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Platinum 3776 Black Ribbed Model


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16 replies to this topic

#1 Martius

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 00:48

Hi folks,

This is my first review. I stumbled on Platinum pens via Nakaya, whose artisans are all retired Platinum old-timers. Since I have fallen violently in love with Nakaya pens (the look of them, that is, since I haven't had the chance to try one), I wanted to find a somewhat cheaper way to get a feel for what I might expect from Nakaya, since this college student's money can't go into all the great pens he might want (ugggh). Thus my trolling eBay for a Platinum. Since the ribbed 3776 comes recommended from Nakaya, I decided I would seek out one of those, and so I have. Enjoy the review - I hope it helps anyone curious about these fantastic pens.






First Impressions: 3/5

Having arrived in good time, this pen, as I imagine a lot of them do around here, got torn out of the box a bit violently. I was surprised to see how cheap and plasticky the pen's box looked, even compared to a Targa box or a Pelikan box. This impression did not abate when I opened the box - then pen itself, while shiny, definitely sports a strange design, with a second set of gold bands around the midsection. Included were the converter and two catridges of Platinum Blue (this pen, as do all Platinum pens as well as Nakaya pens, take Platinum cartridges and converters only - unless you order a special modifier available through Nakaya). The most upsetting thing about this pen was the looseness of the cap: it is snap-style and it had come part way off during shipping. The nib was fine, but jeez! Nevertheless, there seems to be nothing unsound about the cap mechanism, so I suppose all pens of this model have the same cap design.

Overall, not a positive start.

Appearance and Finish: 4/5

An attractive black pen. This pen is available in burgundy for those of you who have too many black pens (I wanted a burgundy one myself, but I couldn't find one for a decent price). Aside from the somewhat odd gold band just above the middle of the pen, this pen has an overall design that is harmonious and that looks very good posted. The ribs make the design all the more interesting.

Design/Size/Weight: 5/5

This pen weighs in strong when it comes to feel. The size capped is about 5.5 inches, but uncapped, the pen is exactly as long as a standard Parker "51". Thus the size is easily manageable for most hand sizes: if you have small hands, the balance is pretty good unposted; but if you can post this pen comfortably (and the design encourages posting - the end is unribbed in order to accommodate the cap), the balance is very good indeed. If you use the pen unposted, it is extremely light, which might not be preferable to some people. However, the cap is relatively heavy, and it balances out the pen nicely when posted.





The material of this pen is resin that is resilient to wear and has a great glossy finish. The gold plating of the furniture seems sound. The pen felt light and plasticky to me - definitely lacking the heft of an Omas piston filler. But the balance is very good, indicating high quality of manufacture.

Nib Desing and Performance: 10/5

This is where this pen excels almost every other pen I own. All the dubious impressions I got when I first saw this pen fell away after I inserted a cartridge of Platinum Blue-Black, squeezed, and was able to write with the pen on the first stroke. The nib is made of 14k gold and has a Japanese F point. It is definitely the best F nib I own - it is smoother than my European and American F's even though it is finer. The ink flow is good but not too wet, comparable to the flow on '50's Sheaffer Triumph nibs (if you are familiar with those). Maybe a 5 out of 10 on an arbitrary scale of wetness.

The feeling this nib imparts is wonderful and workmanlike. The tines themselves don't spread apart much even under a good deal of pressure. However, the whole nib does flex upward in the manner of a flex nib, so there is definitely a springy feeling to the nib, something I've never seen done quite like this before. I assume it is a specific aid in writing Chinese and Kanji characters, a compromise for both softness and a consistency of line width that that style of writing values.

This pen has yet to skip or break a line. The flow is excellent at all times. The agitator in the Platinum catridge, while making a disconcerting clacking noise, is apparently effective.

I don't have a Sailor F to compare this pen with (my Sailor F-nibbed 1911 is on its way now), but I suspect this pen has a bit more feedback than the Sailor - but this is definitely designed feedback; it is just the slightest bit toothy in all directions. But don't take this the wrong way. This is a SMOOTH nib with a touch of tooth for flavor, not the other way around. And I am one who likes a smooth nib, so this nib might be just perfect for someone who enjoys slight feedback.

If only my European moderns came with such writing quality and reliability right out of the box! (I've had to send a Pelikan in for a nib exchange just in the past week.)






