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Parker 51 -- correct feed+collector assembly ?


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#1 iStealth

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 21:35

Hi All,

Today I got my second Parker 51 and it's a cute Demi. The pen is a combination of parts as I understood - on the barrel "made in Canada", on the cap "made in USA" and on the nib - "made in England 1952". Is it possible that at least a nib can be from another country than the rest of the parts (in a original pen)? The nib is broad which does not suit to such a small pen, and the pen has no rubber O-ring (between the hood and metal ring).

I disassembled it (as I did with my first one) and again the breather tube was broken, so I fixed it, but the question about the feed and collector appeared again. I read on the web that

"The collector has a thin slit running almost its entire length, and a broader air channel running along the opposite side of the finned area. Insert the assembled feed and breather tube, and then the nib, into the collector with the top surface of the feed and nib lined up as exactly as possible with the broad air channel. This is the way the original “51” design documents specified assembly. A later Parker service manual stated that aligning the nib and feed with the air channel isn't necessary, but my experience indicates that the pen will flow more reliably with these parts aligned."

When I opened the Demi (and I'm not sure about my first 51) the position was not as described (or I haven't got the description above right). I attached the picture how it was, the question is if it's correct or it should be rotated 180 degrees?.

The second picture shows the strange black thing in the collector (small plastic rod) that pushes collector apart a bit, probably it controls the ink flow (probably especially for that broad nib). The question would be - what is the exact job of that black thing? how can I test it and how can I adjust the ink flow in general?

Thanks in advance.



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#2 psfred

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 23:14

The bit of hard rubber is there to keep the slip open when you push the collector into the "section". Don't dislodge it, or you will have ink flow problems.

The collector is exactly upsidedown from where I put them. The ink slit should line up with the bottom center of the feed and nib, with the air channel on top, lined up with the slit in the nib.

Quite a few of the dozen or so I've taken apart (and my similar Chinese pens) have the slits any which way in relation to the feed and nib, and they all wrote better once I had them assembled correctly. It may not really make any difference, but i do like the air channel on top, makes more sense that way.

Peter

#3 iStealth

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 16:21

QUOTE(psfred @ Nov 21 2007, 12:14 AM) View Post
The collector is exactly upsidedown from where I put them. The ink slit should line up with the bottom center of the feed and nib, with the air channel on top, lined up with the slit in the nib.

Peter

Thanks. My two other P51 have that black rubber, but one does not. The write almost the same, but I might try to fix it if I find the appropriate material.

#4 psfred

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 21:23

Later "51"s have a melted spot in the plastic that does the same thing. Make sure the slit does not close of you apply pressure to the collector as if it were being inserted into the holder. If it stays open, it's fine. If not, you need to put a bit of photographic film or something similar in there to keep it open, else the pen is likely to write dry.

Peter

#5 wdyasq

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 02:56

I agree with the lat two replies.

Ron
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#6 iStealth

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 13:31

QUOTE(psfred @ Nov 25 2007, 10:23 PM) View Post
... else the pen is likely to write dry.

Peter

Thanks. The pen is from 1953, and the collector does not have that small pushing-apart-plastic. But the pen in fact writes quite wet. I tried to heat the feed and nib and now they are closely together, and also tines are tight.. So I have no idea how to make the pen write dry. I also posted here if the ink type/brand can solve the problem (probably higher viscosity). Now I'm using standard Quink.

Thanks.

#7 Brian C

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 16:09

I have to revive this thread to ask about the small piece of rubber that holds the collector slit open. I have never seen this referenced before. I am assuming you can't just buy the piece needed. What does everyone use in it's place?



#8 FarmBoy

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 16:55

I have to revive this thread to ask about the small piece of rubber that holds the collector slit open. I have never seen this referenced before. I am assuming you can't just buy the piece needed. What does everyone use in it's place?

On the first few versions (yes the collecgtor went through a series of revisions) of the collector, Parker used the small rubber rod to ensure the channel didn't close.  Later versions this was accomplished by a thermal weld.

 

If you lack a source for the small rubber rods you could use a properly sized stainless rod or a short piece of graphite core from a mechanical pencil will work.


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#9 TimGirdler

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 22:31

FarmBoy is right:  A piece of pencil lead will work.

 

Here, however, is the rub:  The hard rubber plugs I've measured are 0.64mm.  That means a 0.5mm lead is too small and a 0.7mm lead is too big.

 

Here's where this gets tricky...  Some collectors that require the hard rubber plugs fit too loosely in the barrel.  So, a wider plug would be desirable.  By the same token, some fit too tightly, and a narrower plug would make an easier fit.

 

So, here's what I do:

 

1.  Put a 0.7mm pencil lead into the hard rubber shaft in the collector and break the lead to fit the collector.

 

2.  Test the collector to see if the collector will fit in the barrel with the new, wider plug.  (DON'T FORCE IT; it will almost certainly be too tight.  I've only ever had one collector that I've left at 0.7mm)

 

3.  Remove the new plug and roll it back and forth on a 1-inch square piece of 2,000-grit wet/dry auto sand paper.  Just use your finger to roll the lead--it'll take off plenty of material.

 

4.  Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the collector fits properly.

 

I've found this to be the best way to do things.  Others might have different suggestions that might work just as well, though anything metal is probably not the best for sizing reasons.

 

Blessings,

 

Tim


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