Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

C H Ingersoll


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 lovemy51

lovemy51

    legal? of course... and with all my papers. FP-friendly, mostly

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,628 posts
  • Location:near my pens and inks

Posted 20 June 2008 - 06:47

This is my attempt to write a review on a vintage pen that is not talked about much. The first time I heard of it was here at FPN, I think Mister Binder made reference to it on some post, I don't even recall where. I'm not sure how old this pen is and I am not familiar with its history, so you are welcome to fill in those details. Anyways, here it is.

Appearance 4/5
I must say I'm not a fan of flat top or cylindrical cap style, this is why I give it a 4/5. It is a very simple design. It has a reddish brown plastic (??) body with steel clip and twist button at the end of the barrel. This one still has the sticker with $1.00 and instructions how to fill. The top of the cap has a very strong imprint that reads: CHAS. H. INGERSOLL (scrolled) E. ORANGE N.J. The button/dial at the end of the barrel shows you how to turn the knob to fill the pen. With two arrows: counter clock wise to empty and clock wise to fill.

Size and weight 5/5
Very comfortable light weight, but by all means, not a small pen. It measures 4 7/8 capped and 6 1/8 posted.

Filling system 5/5
"Twist fill". I'm not to sure how convenient this system is, but I tell you is very interesting. Apparently, the sac is glued to both the section and the knob at the end of the barrel. When one twists the knob/dial counter clock wise, the sac twist releasing the air and emptying the sac. When twist the other way, obviously, takes the ink in the sac. Fascinating! Will see how it holds.

Nib 4/5
Medium 14K. the iridium tip is worn out, but not completely. Still writes very smoothly. It reads CHI and 14K. Although not toothy at all, you can feel the paper under it. this nib has a little bit of flex also.

Cost and Value 5/5
I was told by the seller that these pens were not very expensive when they were made... heck, the sticker says $1.00. I was able to acquire this baby for $24 USD (plus $4 shipping charges). I can not compare this to any other Ingersoll pen, cos' I don't see too many of them out there, so I thought it was a good buy. I'm very happy that I was able to get a pen that is rare and in such a good condition.

In conclusion: 4.6/5 aint bad!!!

Well, now I'm hoping you guys and gals can help me by giving me more details on the history of this pen.

I'm posting some pics (pardon my bad pic taking abilities)

Attached Images

  • pens_015.jpg

Edited by lovemy51, 20 June 2008 - 07:45.


Sponsored Content

#2 goodguy

goodguy

    Fountain pens and watches collector

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,534 posts
  • Location:Toronto Canada
  • Flag:

Posted 20 June 2008 - 09:40

Are you sure this is a plastic body and not Ebonite ?

Nice review and very interesting pen
Thanks

Edited by goodguy, 20 June 2008 - 09:43.

Respect to all

#3 Johnny Appleseed

Johnny Appleseed

    Collector of Eclectic Knowledge

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,798 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest, USA

Posted 20 June 2008 - 16:05

Oh Goodguy - this is definitely not ebonite.

The material of this pen is Bakelite. It is one of the few pens that were ever made, and mass-produced, in Bakelite. Parker experimented with transparent bakalite in the lucky curve pens around 1918-1919 or so, and Dunn made some transparent bakelite pens. The stuff is brittle and difficult to work with - be careful, it will crack if you look at it wrong, especially around the section. On the upside, it is totally impervious to chemicals, heat (you can hit it with a blow-torch and it will eventually get damaged) etc.

These date from approximately 1928-1930, maybe 1931 (they were out of business by 1932), and yes, this model was the dollar pen. Charles Ingersoll was the seceratary and general manager of the Robert Ingersoll and Bro. Dollar Watch company from the late 1800s till 1922. In 1922 they ran into financial difficulty and were forced by their creditors to sell the company to the Waterbury clock company. Charles moved to Newark and started the Charles Ingersoll Dollar pen co in 1924. The original dollar pens were nickel-plated brass twist-fillers, but they started making models in Celluloid in 1927 and Bakelite in 1928.

They are nice pens. I was eying that particular one myself. (Need to get my paypal balance back in shape. . .)

Here is your pen:

(with thanks to Richard Binder for image editing)

A few of the metal versions:


Celluloid:


And Bakelite:


John


So if you have a lot of ink,
You should get a Yink, I think.

- Dr Suess

Always looking for pens by Baird-North, Charles Ingersoll, and nibs marked "CHI"

#4 lovemy51

lovemy51

    legal? of course... and with all my papers. FP-friendly, mostly

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,628 posts
  • Location:near my pens and inks

Posted 20 June 2008 - 16:12

hi guys,

notice how i wrote question marks next to plastic. i knew about bakelite, but i wasn't sure if that was the material used on this pen.

nice collection John! mine is exactly like the bottom tray (style: forth from the left, color: third from the left, mottled reddish brown). and thanx for the history and info, i knew you you would post!!!... after i did the review last night, i did a search and found you had talked about this pen here at FPN.

regards,

Edited by lovemy51, 20 June 2008 - 16:30.


