Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Lamy 2000, F


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 Tsujigiri

Tsujigiri

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 24 March 2008 - 21:40

This pen is often recommended on FPN as a form follows function type of pen. I had overlooked it in all the pen catalogues and websites because of its subdued appearance. For $150, I wanted something that looked a lot nicer. But after seeing all the praise for it on FPN, I was convinced to give it a try.



Build Quality: 9/10

Itís a simple design, so thereís not that much that can go wrong. Iíve heard that Lamyís quality control is slipping, but this particular specimen was flawless. The seams are minimized, the parts fit together well, the lines are smooth and confident. The clip is a solid piece of metal that is spring loaded, and opens if pressure is applied to the top. The cap clicks on firmly and comes off easily, held in place by a small springy ring in the body. There are no indications that this pen is anything other than solidly built. The box is also nice, a small, hinged, aluminum container with some cardboard lining inside. The outside features the Lamy logo imprinted in the metal, and the warranty is contained inside, claiming ďKein Design schreibt besser,Ē or ďno design writes better.Ē A simple, utilitarian statement.



Grip, Balance, and Feel: 8/10

The width is good, and the matte finish makes the pen feel very comfortable and smooth in the hand, unlike gloss finishes that stick to skin. The finish does not get slippery as easily, does not pick up fingerprints, and feels very natural. The taper of the pen at the grip is also nice, and the balance is perfect posted or unposted. Some have complained that they cannot post their 2000, but this one seems to be able to, even if not as easily as it could. This would be just about the perfect feel in the handÖ. If it werenít for those clips that everyone complains about. These complaints are certainly justified, those little metal pieces that hold the cap on are uncomfortable to have under your fingers. Itís not the worst grip there is, but it is extremely annoying that Lamy build the positioned the clips in the worst possible manner (no exaggeration), right where youíre most likely to have your fingers. To avoid them, you have to either resort to holding the pen unusually far back, or cramping your fingers up at the tip of the grip. This is a major design flaw in the pen; there are so many better ways to keep the cap on. If Lamy had even rotated the clips so that they were vertical instead of on the sides, they wouldnít interfere with the fingers. But alas, they cut notches into the sides so that they always end up horizontally arrangedÖ



Filling System: 7/10

Piston filling, nice. This type of filling is becoming scarce as pen companies strive to build fountain pens for people who hate fountain pens and canít be bothered to do anything beyond popping a cartridge in, so itís nice to see a piston fill on this pen. The knob is big enough for a good grip, and the mechanism seems well-built enough. Many people complain of stiffness, but I didnít feel that it was inordinately so. My Montblanc 149 is stiffer. The nib is hooded, so thereís a minimal amount of wiping after filling. But hereís the other common major complaint about this pen: the ink windows. The ink level is very hard to read because the ink windows are too small, the finish is matte, and the ink sticks to the inside of the barrel. The matte finish is an understandable sacrifice, but the size of the ink windows is inexcusable. For some reason, when I look at the ink windows, the ink chamber appears as a thin tube inside a clear sleeve, which means that itís even harder to see how much ink there is in that thin tube. To check the ink is a long process of waiting for it to settle and holding it up to a very bright light, so I donít do it very often. Then, by the time I notice that the ink window is looking lighter, itís too late.



Nib: 9/10

This is a smooth nib that writes very well. Itís understated, and doesnít look like much, but itís a 14k platinum-plated hooded affair that is best appreciated when it is in use. A few sources have mentioned interchangeability, but I have never seen Lamy 2000 nib units for sale, so donít count on it. Also, since there are no size indications on the nib (or any markings), changing nibs might be more trouble than itís worth. I have also heard that Lamy 2000 nibs run a size wide, but this has not been true in my case; my fine is about the size of a Sailor MF, or most Western fines.

[

Value: 8/10

Itís a well-built piston filler with a 14k gold nib, so the $150 list price seems reasonable. It can usually be found for around $100 from cheaper sources. Even with that, I donít get the feeling that the 2000 is a steal, or a remarkable value. It is stripped of all extras, and the gold nib is small due to its hooded nature. Itís priced in the range of the Sailor 1911m, which feels like a nicer pen, has a far superior nib, and some more trim details. I do like Lamyís functional approach with the pen, but it seems like it should be a little cheaper. Itís a pen that doesnít leave me feeling strongly either way about its value, so itís a reasonable buy.



