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Montegrappa NeroUno


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22 replies to this topic

#1 diplomat

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 20:10

Montegrappa NeroUno




First impressions
The pen is long, much longer than I thought. It is 14,4 cm, just two mm shorter than the Van Gogh maxi, less than one cm shorter than my "lenght champion" the Omas 360 Visio. (for your convenience here there is a pic of the Nerouno between some pens of my collection, one more example: the DolceVita medium is 13,5 cm).



Plus to this: it's heavy! With a cartridge inside, my scale says 32 grams, whereas an Optima or a Milord run on the 21 and 20 grams (but without ink). So the difference is marked (even when you add the extra delta of the ink).
First consequence of this is that any "poster" will have its difficult time when writing. Me, for once, I do not post, so this is not a problem.

Design
Another oddity is the 6 faceted body, quite strange, even compared to the 12 faceted Omases.I don't own square pens but I think that is the shape more similar. It's rough in the hand, leading to infinite play during the meetings! On the other hand it is a pen that will stay on the desk.





Other side of the weigth is the percieved quality: very high. Resin, inset metal part, assembly within nib and section, engraved logo, all concur to this experience. The pen is solid and made with top materials. I especially like the metal threads of the body where the cap screws. There is a nice noise of "metal on metal". The cap close in 1,5 turns and the last 0,5 has a pleasant feeling of "tighten" given by the narrowing of the threads. It's a "smooth" feature, better than the one on the Sailor.

Nib
Someone do not like the shape of the nib, it is too similar to a Pelikano they said. That's true from the distance, but a closer look will reveal (again, quality) the squared 3D shape of the nib, the perfect clean line between nib, feed and body, and the lovely "Montegrappa" marked for the lenght of the nib (especially visible for the right handed writer, don't know if a lefty version exists!).



The feeling when writing is just ok: not too smooth, without any feedback, more stiff than flexi... it lacks some personality from my point of view.

Filling system
Another minus is the filling sistem: the pen is only available on c/c filling. And no converter comes with the pen, which is an oddity. Luckily it acccept international cartridges and converters, but beware: because of the end of the pen is tapered (to allow posting, which is not possible due to the lenght and the weight of the pen btw...) not all the converter will fit. E.g. my Visconti don't, the Delta will.

Writing
Here's one sample of the pen at work:



As previously said, the flow is ok, the line is medium in the tradition of the European producers (like Pelikan or Omas). Just nothing exciting.

Conclusions:
All in all this instrument makes for a great quality pen. I love the shape, classic but with some modern touch, the details (like the blind cap with 1912 engraved or the Montegrappa logo on the cap and nib) and the size. But the lacking of a self filling mechanism and the nib without a personality will make this NeroUNo a non-regular user for me.

Cheers,




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#2 lovemy51

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 07:32

thanx for the honest review. the pen is very eye catching. too bad it doesn't come with a converter!!!... odd!!!

#3 Michael R.

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 09:37

Many thanks for your review! I was waiting for one to show up since I've got the same pen some time ago.

While I really like the appereance and quality of the overall finish I do not get along with the nib.

Since the nib and feed is a re-issued semi-vintage Montblanc nib (used on the Classic, Gerneration, and many other pens of the 1970's-1990's - yes, you can exchange those parts as their are identical!) mine is at least semi-flexible (I got the "EF" nib).

The nib writes pretty smooth but because it shows some flex I lift it of the feed too much while writing causing it to skip. The pen went back to Montblanc in Hamburg (they do the Montegrappa Service in Germany) but they could not do much about that because of the flexible nature of the nib.

If you like to write "light-handed" this nib might be perfect but it is not for me.


In case you would like to try my "EF" instead of yours I might consider a trade as I really would prefere a stiffer nib on that pen; let me know backchannel. We could just trade nibs as it can be easily removed from the gripping section!