As you can see, the sample from the Platinum is a tad thinner than the Parker "51" and the Densho. Part of the reason why it is finer, however, is because of the lighter flow the Platinum is set up with.

Filling System: 5/5 (!)

Usually I don't like cartridge/converter filling systems because they can display inconsistent flow. However, I have had no such problems with the one Platinum cartridge I am using, and I will get word out on the converter when I try it. I assume the wide mouth of both cartridge and converter are responsible for such good flow.

The cartridges are nice and big, but the converter seems to hold about as much ink as your standard international sized converter, which is sort of a letdown considering the size of the cartridges. At least the converter mechanism seems reliable.

Cost/Value: 5/5

I paid $140 shipped for this pen on eBay. This may be a bit higher than one can get them for in an open auction, but to me this pen is worth it. The design and quality is worth the money.

Conclusion: 5/5

This is truly a workhorse of a pen, which should last me the 10 years of Platinum's own forecast and well beyond. While first impressions of this pen might mark it as being somewhat of a lightweight (both literally and figuratively), don't judge this pen until you write with it. It is truly a magnificent writer that has seemingly conquered the flow problems associated with a lot of cartridge-converter pens. The cap is my biggest concern about this pen - I would recommend that you get a model with a threaded cap, ribs or no ribs. However, I have had no problems with the cap coming off, so this might not be something to worry about.

Overall a pen that is well worth the cost straight out of the box. I will definitely start saving up so I can enter the custom care of the Nakaya artisans!

Best,
Summer

"Can I see Arcturus from where I stand?" -RPW

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#2 greencobra

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 01:25

I think the ribs make this a most curious design, I like the look. Thanks for the review of a most interesting pen.
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#3 trencherman

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 16:48

This Platinum perfect pen is one of my favourite writers. Since I acquire fountain pens first and foremost for their writing quality, I am surprised that this pen does not seem to have attracted as much interest as its upmarket sibling specially considering that the shape and the configuration of its nib assembly is exactly the same as the basic Nakaya nib down to its double Fuji engraving.





#4 jonro

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 21:56

Thanks! I've been interested in these pens, mainly because of the ribbed design. What is the width of the barrel compared to the Parker 51?

#5 Martius

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Posted 06 December 2007 - 08:27

QUOTE(jonro @ Dec 4 2007, 04:56 PM) View Post
Thanks! I've been interested in these pens, mainly because of the ribbed design. What is the width of the barrel compared to the Parker 51?



Overall I would say it feels a tad thicker than the 51, but I hold the 51 pretty close to the nib, so I would say the thickness of the 51's section just below the clutch ring about equals the 3776's section feel-wise.

Best,
Summer
"Can I see Arcturus from where I stand?" -RPW

#6 Vicary

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Posted 06 December 2007 - 17:54

I'm an authorized Platinum dealer, and I picked one of these up at the New York Pen Show for the shop, but ended up keeping it for myself. I've been using it pretty steadily ever since. I got the burgundy version, and chose a broad nib. Dick Egolf, the Platinum distributor in the US, says he uses one as his daily writer and really preferred the broad nibs. I took his advice and I have to say, with the broad nib it is one of the smoothest, most consistently good writers I have. Nice wet line, not too broad, and the Platinum cartridges are great because they have a little ball bearing in them which keeps the ink flowing. The pen doesn't look too bad, wither. Sort of a modern day Watermans 100 Year design.

best,
Doug


#7 Gepzo

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 06:32

Little bit of trivia for those who have access to one, or access to a good picture of one... the number of ribs in relation to the gold bands...

on the cap are three ribs, then a gold band.

On the pen barrel there are 14, then a band, and then 6 more ribs.

Get it yet?
3-14-6

3 - 7 + 7 - 6!

3776!

The height of Mt. Fuji, which is "perfect", like this pen.

Mine came with a converter, a little adapter so it could take the standard international cartridge (although I hear they are hard to remove once installed), and one cart of platinum black ink.

I do have some curiosity, though, as on the Nakaya site, they refer to the pen as being extensively tested by writers, and on the Platinum catalog, they call it the writer's model, but once it gets to the USA, it gets called the samurai. I don't really know why they felt the need to change the name, or maybe it is just the seller trying to market it to westerners. I like the idea of a field-tested pen developed with input from writers being combined with a tribute to a Japanese landmark and artistic tradition, than of a gimmick like "a samurai armor-inspired pen!"



