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Einstein's Pen


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#1 Jared

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 20:12

This photo is from 1940 showing Albert Einstein receiving his certificate of U.S. citizenship.

What pen would you guess is in his pocket? A Pelikan 100N?







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#2 ANM

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 21:05

I have a 100 N here beside me and have enlarged the picutre. To me it looks like Mr. Einstein's pen has a shorter dome and a thicker clip ring. The one that I see in Andreas Lambrou's Fountain Pens book, under the chapter on vintage German pens, it looks most like a Pelikan 100 C. As near as i can tell, the only other one that comes close is a Faber Castell 52 Wertfullhalter. Both of those pens are from 1936.
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#3 ebwatt

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 21:37

...or is he just happy to see the judge?

*cue rimshot*
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#4 captnemo

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 21:46

While we're on this topic, here is a photo of the pen Einstein used to write out his research on the Theory of Relativity. He gave it to his friend Paul Ehrenfest in 1921 when Ehrenfest became a professor at the University of Leiden.

http://www.museumboe...n/2002-okt.html

#5 Johnny Appleseed

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 22:42

QUOTE(captnemo @ Jan 30 2008, 01:46 PM) View Post
While we're on this topic, here is a photo of the pen Einstein used to write out his research on the Theory of Relativity. He gave it to his friend Paul Ehrenfest in 1921 when Ehrenfest became a professor at the University of Leiden.

http://www.museumboe...n/2002-okt.html


Ah - A Waterman Taper-cap, probably a 22 or 24. Cool!

I am always a little surprised at how common American pens were in Europe at that time.

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#6 captnemo

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 23:02

QUOTE(Johnny Appleseed @ Jan 30 2008, 05:42 PM) View Post
QUOTE(captnemo @ Jan 30 2008, 01:46 PM) View Post
While we're on this topic, here is a photo of the pen Einstein used to write out his research on the Theory of Relativity. He gave it to his friend Paul Ehrenfest in 1921 when Ehrenfest became a professor at the University of Leiden.

http://www.museumboe...n/2002-okt.html


Ah - A Waterman Taper-cap, probably a 22 or 24. Cool!

I am always a little surprised at how common American pens were in Europe at that time.

John


Yes, I think the U.S. was the technology leader in FPs back then.

It's funny, I ran across a blog the other day where the person stated that the FP was invented by the French. He or she had apparently learned that the FP was invented by Waterman, saw that Waterman is based in France, and jumped to the conclusion it was invented by the French. roflmho.gif

#7 Johnny Appleseed

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 23:16

QUOTE(captnemo @ Jan 30 2008, 03:02 PM) View Post
It's funny, I ran across a blog the other day where the person stated that the FP was invented by the French. He or she had apparently learned that the FP was invented by Waterman, saw that Waterman is based in France, and jumped to the conclusion it was invented by the French. roflmho.gif


Well, there are the Bion pens, named for Nicholas Bion of France, who first described them in 1709 - though he described them, but never claims to have invented one.

John

Edited by Johnny Appleseed, 31 January 2008 - 00:02.

So if you have a lot of ink,
You should get a Yink, I think.

- Dr Suess

Always looking for pens by Baird-North, Charles Ingersoll, and nibs marked "CHI"

#8 superfly

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 23:22

Looks like a Pelikan 140 to me, given the size. It looks rather small...

cheers,
Nenad

edit: oopps, I just find out I can zoom the photo. Well, from the shape of the blind cap, I say 100N...

Edited by superfly, 30 January 2008 - 23:23.

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#9 ANM

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 00:38

Pelikan 100
Einstein's pocket

Edited by ANM, 31 January 2008 - 01:08.

And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#10 ANM

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 01:09

Waterman taper-cap


And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

#11 FrankB

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 03:42

I am satisfied that Einstein is carrying a Pelikan. I really cannot judge the model, though.

#12 His Nibs

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 04:32

QUOTE(ANM @ Jan 30 2008, 07:38 PM) View Post
Pelikan 100
Einstein's pocket


I think it's clearly a Monteverde Cambria, from 2003. With relativistic time travel, this would not have been a problem for Albert.



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#13 jmkeuning

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 04:33

QUOTE(His Nibs @ Jan 30 2008, 10:32 PM) View Post
I think it's clearly a Monteverde Cambria, from 2003. With relativistic time travel, this would not have been a problem for Albert.


Wow. He actually did it!
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#14 cmeisenzahl

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 05:57

No guess at the model, but it certainly looks like a Pelikan to me.

#15 Ondina

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 08:23

QUOTE(Johnny Appleseed @ Jan 31 2008, 12:16 AM) View Post
QUOTE(captnemo @ Jan 30 2008, 03:02 PM) View Post
It's funny, I ran across a blog the other day where the person stated that the FP was invented by the French. He or she had apparently learned that the FP was invented by Waterman, saw that Waterman is based in France, and jumped to the conclusion it was invented by the French. roflmho.gif


Well, there are the Bion pens, named for Nicholas Bion of France, who first described them in 1709 - though he described them, but never claims to have invented one.

John



Thanks goodness some of us get the right perpective no matter the nationality....inventing and registering are two different things. Yes, the first FP described in detail was from this Frenchman, Bion, back 1702 although they are even earlier third party references, non documented, though by Spaniards and Italians. So Monsier Bion was the culprit.
On the other hand, no doubt US industrious companies made it affordable and mass produce, so we all can enjoy ours today.

The FP looks like a Pelikan to me, but go figure.

Edited by Ondina, 31 January 2008 - 08:28.


#16 Lloyd

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 13:46

I wonder if this was his everyday writer or his "special occasion" pocket jewelry (i.e. the MB of yesteryear).
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#17 Rapt

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 13:50

From what I have read of him I'd be surprised if he had "pocket jewelery" that wasn't also an everyday user.
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#18 Luca

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 19:10

Yes, it looks like a Pelikan of the 1920', which had Pelikan's own ink and MontBlank nib with an impressive range of tips.

http://www.pentrace....icle.asp?id=368

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#19 omasfan

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 06:11

I have nothing really to contribute to this thread. Just wanted to chime in and say that I absolutely love this topic! thumbup.gif Great post and enjoyable to boot! Being German, I feel ashamed that the political sea change in Germany forced a great researcher like Einstein not to return to his home. The Nazis were really effective in expelling Germany's greatest minds.
Good to see though, that he kept some German keepsakes (that is if this is really a Pelikan in his pocket which I don't really doubt).

Edited by omasfan, 01 February 2008 - 06:11.


#20 Noh

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 06:17

QUOTE(His Nibs @ Jan 30 2008, 09:32 PM) View Post
I think it's clearly a Monteverde Cambria, from 2003. With relativistic time travel, this would not have been a problem for Albert.



Actually it would still be a problem. Relativistic time travel only allows you to jump forward in time, not back.






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