Conclusion:

I canít help but wonder, is this really a form follows function pen, or is it just intended to evoke that impression through a minimalist style? It certainly is utilitarian to some extent, but if it was a true utilitarian pen, it seems that they would have made more functional ink windows, a more comfortable grip, and a more populous-minded price. Second to my considerations: what is the intrinsic value of a minimalistic fountain pen? When I use this pen, it seems like a novel and fun departure from the typical old-fashioned pens I use, but the excitement of this pen wears off faster than it does for the others. And isnít the purpose of a fountain pen rather than a ballpoint to add character to writing, to make it more than just a necessary function or daily chore? This pen doesnít even look like very much like a fountain pen. But despite that, I like the pen, and find it an interesting and unique writing instrument.




Sponsored Content

#2 AndyHayes

AndyHayes

    Too Many Pens

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,536 posts
  • Location:Shetland UK
  • Flag:

Posted 24 March 2008 - 22:04

Thanks for the review. It's always good to see people making the effort.

I have one of these and it is a great pen. Mine went back to Lamy for a nib swap and to sort out the stiff piston. It now sports an OM nib and it is utterly reliable. You will appreciate its toughness in time when your other pens become tarnished. This is the time that the real value will show through.

If the pen goes wrong Lamy fix them free of charge, further adding to the value.

I have heard people complaining about the ears poking into their fingers. I can feel them, just, and I start to wonder if those complaining all have a fearsome grip!
Skype: andyhayes

#3 I am not a number

I am not a number

    Missing believed somewhere else.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,973 posts
  • Location:Airstrip One

Posted 24 March 2008 - 22:16

Thanks for a comprehensive review!

As far as I'm concerned the value is in the durability and the customer service (I sent a second-hand marketplace purchased 2000 back to Lamy in Germany where it was totally overhauled for free). As for the design, it's been that way for years, the fact that it is still on the market must count for something. It's my favourite pen for using if I don't want any attention drawn to the fact that I'm using a pen. I keep the bright red urushi Densho for those days...
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of nothing at all...

#4 John Cullen

John Cullen

    John Cullen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,899 posts

Posted 24 March 2008 - 23:31

wow, nice review, thoughtful comments and great photography. This is the one pen I want to try but just can not bring myself to buy. I have a friend who has one and I will try his when I see him this summer. Again, thank you for the time and thought. It is a treat to read such a review. j

#5 Steven

Steven

    Bon Vivant

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  • Location:Sunny San Diego, CA
  • Flag:

Posted 25 March 2008 - 00:27

Great review. I also have a 2000 with fine nib and I like both the look and feel of this pen. I find it light, comfortable, smooth and the styling is very 60's and unique. As far as the ink window it works for me. This pen has been in production for over 40 years and if ain't broke don't fix it.

Avatar painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905) titled La leçon difficile (The difficult lesson)


#6 PAKMAN

PAKMAN

    Say that again, I have a pen here somewhere...

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,790 posts
  • Location:Arkansas, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 25 March 2008 - 00:47

Good review! I held off a long time getting one of these and when I did, I wasn't fully satisfied with it. I hate to send things back to mfgs for repair/tuning so it sat for several months. I went to a pen show 3 weeks ago and brought it with me. A trader came by and said he would be interested in making a trade for it. I caught up with him later and traded even for a Visconti Kaleido Voyager! I was one happy puppy with that deal. Later a fellow came by looking at my pens and wanted one of the Parker 51s I had for sale. I had $100 on it but would probably gone less. He had a 2000 in his pocket and after struggling a while about spending another $100, I asked if he wanted to trade the 2000 for the 51. So I came home with a 2000 and it has been full of ink and in use ever since. Love it!!

PAKMAN
 

minibanner.gif             fpn_1321906507__vanness_sign.jpg 

                  My Favorite Pen Restorer                            My favorite Brick and Mortar              

                                                                   now selling online!


#7 langere

langere

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,602 posts
  • Location:Alexandria, Virginia
  • Flag:

Posted 25 March 2008 - 01:33

Thanks for the great review! You clearly state the advantages and disadvantages of the Lamy 2000. I purchased one a while ago, but still haven't had the chance to use it. But now I'm looking forward to it even more.

