Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Le Boeuf pens, what do you know about them?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Onion

Onion

    Blues ain't nothin' but a party!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 351 posts

Posted 08 February 2006 - 01:59

My friend Paco got a Le Boeuf pen from a co worker, anyone have any info on them.

edit: sorry didn't see that he had posted on this already. although he hasn't yet got a response.

Edited by Johnny Mannion, 08 February 2006 - 02:00.


Sponsored Content

#2 Bill D

Bill D

    Marshwiggle

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Maryland, USA (Chesapeake Bay)
  • Flag:

Posted 08 February 2006 - 02:14

I have a Le Boeuf "Unbreakable", but I don't know much about it or the company. Mine has a cracked nib, so stays put away carefully in a drawer instead of out with the pens I use. I found it packed away with the things that had belonged to my great uncle.

I will be interested to hear what you and your friend learn.

Bill

#3 Bill D

Bill D

    Marshwiggle

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Maryland, USA (Chesapeake Bay)
  • Flag:

Posted 08 February 2006 - 02:49

Googling turned up a little information. The original company was only around from 1921 to 1933. Check out
LeBoeuf and
Glenn's LeBoeuf info

Bill

#4 Richard

Richard

    WWII Warbird Fan

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,398 posts
  • Location:The Nashua Pen Spa
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2006 - 12:34

I just resurrected a LeBoeuf this week. It's a pen I killed about three years ago; then, I didn't have the ability to fix it after I broke it. Since I do now, I dragged the bag of parts out and did the necessary. Wonderful pens, LeBoeuf, probably best known for their quality and their filling system (the ones that aren't lever fillers, that is). Here's my new baby:

Posted Image
Click to send email: richard@richardspens.com
Posted Image

#5 weepstah

weepstah

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 79 posts

Posted 27 July 2006 - 13:18

Here's what I know about Le Boeuf -

1) Frank Le Boeuf patented (I believe) a process that allowed him to create some very unusual celluoids for his pens.

2) Le Boeufs are among the highest valued vintage pens - due to their high quality, unusual plastics, and I'm not sure what else.

3) Le Boeufs were only produced from the early 1920's until around 1931.

weepstah
"My shoes were reasonably clean, my rent was paid and I had two boxes of cereal and plenty of coffee at home. The world was mine, and I had plenty of time."

#6 weepstah

weepstah

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 79 posts

Posted 27 July 2006 - 13:18

Here's what I know about Le Boeuf -

1) Frank Le Boeuf patented (I believe) a process that allowed him to create some very unusual celluoids for his pens.

2) Le Boeufs are among the highest valued vintage pens - due to their high quality, unusual plastics, and I'm not sure what else.

3) Le Boeufs were only produced from the early 1920's until around 1931.

weepstah
"My shoes were reasonably clean, my rent was paid and I had two boxes of cereal and plenty of coffee at home. The world was mine, and I had plenty of time."

#7 Johnny Appleseed

Johnny Appleseed

    Collector of Eclectic Knowledge

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,798 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest, USA

Posted 27 July 2006 - 16:26

Le Boeuf pens are very desireable pens - it is hard to even touch one on ebay for less than a couple of hundred. They are nice, solid, well made pens. There is a guy in the Seattle pen club with a thumb-filler in Brown marble. If your friend got one from a co-worker he lucked out.

I have a thumb filler on my dream list. Richard - that one is to die for!

I think there is a lot of hisory when it comes to LeBoeuf. They are possibly the first colored celluloid pens (CS Dinkie's being the other candidate). They were also part, I believe, of some sort of weird stock scam - I seem to recall something about investors being taken past a big empty factory with a "LeBeouf Pen" sign, while the pens were being made out of a garage - but that might be urban legend.

John
So if you have a lot of ink,
You should get a Yink, I think.

- Dr Suess

Always looking for pens by Baird-North, Charles Ingersoll, and nibs marked "CHI"

#8 TheNobleSavage

TheNobleSavage

    Antique

  • FPN Supporter - Platinum

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,622 posts
  • Location:Guadeloupe, CA
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2006 - 16:42

Le Boeuf was briefly resurrected and died a few years ago.

TNS
Check Out my Fountain Pen and Ink Review Sites
Fountain Pen Reviews
Ink Reviews

#9 Richard

Richard

    WWII Warbird Fan

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,398 posts
  • Location:The Nashua Pen Spa
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2006 - 17:27

Le Boeuf was briefly resurrected and died a few years ago.

Yeah, that resurrection was a wicked shame. Cheap gaudy pens, horribly made.
Click to send email: richard@richardspens.com
Posted Image

#10 Ruaidhri

Ruaidhri

    Ruaidhrí

  • FPN Hon. Admin

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,918 posts
  • Location:Dublin, Ireland
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2006 - 17:44

Richard

Are you deliberately trying to wind me up showing pictures like that ?
My right hand is clutching spasmodically at the screen.
I need a LeBoeuf like a hole in the head but............... :o
Administrator and Proprietor of Murphy Towers

#11 andyr7

andyr7

    Dinkie lover .......

