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Discontinued Visconti 23K Pd Nib

visconti palladium broad

12 replies to this topic

#1 silverlifter

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 03:07

So I recently acquired1 a Homo Sapiens Maxi with the two-tone 23k Pd nib. The nib is a broad and, typically for a palladium, writes wet and really broad.

 

I'm not really a broadside dweller, so I am now faced with a quandary. Do I keep the pen and have someone grind it down to a medium cursive italic, or do I not vandalise a beautiful broad, now discontinued, nib and pass it on to someone who would actuall enjoy it?

 

I'm also conscious that having a narrower grind on a nib clearly stamped 'B' would probably trigger my OCD every time I uncapped the pen, so there is that...

 

What are your thoughts? Respect the nib, or grind away?

 

23kPd.jpg

 

1. I won this unexpectedly in an auction, and am still sort of surprised I now own it: so it feels like a windfall...


Edited by silverlifter, 03 September 2020 - 03:08.

Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


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#2 A Smug Dill

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 05:29

What are your thoughts? Respect the nib, or grind away?

 

The nib isn't an artefact of historical, cultural or religious significance. It's your personal property, for which you have paid and to which you have clear title; so it's proper either way you choose, as long as it pleases you to do what you will with it.

 

You aren't wilfully and unreasonably denying someone something (that they 'deserve'), any more than you would be denying them first place if you were fairly in competition against them and beat them to the prize.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.


#3 silverlifter

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 06:49

You aren't wilfully and unreasonably denying someone something (that they 'deserve'), any more than you would be denying them first place if you were fairly in competition against them and beat them to the prize.

 

No, but if the nib in its original condition could potentially bring someone else more of a sense of happiness or fulfillment or whatever positive emotional state people attach to pens, then given the now scarcity of this nib, I am inclined to feel some obligation--which I do not expect others to share--to consider whether my enjoyment outweighs the loss to others1.

 

The thread really was an attempt to explore the extent to which that sentiment is shared amongst pen afficionados, and if it is sufficiently widespread that it so validates my own feelings, then I would be more inclined to pay it heed.

 

1. And as a vintage fan, I am aware that said loss extends into the future, at least as I percieve it.


Edited by silverlifter, 03 September 2020 - 06:50.

Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#4 A Smug Dill

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 07:30

Fair enough. My personal view is that if (a finite) N units of something is/was produced, it ought not be read that N units would remain in existence and/or circulation "in the community" for some time to come; the acquisition of each unit by someone — including but not limited to users, private collectors, research labs, and museums operating as public facilities which nevertheless do not allow visitors to borrow or utilise the exhibits — rightly takes it out of circulation, irrespective of whether the total value those N units could conceivably deliver is "artificially" diminished as a result. This extends even to the nibs crafted by the late Mr Nagahara Sr., whom I personally revere, who created Sailor's whole line of Naginata nibs; Sailor could keep producing those well into the future, but the products themselves arguably won't be the same, yet it doesn't mean (to me) that there is a valid argument, that incumbent possessors of such a limited amount of "treasure" that can never be produced again, ought to look at how much they personally appreciate and/or value the objects and relinquish ownership, in the name of sharing or preservation if some other entity will appreciate the artefacts more keenly.

 

I believe we are consumers of what was commercially sold and bought, not mere custodians of artefacts in this life. How many pieces of Ming dynasty china (which arguable could still be used and enjoyed for their original purposes), Meiji-era weaponry used by the samurai (which, if sharpened, could still cut today), and slide rules from the early 20th Century (which could still operate today) in the Western world have been lost, or broken, or ended up in landfill? Does it really matter?


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.


#5 silverlifter

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 07:50

Does it really matter?


Well, it does to me. :)

I'd be much happier if there were more Sheaffer Premiers around and the prices reflected that supply!

I'm just curious if there are now, or will be in generations to come, pen people who will regard this nib and pen in that same light.

Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#6 The Blue Knight

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 11:33

Well, it does to me. :)

I'd be much happier if there were more Sheaffer Premiers around and the prices reflected that supply!

I'm just curious if there are now, or will be in generations to come, pen people who will regard this nib and pen in that same light.

 

 

If you tend to flip your pens I wouldn't get a grind. As depending on the grinder you may end up spending money that will devalue the pen.

