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Taccia Staccato


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#21 Deirdre

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 19:01

Sweet!
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#22 CraigR

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 21:51

As of Friday, I am the proud owner of a new Taccia Staccato in Lunar Blue also. I enjoyed the posts here about the pen and once I saw it in person and wrote with it, I was sold. Pictures do not really capture how pretty this pen is. The pen came with a steel medium nib that writes very smoothly and evenly. The first tank of ink is Noodler's Luxury Blue and it seems to like it quite nicely. This is a large pen. I also have a Taccia Doric, fine nib, in Turquoise that is heavier, but the Staccato is longer. Thanks I Am Not A Number for the recommendation. /Craig

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#23 Deirdre

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 21:53

I have a Taccia on backorder, but I can't recall which one I fell for at the last moment. It'll be a surprise!
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#24 John Cullen

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 23:26

craigR is your fine nibbed Taccia steel or gold? If steel, can you comment on the smoothness compared to the medium. thanks, jc

#25 Kakaze

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 00:53

I bought one of these—my first fountain pen!—about a week ago now with a bottle of Ottoman Azure. I got the Starry Night version...it's a beautiful pen but I haven't had any chance to write extensively with it yet. What writing I have done has been quite pleasant, however.

#26 CraigR

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 20:54

QUOTE(John Cullen @ Mar 24 2008, 04:26 PM) View Post
craigR is your fine nibbed Taccia steel or gold? If steel, can you comment on the smoothness compared to the medium. thanks, jc

My Doric is a fine steel nib. I have tried Pelikan Royal Blue ink and it flows nicely with very little scratchiness. When I tried Private Reserve Black Magic Blue, it was less fluid and a little scratchy. Certainly not a problem however. The new Staccato has a steel medium nib and seems be a lush, in that it drinks everything and loves what it drinks. thumbup.gif /Craig

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#27 FrankB

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:56

Thanks for your impressions of the Staccato, Patrick. At this point I have several Taccia FP's, including a Staccato, all with steel nibs. I find the Taccia pens I have to be an excellent value. They are well made and with their "Italian resin" appear to be much more expensive than they are.

My Staccato resembles I am not a number's. I think the color is so tutti frutti it is downright fun. I have a M steel nib on mine, and it writes a fairly true M line. It is smooth and reliable. The pen itself is a nice large handfull that is comfortable and well balanced. I do not doubt that I will get a second.

Edited by FrankB, 26 March 2008 - 12:57.


#28 jonro

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 13:25

How many turns does it take to twist the cap off the barrel of these new Staccatos?

#29 John Cullen

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 14:21

Thanks for the comments on the steel nibs. I got a steel M on mine and a gold M on my Binder edition. Both are a little wet for me but write smoothly. I have been thinking about trying a Fine steel nib. The nice thing is the steel nibs are not expensive. Swisher wrote me and told me they would order me an extra nib in a collar with the feed for about $24. So I guess I should just order a steel nib in Fine point and see how it is.

Jonro---If I hold the barrel in my left hand with the clip facing me and turn the cap off with my right hand, it takes one and one third turns of the cap for it to disengage from the barrel threads. I do not know if mine is an average pen, but that is what it takes.

In comparison, my Pelikan 800 cap takes about 4/5 ths of a turn to come off. My Pilot 823 cap takes almost as much of a turn as the Staccato. My Namiki Bamboo takes about one and 3/4 turns to unscrew. My Omas full sized Paragon takes a little less than the Bamboo. So in comparison to those pens, the Staccato does not take an excessive distance (Iguess that is a relative term) to unscrew.

The Binder LE takes a little more distance to screw on and off if I remember correctly, and if my Binder pen is average if you put your steel nib in the Binder pen the nib will end up with a crunch in the end. Don't ask. j

Edited by John Cullen, 26 March 2008 - 14:24.


#30 hardyb

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 16:24

Got one in Green Ebonite and love it. My third Staccato! (I am a picture borrowing weasel. Credit to Swishers from whom I bought the pen)

Edited by hardyb, 26 March 2008 - 16:30.

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#31 CraigR

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 17:40

QUOTE(jonro @ Mar 26 2008, 06:25 AM) View Post
How many turns does it take to twist the cap off the barrel of these new Staccatos?

One and a quarter turns on mine. For reference, on my Taccia Doric it is one complete turn. /Craig

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#32 donwinn

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 22:00

QUOTE(kiavonne @ Mar 4 2008, 08:00 PM) View Post
I have two Staccatos, one in Honey Bee, and the other in Emerald Green (with red swirls, looks very Christmassy). I've inked the Honey Bee with Walnut. It writes extremely well. BIG pen but lightweight enough for me to use without posting and enjoy the experience. The nib does glide along very effortlessly. I still prefer my Bexley BX701s, but I'm not at all disappointed in the Staccato.


I don't want to hijack the thread, but I am trying to decide between a Staccato and a BX701, cappucino (both are available in this finish). How does the Bexley compare in size to the Staccato, and in smoothness? Are they both F nibs? If not, what nib? Thanks. You can PM me if you don't want to risk a hijack of the thread. Thanks.