Cheers

Michael



#4 Kurtz

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 11:29

Nice review. This pen is on my wish list, so I read it with interest.
Sure the nib is sort of controversial, but I do think that it matches perfectly the design of the body (we can take it as a character feature as well happyberet.gif).
It is a pity that thing about the converter issue, but I hope it is something easy to solve with a compatible one (as you mentioned).

Thank you.

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#5 feiye

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 12:06

Thanks for the review. The NeroUno has been a great writer for me, no skipping at all but also no flex either...

I always purchased the Montegrappa converter for the pen, annoying and expensive ($10 for a converter????) but some places will provide a converter free of charge.
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#6 diplomat

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 12:06

QUOTE (Michael R. @ Nov 2 2008, 10:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...as it can be easily removed from the gripping section!


Wow, it's similar to the Safary/Studio trick? I am not going to try now because it's inked...

Andre

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#7 gary

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 14:07

Very nice review: your photos and text make this appear to be a much higher quality pen than the catalog pages I've seen would indicate.

Seems like the perfect nib to have customized into a stub or cursive italic. Michael R mentions the Montblanc look-alikes.
I had a 14 turned into a cursive italic, as well as a 256. The NeroUno's shape and style begs for a nib to match.

Thanks for the time for the detailed review,
gary

#8 Michael R.

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 16:32

QUOTE (diplomat @ Nov 2 2008, 04:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Michael R. @ Nov 2 2008, 10:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...as it can be easily removed from the gripping section!


Wow, it's similar to the Safary/Studio trick? I am not going to try now because it's inked...

Andre

p.s. PM sent |^_^|


No, not at all.

(1) Unscrew the metal part where the section screws into the barrel
(2) Unscrew the black plastic part you see inside the section (looks like an "X" with the feed channel in the middle); use something with two pointy things to unscrew this plastic screw from inside the section
(3) Carefully push back the nib/feed assembly into the section

(4) Never try to remove the nib from the feed as this most likely will end in permanent damage!


Cheers

Michael



#9 Ghost Plane

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 20:15

Puzzled over this one. Glad to hear it's comparable to a Van Gogh, but has anyone got a Carene to make comparisons between the way the nib feels?

#10 Michael R.

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 21:05

QUOTE (Ghost Plane @ Nov 2 2008, 12:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Puzzled over this one. Glad to hear it's comparable to a Van Gogh, but has anyone got a Carene to make comparisons between the way the nib feels?



Totally different.

My Carene (early, late 1990's model) has a nib stiff as a nail; my NeroUno has a nib very similar to the soft or semi-flex nibs of the 1970's Montblanc pens as they share the same construction.

My NeroUno "EF" nib writes almost as broad as the "M" nib of my Carene pressing down a little bit while writing.

Michael



#11 Ghost Plane

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 22:39

Thanks!

#12 diplomat

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 22:43

QUOTE (Michael R. @ Nov 2 2008, 05:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (diplomat @ Nov 2 2008, 04:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Michael R. @ Nov 2 2008, 10:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...as it can be easily removed from the gripping section!


Wow, it's similar to the Safary/Studio trick? I am not going to try now because it's inked...


No, not at all.

(1) Unscrew the metal part where the section screws into the barrel
(2) Unscrew the black plastic part you see inside the section (looks like an "X" with the feed channel in the middle); use something with two pointy things to unscrew this plastic screw from inside the section
(3) Carefully push back the nib/feed assembly into the section
(4) Never try to remove the nib from the feed as this most likely will end in permanent damage!
Cheers
Michael


Ok, thanks. Looks too dangerous for me!

Andre

#13 Rasendyll

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 03:03

Great review, just a couple of things I have noticed with mine:

-It's actually an eight sided design rather than six.
-I find Ican post the cap and write, but bear in mind that when I say thatI write with my Pelikan M1050 (vermeil cap) posted.

My nib is a lovely flexible fine. When I purchased the pen the shop agreed that it was riduculous there was no converter and fitted one for me free of charge.



#14 diplomat

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 14:50

QUOTE (Rasendyll @ Nov 3 2008, 04:03 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
-It's actually an eight sided design rather than six.


