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Buying Lamy 2000 what size nib (first FP)


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#1 Teuton

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 07:07

Hey folks,

I've decided on the 2000 for my first FP but I'm not sure what size nib I want. This pen will be used for writing - writing notes, school, and general stuff.

Also, i'm buying it through Oscarbraun, is this a reliable seller?

thanks.

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#2 blak000

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 07:17

Yes, Pam Braun has quite a good reputation among members on this forum. I haven't bought from her yet myself, but people have only the best things to say about her. You should feel completely comfortable buying from her.

As for the 2000... it's a little hard to say, unless you know what nib size you're generally comfortable with. If you like to write small, then go with the Extra Fine. If you write a more "medium" size.. then go Fine.

Lamy 2000 nibs run one size larger than other pens, usually, and a Medium size will write closer to a Broad from another pen. I have the Fine size, myself, and I find it to be a great size for writing notes. The smaller sized nib you get, the more tooth you might feel... the Fine in the 2000 is a good middle point, in my opinion.
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#3 Russ

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 11:42

I have a 2000 in XF. The vertical strokes are a bit thinner than the horizontal strokes. The nib writes crisply; very businesslike. However, I have found that when reading pages of notes made with this XF on quality paper, the thin verticals are hard on the eyes. It seems that as the eye moves across the page from left to right, thick verticals & thin horizontals stand out better than thin verticals and thick horizontals. This would agree with the preference many have for italic nibs, which produce thicker verticals.

#4 Teuton

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 21:25

ok, thanks for the replies so far.

Can anybody else offer insight to my problem? I would like to order the pen tonight but don't know what nib size to get as a beginner.

Like i said, this will be an all around writer.

#5 Russ

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 22:19

If your writing is large and loopy, go with the fine.
If it is small, go with the extra-fine.

#6 Garageboy

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 22:25

Fine is like a 0.7mm rollerball, IIRC (someone correct me if I'm off)
If you write on crappier papers, fine is a happy medium. wide enough not to drag in, but not too wide as to feather a lot

#7 Shelley

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 22:38

the seller is excellant, ask Pam to choose you a good one and she will (did for me anyway-and it was perfect out of the box).
I went for an EF because I started out writing small, but I am slowly getting bigger nibs, so if I was buying now I might go for a F. They do write larger than most nibs, but you can turn them over and write with the otherside for a size smaller. For everday writing I would probably go for an F, and flip upside down for margins...
Lamy 2000-Lamy Vista-Visconti Van Gogh Maxi Tortoise Demonstrator-Pilot Vanishing Point Black Carbonesque-1947 Parker 51 Vacumatic Cedar Blue Double Jewel-Aurora Optima Black Chrome Cursive Italic-Waterman Hemisphere Metallic Blue-Sheaffer Targa-Conway Stewart CS475

#8 roboPen

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 23:23

QUOTE(Teuton @ Nov 6 2007, 01:25 PM)  
ok, thanks for the replies so far.

Can anybody else offer insight to my problem? I would like to order the pen tonight but don't know what nib size to get as a beginner.

Like i said, this will be an all around writer.


When you buy rollerball pens, do you go for the thinnest possible pen, don't care, or the thickest?

If you look for the thinnest rollerballs, you will probably want an XF nib on your Lamy 2000. Otherwise, you might like a Fine or Medium nib.

If you don't like what you buy, you can send the pen to Lamy for a nib replacement.

See my comparison for a writing sample. The L2K nib is XF.



#9 waynephillips

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 23:39

My Lamy 2000 just arrived today. I got the XF nib. It's not as fine/thin as I would have thought. Then again, people on this forum have said the Lamy nibs tend to be sized a little large than others.
My Lamy 2000 XF NIB is pretty much the same thickness as my new pelikan 605 Fine nib pen. The LAMY 2000 is comparable to the pilot v5 rollerball I use at work.

Current Fountain Pens:
Pelikan M605 - 2007
Lamy 2000 - 2007
Montblanc Meisterstuck Chopin - 2007
Montblanc Meisterstuck Mozart - 2007
Parker 51 (1950s) - 2007
Cross Townsend 10K - 2007
Lamy Studio - 2007

#10 Apollo

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 02:00

QUOTE(waynephillips @ Nov 6 2007, 06:39 PM)  
People on this forum have said the Lamy nibs tend to be sized a little large than others.


Very true. The first Lamy 2000 I ever bought had a medium nib and while it was a great smooth wet writer, it was just a little bit broad for what I wanted to use it for so I eventually got one with a fine nib. Nib sizes can sometimes vary even with pens by the same manufacturer (such as Parker) so unless you're lucky enough to have a specialty pen shop in your area where you can examine pens before you buy them, it pays to do a bit of research. If you find that Lamy's medium nib writes too thick for your tastes, then I recommend the following: When buying a Japanese fountain pen, go with a medium, but if you buy a European or American pen, get a fine.
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#11 kimpearsonusa

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 23:46

It sounds like the above posts may have answered my question for me.

 

My next FP will be a Lamy Studio.  I have a few Mont Blanc's with Fine and one MED. I use the MED almost as a marker as my handwriting is too sloppy for a medium I guess.  Love the MB fine nibs.  I also have a Waterman with a fine that I love.

 

My last purchase was my first Visconti Rembrandt which only came as Med and FINE.  The Fine is much too thick for me   :(

 

Sounds like I should go with the EF for a Lamy, would you agree?

 

Thanks!


Edited by kimpearsonusa, 13 November 2017 - 23:48.







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