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Review of the Hero Thuya Laquer Italic Pen


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Randal6393

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    Love italic handwriting.

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 02:09

This is a difficult review to write. The pen has many good points and many bad points as well.

The eBay picture of this pen attracted my attention as it is a burgundy (very dark) pen with an imitation wood burl inset. Attractive and eye-catching.



Here are my notes on the pen, written after I tweaked up the tip. Actually, that's a misnomer. I did a full grind on the nib and removed quite a bit of metal to get the pen into shape. The pen tip was rounded on the corners to achieve a stub nib. So I thinned the nib in thickness and width, then ground the nib into a cursive italic shape. All of the grinding upset the flow a bit. I tweaked the nib and feed unit until I got the flow that I wanted.







Here are two more pictures showing the clean lines and excellent workmanship in this pen. For the price, this is quite an impressive pen. However, the italic tip requires so much work to get the pen in shape, I can't recommend it to anyone who is not experienced with regrinding and reworking nibs. For the same price ($24.99), one may buy other pens that are pretty much ready to write out of the box. This is a real shame, as the pen represents a decent try to meet the needs of the Western pen market by Asian manufacturers. I hope that Singapore is successful in working the bugs out of this product.








Filled the pen with Mont Blanc Violet. The flow is heavy enough that the ink is dark and shading is subtle. Quickly becoming the pen that I use for most of my casual correspondence.

Edited by Randal6393, 28 August 2008 - 02:16.

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


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#2 Readymade

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 05:29

QUOTE (Randal6393 @ Aug 28 2008, 10:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I hope that Singapore is successful in working the bugs out of this product.


The pen you reviewed was made in China, not Singapore.

Singapore is not in China.

Please see:

http://www.mapsofwor...cation-map.html

and for basic info:

https://www.cia.gov/...k/print/sn.html
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#3 Maja

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 07:53

Thanks for taking the time to do such a thorough review, Randal, and for the writing samples and pen pictures, too!
I know that these reviews can take a lot of time to do, so I (for one) appreciate them very much smile.gif
(oh, and bonus points for figuring out the amortized cost, per month, of the pen laugh.gif clap1.gif )

It's a handsome-looking pen and I like the inclusion of wood as part of the pen material. Too bad the shipping cost wasn't lower wink.gif
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#4 Randal6393

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 12:39

You are quite correct -- the mental confusion is caused by the fact that the pen, made in China, was posted from Singapore. Or, at least, sent by something called Singapore Post. The reason I said Singapore is because I am under the impression that a merchant in Singapore ordered this pen from a factory in China. Now this could be a mistake on my part. I wwould have to ask Alan Koo for more information. Even though Singapore was 80 % Chinese ancestry the last time I visited, Singapore is not a part of China. I apologize for any misunderstanding my post generated.

My first visit was in 1975. Miss the old food courts. My visits to Singapore were very short -- a few days each -- so I did not get to see as much of the city as I would like to have seen. First visit, I bought a Casio calculator from a Sikh shopkeeper. The calculator was a full generation ahead of anything sold in the US at that time.

Last time I was in Singapore was in 1995. Wife, daughter, and I were on holiday. Went up the Peninsula via train, then van into Thailand. Fascinating sights. If we could have had a few more weeks, we might have made it into China. Amazing how many things to do and to see when one is traveling.

One thing that has remained constant about Singapore: The country does a lot of trading and merchandising of all kinds. Hope that continues unabated as economic prosperity is the basis for so many things the world needs right now.

QUOTE (Readymade @ Aug 28 2008, 01:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Randal6393 @ Aug 28 2008, 10:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I hope that Singapore is successful in working the bugs out of this product.


The pen you reviewed was made in China, not Singapore.

Singapore is not in China.

Please see:

http://www.mapsofwor...cation-map.html

and for basic info:

https://www.cia.gov/...k/print/sn.html


Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#5 Aysedasi

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 12:48

I just wish I had the skill to do the type of nib adjustments you mention Randal. I'd be petrified of ruining the nib......

#6 Randal6393

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 13:44

Believe me, after you ruin the first one or two, you get used to it. crybaby.gif It's all a matter of experience. Rarely do I goof up a nib now -- and am getting practice in flow adjustment as well. Was fortunate in that I acquired a number of pens that were in the "almost there" category -- they would be great pens, if only they had a wider nib or sharper tip or ... well, some of them were salvageable. Some were not. headsmack.gif

Take a look at my website, that will give you an idea of what can be done with a few good (or even not-so-good) stones. The real problem when doing grinding by hand is to keep the grind even and hitting every stroke exactly where you want it. That calls for a good magnifying lens and lots of light plus patience and practice.thumbup.gif


QUOTE (Aysedasi @ Aug 28 2008, 08:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just wish I had the skill to do the type of nib adjustments you mention Randal. I'd be petrified of ruining the nib......

Edited by Randal6393, 28 August 2008 - 13:55.

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#7 Randal6393

Randal6393

    Love italic handwriting.

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 13:54

Yes, the shipping cost is high. And the fact that it was three weeks to get the pen hurt as well. Still, a good medium to heavy weight pen for $25.00 isn't bad.

Oh, the wood is a plastic insert with an imitation of a wood burl on it. Not really wood but a classy inset that has to be looked at real close to detect that it's not wood. The thing that impresses me is that the rings, inset, and cap body are all smooth, without any pits or protrusions to ruin the effect. I have seen several attempts to get that right on a variety of items. And this one is the best I have seen.

QUOTE (Maja @ Aug 28 2008, 03:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for taking the time to do such a thorough review, Randal, and for the writing samples and pen pictures, too!
I know that these reviews can take a lot of time to do, so I (for one) appreciate them very much smile.gif
(oh, and bonus points for figuring out the amortized cost, per month, of the pen laugh.gif clap1.gif )

It's a handsome-looking pen and I like the inclusion of wood as part of the pen material. Too bad the shipping cost wasn't lower wink.gif


Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 







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