Erick

Pelikan Souverän M 815 "F" nib running Pelikan Königsblau 

PENBBS 500 "F" nib running Iroshizuku Murasaki-Shikibu

Pilot Juliet "F" nib running Diamine Autumn Oak

 

 


#8 MYU

MYU

    ... The key to it all is Capillary Action! ...

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,647 posts
  • Location:On a cliff, looking at NYC
  • Flag:

Posted 25 March 2008 - 02:23

Very nice review--thanks for posting it!

I had reviewed this pen as well and I'm in full agreement with you about the ink windows--they are too small. If anything, the surface should have been polished so that the level would be easier to read. And I think Lamy could have doubled the window thickness towards the section, so that there would still be continuous black with the cap on. However, if you hold the nib upright on an angle for about 5-10 seconds, the ink usually recedes enough for you to get a sense of the level. Besides--the reservoir holds so much ink, you won't run out very often. smile.gif

As for grip, a larger hand would find it just right... Unfortunately, Lamy didn't find a sweet spot with the barrel thickness, as Parker did with the 51.

I have to say that I was expecting I'd use the pen a lot, but I find myself drawn to the classy vintage look of the Lamy 27m. But I do plan to get my nib tuned so that it writes a little finer and that may get me to write with it more often.

I'll be interested to see a follow-up in a few months to see how the pen is holding up for you. biggrin.gif Enjoy!

Edited by MYU, 25 March 2008 - 02:25.

[MYU's Pen Review Corner]   |   "The Common Ground" -- Jeffrey Small


#9 sbullock

sbullock

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 171 posts

Posted 25 March 2008 - 02:45

i dont even feel the clutch prongs on my 2000

#10 Shelley

Shelley

    iPen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,515 posts

Posted 25 March 2008 - 02:53

The window has never bothered me, in fact I hardly ever use the windows on my pens, but then I always carry severall, so if I run out of one ink I can just grab another pen.

I have never noticed the ears, but then I do not grip the pen tightly, and when not in the office I use my hands for gardening, cooking, martial arts, car and motorbike mechanics...everyday New Zealand stuff, so I may have rougher hands than you.

However I think the pen will grow on you-its a keeper for me!
Lamy 2000-Lamy Vista-Visconti Van Gogh Maxi Tortoise Demonstrator-Pilot Vanishing Point Black Carbonesque-1947 Parker 51 Vacumatic Cedar Blue Double Jewel-Aurora Optima Black Chrome Cursive Italic-Waterman Hemisphere Metallic Blue-Sheaffer Targa-Conway Stewart CS475

#11 Tsujigiri

Tsujigiri

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 25 March 2008 - 20:02

Thank you for all your comments. In response to Shelley and MYU, I've had the pen for 3 months now, so I don't think that my opinion of it will change too much. I wanted to give the pen a little time so I didn't just write a rave review of the newest pen before I'd gotten a chance to look at it objectively. But I do like the pen, and the prongs aren't a huge problem. It's just that they seem like they're teasing me by marring what would otherwise be a perfect gripping surface. The rough hands idea is certainly very possible, I don't play any instruments or do anything else to build calluses up on my fingers.
It's odd to think that such a futuristically-styled pen is one of the older designs out there. But it is a good design overall. Also, for some reason, it's one of the two pens of mine that have gotten noticed by other people, the other being a Sailor 1911m. I wouldn't expect that from a low-profile pen like this. I'd think that the MB149 would get more attention, but I'm not complaining. That's not the reason I got the 149 anyway.

#12 Juan in Andalucia

Juan in Andalucia

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 953 posts

Posted 25 March 2008 - 22:52

Very good review. I have 2 Lamy 2000; one a F, the other EF, but they write the same (like a parker or waterman F). As you say, some post, and others don't; that's the case with mines, but then I rarely post a pen.

The ink window... when you get used to fill this pen on a regular basis, you'll forget there's an ink window. This pen holds a lot of ink, and if I needed more than one filling a day I'd consider I'm suffering from hypergraphia.

One of the things I like the most about the 2000 is how responsive the nib is. Being a semihooded nib it has great line width variation and shading (I'm filling it with pelikan black).

