwan

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 10:59

Hi,

 

I have a vintage Mabie Todd Swan (late 1930s) with Posting nib writing a fine/medium line with only a bit of line variation. A dry writer.

 

Looking at a 1921 catalog Posting nibs are described as

"For bookkeepers (...) The "Swan" Posting Pen makes a fine, uniform line which does not require blotting. (...) It requires no pressing or gripping, but only needs to be guided; ..."

 

The catalog shows a needle point posting nib and a posting nib (also in a "turned up" version... what ever that means...).

 

Best

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#19 AAAndrew

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 14:59

Sounds like we have the same term used to signify similar, but different nibs, for different purposes.

A posting nib originally, as others have pointed out, indicated a dip nib for writing, or “posting” accounts in a ledger. These were generally fine, to write in between lines of a ledger, fairly stiff, didn’t need fancy writing and the numbers and names had to be clear, and durable.

Later fountain pen makers were following this patterns with posting nibs, except, it seems, the Japanese who had another use in mind for the term.

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#20 Honeybadgers

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 21:14

I have an esterbrook PO nib, the design of a PO nib is to be very fine and with a downward turn to the nib so it is extremely rigid and usually very fine (the japanese one is a real EF) because they were designed to write on REALLY awful paper such as old japanese postcards (another possible source for the name)

 

I love my esterbrook PO nob. it's not super smooth, but it writes superbly well. I have heard the japanese PO nibs are extremely smooth for how fine they are. The esterbrook is fantastic for doing math though I really do wish I had a more modern pen that would accept an esterbrook nib (my two vintage S/J models are kinda rough but have two of my favorite steel nibs, an oblique stub and the PO.)


Edited by Honeybadgers, 08 July 2018 - 21:16.

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