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Lamy 2000 EF


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8 replies to this topic

#1 mstone

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 22:12

There's been a lot of talk about the Lamy 2000 with extra fine nib lately, so I thought I'd throw in my two cents.

First, the generic pen review items: don't care about the box; we all know what a Lamy 2000 looks like; the piston is relatively stiff; it doesn't post well without jamming on the cap, possibly marring the finish. But how does it write, and what is a Lamy 2000 EF in relation to other nibs?

I don't find the nib "scratchy", but it is definitely not as lubricated a big broad gusher. (In my experience, this is fairly normal for finer nibs.) For me, the EF writes fairly fine, but I've also found it to be one of my springier nibs--and I wonder if that's part of the reason that so many people dislike it and/or think the 2000 writes wide. Here are some comparisons to illustrate:
lamycomparison.png
(for the record, the VP & the 2000 are loaded with Legal Lapis, the falcon with Lamy Blue-Black, the Esterbrook with Noodler's black, and the Safari with Baystate Blue)

To my eye the 2000 EF with light pressure is in the same ballpark as the Falcon SF and maybe a hair thinner than the 9461 (manifold fine). With moderate pressure the 2000 EF widens up to approximate the VP ItaliFine (the fine side, note that it's adjusted for heavy flow) or the Safari EF (handicapped by the Baystate Blue, which makes anything wider). Under heavy pressure the 2000 EF writes like the Safari M (which is like a sharpie with the Baystate Blue in it).

For actual handwriting I find the springiness to yield nice line variation:
lamyscript.png

At the end of the day, I'm quite happy with this pen. It's reliable, it's a great accessory for times when too much bling would be inappropriate, and it writes well.

Edited by MYU, 13 October 2008 - 03:57.


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#2 nolagraph

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 23:53

These are some interesting findings. From all the chatter on the forum I was under the impression that the 2000 EF was like trying to write with a Sharpie. I had kind of given up on them, at least until I had the dough (and patience) to buy one and send it to a nibmeister right off the bat. I may have to start looking more closely at one.

#3 mike189

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 00:13


I agree with the above observations 100%.

I've just received a Lamy 2000 from Pengallery. I ordered a EF nib because of all the
comments on how wide the nib wrote and find it much finer than expected.

If I just rest the pen in my hand and draw a line it is very fine and light; with my normal
writing which I think is very light handed, the line is much darker and thicker. With just a
little extra pressure the line is much broader and wetter.

And, as shown above, it really does give great shading and line variation.



#4 thibaulthalpern

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 00:24

I don't know about the Lamy 2000, but my Lamy Studio with EF nib writes about as thick (and ugly) a line as your Lamy Studio. They use the exact same nib, as I understand.

So, anyone who desires Japanese Fines or even a Rotring XF, stay far away from the Lamy Studio/Safari EF.

You can also read more about my rant here:
http://www.fountainp...n...c=78699&hl=
:-) Hehehehe...cheers!
m( _ _ )m (– , –) \ (^_^) /

#5 stevo

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 02:02

I don't think it's a fair comparison unless you have the same ink in the pens you are comparing...

However, your point about line variation is exactly what I experience with my 2000. In fact, you get a lot of variation with the medium, but a little less with the fine that I have. I'm guessing tha the rate of EF or F 2000 nibs writing like a medium or broad are not as prevelant as we would gather from all the comments.

Also, Legal Lapis will add width to your line unless you have a very dry writer.

S

#6 mstone

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Posted 09 October 2008 - 10:18

QUOTE (stevo @ Oct 8 2008, 10:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think it's a fair comparison unless you have the same ink in the pens you are comparing...


Undoubtedly; the main focus was on the variation of the EF based on pressure, the other samples are just to give people a reference point (it's hard to judge the width of a line blown up 100x). Certainly, the ink also has a strong effect (but flushing all the pens and refilling would have been too much work)--but it probably tilts toward a wider 2000 than anything else (certainly the legal lapis is wetter than the blue-black in the falcon).

#7 Juan in Andalucia

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Posted 10 October 2008 - 18:48

You made a very good point, and I agree with you; the Lamy 2000 is very sensitive to writing presure. I call it "writing dynamics" using an analogy from guitar playing slang.

Juan

#8 AviSz

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 00:14

thanks for the review



#9 AviSz

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 00:15

thanks for the review








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