A classic and a winner.

#13 WillSW

WillSW

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,449 posts

Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:46

Every time I come back to my 2000 I am overwhelmed with a warm appreciation of the pen, none of my other pens do this. Lately it's been in rotation with a 51 and a Sapporo, and if the Parker is too hot and the Sailor sometimes too cold, the Lamy is always just right.

Sorry for the porridge analogy. Then again, I also think the 2000 is beautiful (form equal to function, and oh how it functions) and don't really like trim accents.

#14 rollerboy

rollerboy

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 696 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 26 March 2008 - 22:55

A well written and illustrated review. Good job overall. And it's fair to state potential drawbacks such as the clips, but ...

QUOTE
If it werenít for those clips that everyone complains about. These complaints are certainly justified, those little metal pieces that hold the cap on are uncomfortable to have under your fingers. Itís not the worst grip there is, but it is extremely annoying that Lamy build the positioned the clips in the worst possible manner (no exaggeration), right where youíre most likely to have your fingers. To avoid them, you have to either resort to holding the pen unusually far back, or cramping your fingers up at the tip of the grip.


Now. Now. Not *everyone* complains about the clips. Also, me thinks you overstate with "most likely to have your fingers". Substitute "where I place my fingers" (I'll be sheepish if you whip out your survey of 1000 pen users accurate to 95% 19 times out of 20!). In case you can't tell, the clips don't bother me. I hold the pen forward of the clips ... and would dispute the "cramped up" characterization.

With regards to the ink window ... I figured out how to use it (well, posts here on FPN described how to use it). I much prefer it to having to disassemble the pen. I think it's a reasonable compromise between utility and retaining the sleek minimal look of the pen.

I've said here on FPN before that if I were to have only one pen, it would be the Lamy 2K, but ... I don't think it's perfect. If I were going to raise an issue (and by issue I mean an area that keeps the pen from being perfect, not an outright problem), it's with the nib. Yes, it's pleasant and smooth (but just reasonably so - I wouldn't heap glass or butter superlatives on it) but the line formed I find is a tad ... I'm not sure how to describe it ... "imprecise" might be the word.

Edited by rollerboy, 26 March 2008 - 22:58.


#15 John Cullen

John Cullen

    John Cullen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,899 posts

Posted 26 March 2008 - 23:29

Pakmanpony------so what is the difference between the two pens? Is it the nib? j

#16 cmeisenzahl

cmeisenzahl

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,261 posts

Posted 27 March 2008 - 13:11

Great review, nice work!

#17 Garageboy

Garageboy

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,494 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn NY

Posted 29 March 2008 - 04:19

The clips don't bother me often, but it woulda been nice if they move it off axis so its not RIGHT under where most people grab the pen

#18 pupjoint

pupjoint

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Gold

  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 29 March 2008 - 07:35

nice review, i had the same 2000 F nib since May last year, no complaints, but then i am an amateur when it comes to pens.

i like the design.

i think they had a price hike over in the last few months, i got it for USD110 last yearfrom a dealer and the last time i checked it was USD150.

#19 vdakker

vdakker

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Gold

  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 02 April 2008 - 19:18

QUOTE(pupjoint @ Mar 29 2008, 07:35 AM) View Post
nice review, i had the same 2000 F nib since May last year, no complaints, but then i am an amateur when it comes to pens.

i like the design.

i think they had a price hike over in the last few months, i got it for USD110 last yearfrom a dealer and the last time i checked it was USD150.


I checked the Lamy website: suggested retail price did not change recently. It's probably caused by the US dollar weakening against Euro.



#20 PigsEye

PigsEye

    bahhumbug

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 90 posts

Posted 02 April 2008 - 19:43

QUOTE(John Cullen @ Mar 26 2008, 06:29 PM) View Post
Pakmanpony------so what is the difference between the two pens? Is it the nib? j


Knowing my luck, if that had been me, it would have ended up being the pen I started out the day with. hmm1.gif

I've got an XF. I like the small nibs because I write small. I hate the small nibs because less line variance and shading.

Edited by PigsEye, 02 April 2008 - 19:46.

Don't let the guy with the broom decide how many elephants are going to be in the parade. - Merlin Mann






Sponsored Content




|