#5 Maja

Maja

    Fan of colourful pens

  • FPN Hon. Admin

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,416 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, Canada
  • Flag:

Posted 21 June 2008 - 08:03

lovemy51, thanks so much for the review! It seems like every tenth vintage pen for sale on eBay is a "bakelite" pen....but yours truly is!

Johnny A, thanks (as always) for the pen history post !
That green flat top of yours looks right at home with his/her "cousins".... wink.gif


Vancouver (B.C) Pen Club (our website)

#6 lovemy51

lovemy51

    legal? of course... and with all my papers. FP-friendly, mostly

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,628 posts
  • Location:near my pens and inks

Posted 22 June 2008 - 08:00

thanx maja, i was happy to get something this nice, rare and in working order!!

#7 cooltouch

cooltouch

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 93 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 03 December 2010 - 08:08

I'm resurrecting this very stale thread to ask a question -- sorry if it's the wrong forum for asking it, but the photos above are a big help in explaining what pen I have and what I'm looking for. I have a Chas. H. Ingersoll pen that, in John's post #3, is closest to the 2nd from the left in his bottom image, except mine has a cap band and is basically the same coloring as the pen 3rd from the left. My Ingersoll is missing the twist knob on the bottom -- and the sac is gone, of course. I'm hoping to find a replacement or substitute twist knob. Anybody know where I might be able to find one? I'm also wondering how difficult it is to anchor the ink sac to the knob (I've replaced sacs before, but this is a new one for me). And one last question: the two "tacks" that hold the clip onto the cap have backed off a bit, so the clip is loose. I was thinking I might try lightly tapping them back in place, but then I read the note above about bakelite being very brittle, so now I'm thinking I'd better not, and I'm wondering about an alternate method. Maybe fill the cap full of fine sand (so it won't compress) and, using a piece of bike inner tube and pliers, squeeze the tacks back in place? Also, the section appears stuck, so any precautions I might should take when removing it to replace the sac would be appreciated. I've never dealt with bakelite pens before.

I've actually enjoyed using my Ingersoll as a dip pen. The nib is moderately flexible, which makes for some interesting writing, and I'd like to put the pen into my rotation. It's also kind of cool looking in a sort of clunky way.
Michael

#8 lovemy51

lovemy51

    legal? of course... and with all my papers. FP-friendly, mostly

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,628 posts
  • Location:near my pens and inks

Posted 04 December 2010 - 06:13

I'm resurrecting this very stale thread to ask a question -- sorry if it's the wrong forum for asking it, but the photos above are a big help in explaining what pen I have and what I'm looking for. I have a Chas. H. Ingersoll pen that, in John's post #3, is closest to the 2nd from the left in his bottom image, except mine has a cap band and is basically the same coloring as the pen 3rd from the left. My Ingersoll is missing the twist knob on the bottom -- and the sac is gone, of course. I'm hoping to find a replacement or substitute twist knob. Anybody know where I might be able to find one? I'm also wondering how difficult it is to anchor the ink sac to the knob (I've replaced sacs before, but this is a new one for me). And one last question: the two "tacks" that hold the clip onto the cap have backed off a bit, so the clip is loose. I was thinking I might try lightly tapping them back in place, but then I read the note above about bakelite being very brittle, so now I'm thinking I'd better not, and I'm wondering about an alternate method. Maybe fill the cap full of fine sand (so it won't compress) and, using a piece of bike inner tube and pliers, squeeze the tacks back in place? Also, the section appears stuck, so any precautions I might should take when removing it to replace the sac would be appreciated. I've never dealt with bakelite pens before.

I've actually enjoyed using my Ingersoll as a dip pen. The nib is moderately flexible, which makes for some interesting writing, and I'd like to put the pen into my rotation. It's also kind of cool looking in a sort of clunky way.


hi cooltouch! all i can say is, replacing the sac is fun. i've already replaced mine. if i remember correctly,
1) once you have all the parts glued together (section, sac and nut [where the nob screws on]), place them inside the barrel.
2) now stick a fine screwdriver thru the section (nib and feed have to come off). the screwdriver then holds the nut at the back end of the barrel and one can screw the nob onto the nut from the outside.
3) finally, replace the feed and nib.

i know, it sounds more complicated than it really is!... or maybe i made sound complicated... :hmm1:

as far as where to get parts and all that... man, i have no idea. I can get you a name of someone that can help. PM me if you like more info.






Sponsored Content




|