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OMAS 361 FLEXIBLE\STIFF AXIAL NIB


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11 replies to this topic

#1 gicoteni

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 15:00


I like the OMAS 361 and its flexible\stiff nib. I have a very small collection of this model: a 361\S set FP + PNC in black celluloid body and gold filled cap, a 361\C black celluloid and gold filled cap and a black celluloid 361\T. They were produced in different years, but all about 1950's.


SET.jpg

The main feature of 361's nib is the difference of flexibility - not of the size like in Sheaffer Stylist or in Parker 180 – turning over the pen.

OP.jpg

3_PENS.jpg

P_361.jpg

180.jpg


Note in 180 difference of width and in 361 of stiffness

The nib is covered by an hood that on one side lets it quite open, so it can easily bend; on the opposite side the point only sticks out of the cover and it is very rigid. I have always seen a unique size of 361 nib, a fine\medium point, and always in gold.


NIB_1.jpg
NIB_2.jpg


The great flexibility makes it a wet nib too, while the stiff side is dry, so the difference of writing is evident.

EXAMPLE.jpg

The point is perfectly axial (just like in Stylist and 180) and when you rotate the pen you do not feel any change in the position of the nib.

AX.jpg

A_180_S.jpg

The hood also is free to rotate and one could rotate it to modify the flexibility of writing, but I prefer to turn the pen because the celluloid of the hood is thin and breakable (anyway in the instruction papers of 361 I do not find any reference to the rotation of the hood).
Unfortunately OMAS 361 is a pen not so easy to find and very rare in unused mint conditions.

Edited by gicoteni, 20 January 2008 - 15:15.


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#2 Celticshaman

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 19:53

Grazie for the photographs and descriptions Gicoteni.They are beautiful and so completely different from the Omas we know.
These older and more "european" models are tough to find,as you brought out.

Regards,

Jim

#3 georges zaslavsky

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 20:33

one very nice and interesting pen wink.gif grazie mille for sharing

Edited by georges zaslavsky, 26 January 2008 - 20:35.

Pens are like watches , once you start a collection, you can hardly go back. And pens like all fine luxury items do improve with time

#4 Sazerac

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 18:38

What an interesting and unique pen you describe here. Wonderful presentation too. Thanks for sharing it.

#5 rgarciasandoval

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 18:52

Hi all

I am not sure if this qualifies as a review, but for sure is a great graphic-essay about a quite remarkable vintage pen.

Just one question, is this celluloid from the fifties more like the regular celluloid or more like the cotton (vegetal) resin? Some of you guys knows how old the cotton resin is?

Thanks a lot gicoteni for sharing this

Very best

Ricardo

Edited by rgarciasandoval, 27 January 2008 - 18:52.


#6 gicoteni

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 22:17

QUOTE(rgarciasandoval @ Jan 27 2008, 07:52 PM) View Post
....
Just one question, is this celluloid from the fifties more like the regular celluloid or more like the cotton (vegetal) resin? Some of you guys knows how old the cotton resin is?
....


Hello. These pens are in black celluloid, so they do not have the chromatic effects typical of celluloid. Here in FPN I have found a topic regarding resin, plastic, celluloid...resin: it may help to understand the difference.
Ciao a tutti, Giuseppe

Edited by gicoteni, 27 January 2008 - 22:19.


#7 zanio

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 16:50

Hi all. I just read this topic and I wanted to share few pics...same matter.
It is about a vintage japanese pen by Platinum which has an interesting nib, very similar to the Parker 180 one.
Hope you like the pictures.

Cheers
Z


#8 CRB

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 21:07

Wow, what an interesting pen by Platinum. Thank you for sharing the pictures, Zanio; and thanks for bringing forward Giuseppe's excellent original thread.

Cheers,
Joe

#9 carlc

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 21:40

Wow, what an interesting pen by Platinum. Thank you for sharing the pictures, Zanio; and thanks for bringing forward Giuseppe's excellent original thread.

Cheers,
Joe


Hi Joe - wow it's weird to find you here rather than the Waterman forum!

Gicoteni - thank you an excellent and informative post.

Carl
"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch" Orson Welles


#10 youstruckgold

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Posted 29 May 2010 - 10:32

I have the 361T and love it! I use the flex side for writing and signatures - lovely flex, and the rigid side for docs that need stiffer nibs for carbon or similar.
The rung of a ladder was never meant to rest upon, but only to hold a man's foot long enough to enable him to put the other somewhat higher - Thomas Huxley
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#11 markiv

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 23:00

Great thread and great instruments; thank you.

Posting here so I can find it easily in the future.

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#12 iroshizuku

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 20:47

Thanks for sharing! What a beautiful pen!






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