#8 Lloyd

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 13:58

I have one of these with a medium nib and have to agree on the quality of the nib. Mine is a marvelously smooth Asian medium rightside-up and a nearly as smooth Asian fine upside-down. Flow is perfect with Noodler's RedBlack. The click-cap is great for quick access. The only flaw is that mine can't be parked capped and nib-up for >24 hours without a hard start-up. However, if left horizontal for weeks, it'll start right up. This is a surprisingly great writer - easily one of my favorites.
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#9 FrankB

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 16:00

Since this review was initially written, I have obtained a ribbed 3776 myself. I have to join the others in lauding the pen.

My ribbed example is larger than my standard 3776, both in length and girth. That extra size makes it more comfortable for me to hold than the standard. The ribbed pen's nib is a little narrower than the standard, but as long and it writes every bit as well. I have a BB nib on my ribbed example that writes nearly like a wet Western M stub, and it is delightful.

#10 encremental

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 17:48

Platinum pens are completely unavailable in the UK, except for this model and a plainer one with music nib which can be got from Cyberpens for £100. It took three months to reach me (let's not talk about that), but was well worth the wait.

I like the odd design, but you would not dream that this was an expensive pen until you write with it. A Prera has more heft. But when you take that cap off - sheerest heaven....... All the virtues of a Sailor nib, but without that glassy smoothness which I find (undeniably) impressive and yet somehow reminiscent of Parker gels, all over the place unless your writing has more discipline than mine.

This nib has just that hint of feedback combined with smoothness that is perfection. My pen came with a tiny adaptor that allows it to use international cartridges. As the converter hardly holds enough ink for a day's writing, I was very pleased to discover that cartridges work extremely well in it; lovely wet flow and no skipping. At last, a pen worthy of that stream of Diamine free carts that seem to be building up as I explore the range in those tempting new 30ml bottles!

I wish Platinum were more widely available here - I would be buying every 3776 variant like I seem to be doing with Pelikans.

John

#11 Martius

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 04:39

QUOTE(encremental @ May 22 2008, 01:48 PM) View Post
Platinum pens are completely unavailable in the UK, except for this model and a plainer one with music nib which can be got from Cyberpens for £100. It took three months to reach me (let's not talk about that), but was well worth the wait.

I like the odd design, but you would not dream that this was an expensive pen until you write with it. A Prera has more heft. But when you take that cap off - sheerest heaven....... All the virtues of a Sailor nib, but without that glassy smoothness which I find (undeniably) impressive and yet somehow reminiscent of Parker gels, all over the place unless your writing has more discipline than mine.

This nib has just that hint of feedback combined with smoothness that is perfection. My pen came with a tiny adaptor that allows it to use international cartridges. As the converter hardly holds enough ink for a day's writing, I was very pleased to discover that cartridges work extremely well in it; lovely wet flow and no skipping. At last, a pen worthy of that stream of Diamine free carts that seem to be building up as I explore the range in those tempting new 30ml bottles!

I wish Platinum were more widely available here - I would be buying every 3776 variant like I seem to be doing with Pelikans.

John


Yessir, Platinums really are exceptional pens. I think they are every bit the equal if Sailor nib-wise - I even like them better because they are a bit softer. The bodies may seem cheaper, but they are perfectly functional. Nothing wrong with Platinum cartridges or BB ink, either. On the whole, I think they should be more widely appreciated in the West.

Best,
Summer
"Can I see Arcturus from where I stand?" -RPW

#12 kosta

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 01:53

I received one of these several weeks ago from Fountain Pen Hospital. Black, F nib.

It's the finest nib I own, a bit finer than the Pilot Custom 74 F. I had some skipping with Noodler's Black ink, and hard starting, (even after laying it horizontally overnight rather than upright). Lately I switched to Noodler's Eternal Blue, and that is working just fine.

There is a slight rattle. Not from the cartridge, in my case, but from the converter: specifically, the knob on the end of the converter. It seems to work fine, nonetheless.