Yes, thanks for pointing this out! You are absolutely right! Btw the difference with 12 faceted pens (like Omas Arte Italiana) is still relevant.

QUOTE (Rasendyll @ Nov 3 2008, 04:03 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
-I find Ican post the cap and write, but bear in mind that when I say thatI write with my Pelikan M1050 (vermeil cap) posted.


Of course this is a subjective matter. I don't post my M800!!

QUOTE (Rasendyll @ Nov 3 2008, 04:03 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My nib is a lovely flexible fine. When I purchased the pen the shop agreed that it was riduculous there was no converter and fitted one for me free of charge.


That's good, I purchased the pen second hand (here) with no converter.
The good thing is that Montegrappa provided the converter connector with threads, so that converters can screw in. Not all the converters have threads btw.

Ciao and thanks for your observations.

Andre

#15 mremptypants

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 18:23

I have been lusting over this pen for about a year. I just picked up a rose gold version at the SF Pen Show. Although I agree with all the above review points, I would suggest they are individual preference points. I don't post and I love it. The M is a bit fatter than typical.
The box is a bit low budget, but my came with a Montegrappa Converter (screw in type) and 2 black cartridges. If you register they double the warranty period to 2 years. They will also swap nibs within 90 days at an authorized dealer.

#16 MikeW

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 19:08

I also read this review with interest.

When I first saw the Nero Uno, I thought it was a neat design so I bought one, actually it is a Nero Uno Linea with the rose gold trim and a medium nib. While I am not a huge fan of rose gold, I do have two pens with it - this and the "vintage" Omas 360 LE. I am actually surprised that I like the way the rose gold looks but that is another discussion.

A couple of observations. I love the fit of the pen in my hand, both the facets and the lines make it feel very comfortable, whether posted or not. I actually prefer the pen posted and again, it fits together perfectly like a hand and glove.

The medium nib writes very smoothly and with a bit of spring to it. I did not feel any tooth, just glide. I also agree with the comment, there is no comparison between this nib and a Carene nib, the Carene nib being stiff as a nail.

I had not heard about having to buy a converter with these pens. My pen came with one as did two other Montegrappas that I also recently acquired. I would also add that these pens came factory-wrapped so I don't see how the dealer could have put a free one in the box. Maybe I just got lucky?

Bottom line, I love my Nero Uno. It is exactly what I had hoped for.

MikeW

 

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#17 Bagworth

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 10:23

I've recently joined FPN and have been looking at various pens to keep my lonely Pelikan company.

I discovered the Nero Uno and like other reviews and owners have been delighted with my decision to buy. As I am not a collector and I use my pens every day I'm interested in how it writes and with the medium nib I got with mine I'm delighted with the smoothness, flow and no skip writing. I had viewed the Nero Uno on-line but it was only when I picked up one at my local pen shop that I instantly knew and felt that it was right for me. I decided to go with a metal barrel finish version rather than resin as I felt the matt and slightly textured finish was good in the hand. This version was slightly heavier and this suits me, although as I have smallish hands the size of the pen is perfect.

So far so good. Having used the Pelikan (20 year old M400 size) for a long time my only gripe is that the convertor system doesn't contain as much ink and so as a writer it means I have to refill more often with the Montegrappa Nero Uno. A minor price to pay for a lovely smooth and well-balanced pen.

Edited by Bagworth, 14 December 2011 - 10:24.

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#18 Bagworth

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 10:26

P.S. My local shop threw in the convertor and a bottle of Montegrappa black ink for nothing extra.
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#19 Ipsilon

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 19:05

Very nice pen!

The one I bought came with a Montegrappa converter and a bottle of ink!! And it was bought in Italy...

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#20 Skeet

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 17:57

"The feeling when writing is just ok: not too smooth, without any feedback, more stiff than flexi... it lacks some personality from my point of view."




Sorry to read that sentence. Still a beautiful along with an honest review. Thanx.


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