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#33 jlepens

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 22:18

QUOTE(Stephen-I-am @ Mar 4 2008, 07:51 AM) View Post
Did you see the green and black ebonite Staccato at Swisher? Beautiful. I'd like this material in a smaller pen (M6xx size).

Stephen



I just got this one from Swisher. It is very nice, light weight but substantial.


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#34 Kakaze

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 01:29

I've finally gotten a chance to sit down and write something with my pen and I'm so disappointed. It was writing well for about quarter of a page and then it started putting down less and less ink until it died. I couldn't get it to start again until I opened it up and twisted the plunger down to force some ink into the feed. The same thing happened all over again, however, until I forced more ink into it. I decided to flush the whole thing out with warm soapy water. Right now I have it sitting apart to dry over night.

If it happens again after I put it back together what do I do?

#35 FrankB

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 14:56

Kakaze wrote:

" ... If it happens again after I put it back together what do I do?"

If it were me, I would try a different converter. It sounds as if the pen flows ink well as long as the converter is dispensing it. A different converter, or even a cartridge, might confirm that you do not have a problem with the pen itself.

#36 Deirdre

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 17:32

QUOTE(FrankB @ Mar 27 2008, 07:56 AM) View Post
If it were me, I would try a different converter.

I don't have anything useful to add, but I thought I'd stop for a moment and admire your correct usage of the subjunctive.
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#37 kiavonne

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 20:21

QUOTE(donwinn @ Mar 26 2008, 04:00 PM) View Post
QUOTE(kiavonne @ Mar 4 2008, 08:00 PM) View Post
I have two Staccatos, one in Honey Bee, and the other in Emerald Green (with red swirls, looks very Christmassy). I've inked the Honey Bee with Walnut. It writes extremely well. BIG pen but lightweight enough for me to use without posting and enjoy the experience. The nib does glide along very effortlessly. I still prefer my Bexley BX701s, but I'm not at all disappointed in the Staccato.


I don't want to hijack the thread, but I am trying to decide between a Staccato and a BX701, cappucino (both are available in this finish). How does the Bexley compare in size to the Staccato, and in smoothness? Are they both F nibs? If not, what nib? Thanks. You can PM me if you don't want to risk a hijack of the thread. Thanks.

Donnie



The Bexley is slightly smaller and lighter, though still a nice sized pen. The Staccato is by far the longest pen I own. I have the Cappuccino BX701. I love it. It is my daily journal writer. I also have the BX701 Blue Shimmer, which is the Staccato Starry Night. Again, I like it very much. I prefer the Bexley's because they fit my hands better. The Staccato is a bit heavier, and posted would rock me about I little, so I don't post it. I do post the Bexley. Both my models BX701 and Staccatos have medium nibs. They are very free flowing on both pens. I'd like to try fine nibs in them. I used to be a medium line lover, but since my collection of pens has grown, I've grown to like fine nibs better.

If I could get the finish I wanted in the BX701, that is where I would go. However, there were a couple of finishes in the Staccato that Bexley did not have that I really wanted. The style is sweet in both pens. I'd like to convince Bexley to add a few more finishes to the BX701.
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#38 Kakaze

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 00:41

QUOTE(FrankB @ Mar 27 2008, 10:56 AM) View Post
Kakaze wrote:

" ... If it happens again after I put it back together what do I do?"

If it were me, I would try a different converter. It sounds as if the pen flows ink well as long as the converter is dispensing it. A different converter, or even a cartridge, might confirm that you do not have a problem with the pen itself.



I sent an email to Todd at isellpens.com—where I bought it—and he replied back that he emailed Taccia and that they're going to send me a new nib. Unfortunately I don't have any cartridges or another converter to use, however, if the same thing happens after receiving the new nib I think I will pick up a new converter at the very least.

#39 John Cullen

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 00:55

donwinn---

Both are nice. I found that the medium on the Taccia was a little smoother and a little more tolerant of the angle at which it was held than was the medium on the Bexley. The Taccia nib was wetter and so a little more broad than the Bexley so that may be part of the experience. I prefer the Taccia but the comments above make a good point that the Taccia is a bit larger and heavier. Of course, these are my subjective observations. As I said, both are nice pens, IMO.

#40 Kakaze

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 08:17

The second nib exhibited the same behaviour as the first nib. Todd was kind enough to send me a new converter—this one with a small plastic ball inside. The same problem happened again with the new converter; each nib dried up completely.

When they get ink into them they write well but it seems that if just a little bit of air gets near the intake the ink just stops moving. I even tried dipping the end of a toothpick into dish soap and then sticking that into the converter...immediately the ink became more fluid inside the converter but it still doesn't flow through the nib well. I'm using Noodler's Ottoman Azure.

The only things left to try, that I can tell, are a bottle of a different colour and/or brand of ink, a cartridge—does anyone know a place that sells samplers? If I'm going to get cartridges it'd be nice not to have to buy a bunch of one colour—or some of the Tryphon InkSafe Additive that I've seen people talking about.

I don't want to keep bothering Todd because he doesn't have any control over any of this, nor do I want to send it to Taccia except as a last resort.

Any suggestions?




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