I had had thoughts of making this pen into an eyedropper. That now appears to be a very bad idea: the gold band around the middle of the barrel is partly inside the barrel, so there would be corrosion issues as well as another seam which might leak. Also, the portion of the section which is inside the barrel, (where the converter attaches), appears to be entirely made of metal --- right up to and including the threads where the barrel attaches.

In conclusion: a nice pen. I like my Pilot Custom 74 F a little better, and that costs half as much, but I find the Platinum's slip cap more convenient than the Pilot's screw cap.



#13 wolf4

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 15:28

Appearance and Finish: 4/5

An attractive black pen. This pen is available in burgundy for those of you who have too many black pens (I wanted a burgundy one myself, but I couldn't find one for a decent price). Aside from the somewhat odd gold band just above the middle of the pen, this pen has an overall design that is harmonious and that looks very good posted. The ribs make the design all the more interesting.

Design/Size/Weight: 5/5

This pen weighs in strong when it comes to feel. The size capped is about 5.5 inches, but uncapped, the pen is exactly as long as a standard Parker "51". Thus the size is easily manageable for most hand sizes: if you have small hands, the balance is pretty good unposted; but if you can post this pen comfortably (and the design encourages posting - the end is unribbed in order to accommodate the cap), the balance is very good indeed. If you use the pen unposted, it is extremely light, which might not be preferable to some people. However, the cap is relatively heavy, and it balances out the pen nicely when posted.

<img src="http://photos-591.ll...350194_689.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

<img src="http://photos-591.ll...350195_949.jpg" border="0" class="linked-image" />

The material of this pen is resin that is resilient to wear and has a great glossy finish. The gold plating of the furniture seems sound. The pen felt light and plasticky to me - definitely lacking the heft of an Omas piston filler. But the balance is very good, indicating high quality of manufacture.

Nib Desing and Performance: 10/5

This is where this pen excels almost every other pen I own. All the dubious impressions I got when I first saw this pen fell away after I inserted a cartridge of Platinum Blue-Black, squeezed, and was able to write with the pen on the first stroke. The nib is made of 14k gold and has a Japanese F point. It is definitely the best F nib I own - it is smoother than my European and American F's even though it is finer. The ink flow is good but not too wet, comparable to the flow on '50's Sheaffer Triumph nibs (if you are familiar with those). Maybe a 5 out of 10 on an arbitrary scale of wetness.

The feeling this nib imparts is wonderful and workmanlike. The tines themselves don't spread apart much even under a good deal of pressure. However, the whole nib does flex upward in the manner of a flex nib, so there is definitely a springy feeling to the nib, something I've never seen done quite like this before. I assume it is a specific aid in writing Chinese and Kanji characters, a compromise for both softness and a consistency of line width that that style of writing values.

This pen has yet to skip or break a line. The flow is excellent at all times. The agitator in the Platinum catridge, while making a disconcerting clacking noise, is apparently effective.

I don't have a Sailor F to compare this pen with (my Sailor F-nibbed 1911 is on its way now), but I suspect this pen has a bit more feedback than the Sailor - but this is definitely designed feedback; it is just the slightest bit toothy in all directions. But don't take this the wrong way. This is a SMOOTH nib with a touch of tooth for flavor, not the other way around. And I am one who likes a smooth nib, so this nib might be just perfect for someone who enjoys slight feedback.


Hi "Martius" Yes I know I'm a little late in replying to your well written review - about two years late!

I came across your review accidently because I too started to take an interest on Platinum pens and so I did a search on those who wrote about the Platinum at FPN.

I have two Sailor 1911 Classic pens one with the F nib and the other an M nib. I also purchased the cheap Pilot Prera pen M nib. When I received the Prera I actually liked the robust feel of the nib and that the M nib wrote a pretty good F line like that of the Sailor 1911 F nib!

The F nib on the Sailor feels "dainty" compared to the Pilot Prera with M nib that writes a good F line and the Prera feels robust and solid, I like that. In other words the solid feel of the Pilot Prera can take more punishment than some of these expensive pens - I don't mean dropping it to the ground, but if I accidently knocked it agaiins a coffe cup etc.

Sorry...where am I trying to go with all this?

I suppose I am really trying to find a pen nib that is ROBUST like some of these cheap pens like the Piolt Prera or the Lamys, that doesn't feel "dainty" and is going to have a nib that writes a good fine smooth line.