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 753 posts

Posted 27 July 2006 - 20:39

They are possibly the first colored celluloid pens (CS Dinkie's being the other candidate).

It would be nice to prove it, one way or another!

There is firm evidence for coloured Dinkies by 1924 but indirect evidence as far back as possibly 1922. Does anyone have similar dates for the LeBoeuf pens?

Andy

#12 meanwhile

meanwhile

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,831 posts

Posted 27 July 2006 - 21:47

Ok - we know enough to say that Paco is a very lucky guy!
- Jonathan

#13 Richard

Richard

    WWII Warbird Fan

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,398 posts
  • Location:The Nashua Pen Spa
  • Flag:

Posted 28 July 2006 - 03:50

They are possibly the first colored celluloid pens (CS Dinkie's being the other candidate).

It would be nice to prove it, one way or another!

There is firm evidence for coloured Dinkies by 1924 but indirect evidence as far back as possibly 1922. Does anyone have similar dates for the LeBoeuf pens?

Andy

In 1919, Frank LeBoeuf received a patent covering his process for making pen bodies from celluloid tubing, and he appears to have been manufacturing celluloid pens in 1920, before he incorporated his company in 1921.
Click to send email: richard@richardspens.com
Posted Image

#14 andyr7

andyr7

    Dinkie lover .......

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 753 posts

Posted 28 July 2006 - 19:19

In 1919, Frank LeBoeuf received a patent covering his process for making pen bodies from celluloid tubing, and he appears to have been manufacturing celluloid pens in 1920, before he incorporated his company in 1921.

Still no firm evidence, though, we really need to see some receipts or advertising indicating that various colours were available. And didn't I read somewhere that the first celluloid tube pens were black anyway?

I'm not particularly stating the case for Dinkies being the first to be made in colours (though I think you'd be hard pressed to find an earlier yellow pen), it is just that hard evidence of early coloured pens seems very elusive and I'd really like to know more!

Andy


#15 Hirsch

Hirsch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 119 posts

Posted 19 August 2008 - 15:13

I just came across an interesting pen that appears to show the end of the story. The clip is marked "Pilgrim". However, the imprint reads "LeBoeuf-Pilgrim Pen Company, Springfield Mass" (or something close to that; I'm not looking at the pen right now). Springfield is the correct location for LeBoeuf manufacture. The filling system is a "thumb filler", but not the usual one from LeBoeuf. The whole barrel (and it's a long pen) pulls back, and there's a glass viewing window below the filler, which shows a breathing tube going up into the sac. So, this pen, which would appear to be the end of the line for vintage LeBoeuf, used an aerometric filler almost identical to that used in the Parker 51...but LeBoeuf had been long gone by the appearance of the 51. I have no idea what the story with LeBoeuf-Pilgrim is. Possible merger or acquisition by another company? I'll add a picture if time permits.

#16 Juan in Andalucia

Juan in Andalucia

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 953 posts

Posted 19 August 2008 - 15:25

QUOTE (andyr7 @ Jul 27 2006, 08:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
They are possibly the first colored celluloid pens (CS Dinkie's being the other candidate).

It would be nice to prove it, one way or another!

There is firm evidence for coloured Dinkies by 1924 but indirect evidence as far back as possibly 1922. Does anyone have similar dates for the LeBoeuf pens?

Andy


I don't know whether LeB were the first colored celluloid, but they were one of the earliest, and IMHO one of the most beautiful celluloid pens. Too bad I don't have any.

Juan


#17 Hirsch

Hirsch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 119 posts

Posted 20 August 2008 - 21:32

Here are pictures of the LeBoeuf-Pilgrim pen. This looks unlike any other LeBoeuf I've seen. Comments are welcome.





#18 skipwilliams

skipwilliams

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts

Posted 21 August 2008 - 13:39

I guess it depends on whether the pen was new or old. As Richard points out, the new pens were god-awful. The 20's pens were spectacular examples of that golden age. LeBoeuf had some of the prettiest celluloids of the day, many not used on other US makers' pens and highly prized today.

Skip


QUOTE (Onion @ Feb 8 2006, 01:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My friend Paco got a Le Boeuf pen from a co worker, anyone have any info on them.

edit: sorry didn't see that he had posted on this already. although he hasn't yet got a response.


Skip Williams
www.skipwilliams.com/blog

#19 RevAaron

RevAaron

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,931 posts

Posted 21 August 2008 - 15:04

Wow, that LeBoeuf-Pilgrim is really gorgeous!


WTB: Ford's Patent Pen, Pilot Blue ink (Thai)
Also: Orthos Pens | Danish MB #4 nib | 1G Hundred Year Pen cap







Sponsored Content




|