 

Many see broad nibs as a positive if you could swap it with someone for a medium and get that ground it maybe a better route. 

 

I wouldn't buy a used pen with a nib grind unless it's only example of the pen I can find but there are others who would. 

 

It's you decision at the end of the day. 



#7 Storch

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 19:22

How much thinner would you like to go?

Another option that you did not consider is just swapping out the nib (or is that what you meant by "vandalise"?).  They don't just unscrew, you need a special tool, but it is pretty easy once you have it.  If you would be interested in a medium, drop me a pm and we can talk.



#8 silverlifter

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 20:04

How much thinner would you like to go?


I'm generally more of an EF-M writer. B, especially a wet/wide one like this would just not see much use...
 

Another option that you did not consider is just swapping out the nib (or is that what you meant by "vandalise"?).  They don't just unscrew, you need a special tool, but it is pretty easy once you have it.  If you would be interested in a medium, drop me a pm and we can talk.


I hadn't considered swapping a nib. By "vandalising" I meant (semi-facetiously) having it ground down, as that is an irrevocable action :)


Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#9 sansenri

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 20:20

The Homo Sapiens, especially the Bronze, is one of those pens that outshines the nib.

It's a unique design and a unique material, and I think it's one of those pens that leaves a mark.

Since it's being discontinued it would seem like a pity to part with it because of the nib.

Are you sure you don't want to consider finding a more suitable nib for it?

I know this may cost you more that you had planned, but buying it with with the "wrong" nib was your fault in the first place...

Then again, I tend to go through nib phases, broads, stubs, fines, mediums... not sure about you, perhaps leaving it there for a while may help to rediscover it when you hit the broad phase... (I own a HS with a Pd B and love it!)



#10 silverlifter

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 20:49

The Homo Sapiens, especially the Bronze, is one of those pens that outshines the nib.

It's a unique design and a unique material, and I think it's one of those pens that leaves a mark.

Since it's being discontinued it would seem like a pity to part with it because of the nib.

Are you sure you don't want to consider finding a more suitable nib for it?

I know this may cost you more that you had planned, but buying it with with the "wrong" nib was your fault in the first place...

Then again, I tend to go through nib phases, broads, stubs, fines, mediums... not sure about you, perhaps leaving it there for a while may help to rediscover it when you hit the broad phase... (I own a HS with a Pd B and love it!)

 

I have thought about hanging on to it and seeing if my tastes change. But I have been using fountain pens continuously since the early 1980s and have fairly hardened habits of use over that time.

 

I do love *playing* with the nib, ie., writing a short phrase or two just to see the ink on the page,  but I can't use the pen for actual writing, which means it will likely just sit in a drawer, which seems a shame.

 

I had handled one of these in a B&M store some years ago, and really enjoyed the feel of the material, the capping mechanism, and loved the softness and look of the nib. But was not prepared to pay the retail price. Then, one shows up in an auction locally...

 

I knew the nib would be too broad when I put my bid in, I just didn't expect to win! :P

 

23kPd_writing_sample.jpg


Edited by silverlifter, 03 September 2020 - 20:52.

Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#11 pensmarht

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Posted 03 September 2020 - 23:03

How much thinner would you like to go?

Another option that you did not consider is just swapping out the nib (or is that what you meant by "vandalise"?).  They don't just unscrew, you need a special tool, but it is pretty easy once you have it.  If you would be interested in a medium, drop me a pm and we can talk.

I wasn't able to screw out my nib unit, but the nib and feed did come out of the housing when pulled. I didn't use a lot of force in doing this, and the pen writes as it did. I don't know if other users have done this or if it's good to do, but if you're having trouble and don't want to spend money on a tool, then this is an option.



#12 High_Noon

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Posted 19 September 2020 - 18:09

Personally, I would not grind that wonderful broad nib.  Keep it as is and if you really hate the broad or will not use it, simply swap out the nib for the size you prefer.  The Homo Sapiens Maxi is a rather nice pen and one I'd be proud to have in my collection - especially a broad!  


Edited by High_Noon, 19 September 2020 - 18:09.


#13 silverlifter

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Posted 19 September 2020 - 18:53

In the end, rather than having the nib ground, I sold the pen to someone who appreciates broad nibs. Best outcome for all concerned. :)


Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.




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