Sorry, I am still "waffling"! Bottom line, does the nib of the Platinum feel quite solid and robust? Do you know any pen that does? Please don't mention Lamy, I do not like them because their EF nibs write like B nibs! Okay...wir haben keine Zeit mehr! LOL. Ich bin in Österreich fur ein Jahr gewesen. Aber jetzt habe ich mein Deutsch vergessen. Sorry, I was showing off! B) LOL noticed your "German" bit in your Profile.

Anyway, not sure if you will notice this post but...just thought I'd try. :)

Edited by wolf4, 05 April 2010 - 17:03.


#14 donwinn

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 23:22

I have a ribbed 3776, and it does not feel as robust as my 21K 1911 full size Sailor. My Sailor feels more robust than my Pilot Knight, but I have no experience with the 1911M, so I cannot speak for that one. The Sailor F is incrementally smoother than the Platinum, but similarly fine line.

Donnie

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#15 wolf4

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 01:00

I have a ribbed 3776, and it does not feel as robust as my 21K 1911 full size Sailor. My Sailor feels more robust than my Pilot Knight, but I have no experience with the 1911M, so I cannot speak for that one. The Sailor F is incrementally smoother than the Platinum, but similarly fine line.

Donnie

Hi "donwin". We meet again! :D Are you following me? I see you answering my other post aswell! :lol:

Thanks for giving me some feedback.

By the way, I just want to clarify that I'm talking about the robustness of the nibs, not the whole pen as a whole, like the body and cap. Just want to make sure you know what I meant.

I don't know if you ever had a Lamy pen or a Pilot Prera "donwin" but it's just that with these pens and the nibs they use, you cannot help but get the impression that they can take a little more punishment than most expensive pens. It's a general feeling really. I mean, isn't that perhaps what Lamy is all about?

I don't like Lamy anymore because an EF nib is more like a B nib to me!

Both my Sailors 1911 are the full size classic. They are wonderful pens, I do like them. But sometimes when I pick up the Prera pen it feels like I can throw it around! Well...not literally...but you know what I mean...I think. :)

#16 donwinn

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 01:24

I have a ribbed 3776, and it does not feel as robust as my 21K 1911 full size Sailor. My Sailor feels more robust than my Pilot Knight, but I have no experience with the 1911M, so I cannot speak for that one. The Sailor F is incrementally smoother than the Platinum, but similarly fine line.

Donnie

Hi "donwin". We meet again! :D Are you following me? I see you answering my other post aswell! :lol:

Thanks for giving me some feedback.

By the way, I just want to clarify that I'm talking about the robustness of the nibs, not the whole pen as a whole, like the body and cap. Just want to make sure you know what I meant.

I don't know if you ever had a Lamy pen or a Pilot Prera "donwin" but it's just that with these pens and the nibs they use, you cannot help but get the impression that they can take a little more punishment than most expensive pens. It's a general feeling really. I mean, isn't that perhaps what Lamy is all about?

I don't like Lamy anymore because an EF nib is more like a B nib to me!

Both my Sailors 1911 are the full size classic. They are wonderful pens, I do like them. But sometimes when I pick up the Prera pen it feels like I can throw it around! Well...not literally...but you know what I mean...I think. :)


I don't have a Prera, but I have two Knights, and several 78Gs, all of which use the same nib, except for color. By its nature, a steel nib can take more punishment than a 21K gold nib. That being said, the nib on my 1911 feels more substantial, as does the pen, compared to my Pilot Knight. The 78G is significantly smaller, lighter, and less robust overall than the 1911. Not a criticism, as I have several of the 78Gs, and saying a Kia Rio is less substantial than a Lexus is not a slam on the Kia; merely an observation.

The 1911 has no spring at all to the nib, and the Knight/78G has a similar amount. I am by nature more careful with the 1911, as I am with my 46 Vacumatic, as I treasure them more than my Knight/78G class pens. If you are looking for a more substantial pen, with a nib which could probably be classed as a weapon, you might look at the Rotring 600. It has a gold nib, and looks like, and feels like, a weapon.

Donnie

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.
Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)
 


#17 Federmann

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 20:32

Where are the pictures gone?
Can't see them.

Edited by Federmann, 11 July 2010 - 20:33.







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