Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies



Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Is This My Imagination?

sailor nibs nib sizes

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 essayfaire

essayfaire

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 441 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2020 - 19:55

As some of you may know, I have been on the hunt for the right ink for my new Sailor Vega MF. It seems to me that the MF nib is no larger than the HF I have on my 1911S. Samples are with Sailor Jentle ink (black) in the 1911 and Oster Tokyo Blue Denim in the Vega. The MF doesnt seem as smooth, which is odd as it should be wider. Anyone else have similar experiences? It is more pronounced on my Peter Pauper Press journal than it is on, say, a newspaper crossword.

Apologies for the upside down images - new device that should make pictures easier once I have time to figure out how to use and rotate them.

Attached Images

  • 071DD0F4-437C-4BC6-AA77-71949DB3D0D8.jpeg
  • 39D8B914-09AE-4C39-AE94-00A183EFDB19.jpeg

Festina lente


Sponsored Content

#2 Intensity

Intensity

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,565 posts
  • Location:U.S.A.
  • Flag:

Posted 27 July 2020 - 23:17

Theres some variation between nibs, some might be more dry and produce finer lines, and vice versa. Take a look and see if the slit between the tones of your Fine is slightly wider than on the MF nib. I have a 21K Fine that now writes like a juicy medium. Dry nib with constricted spacing between the tines will generally give more feedback in writing. Also regular use can smooth out nib tipping compared to a brand new nib.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 


#3 A Smug Dill

A Smug Dill

    ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US.

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,814 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 28 July 2020 - 00:27

It seems to me that the MF nib is no larger than the HF I have on my 1911S. Samples are with Sailor Jentle ink (black) in the 1911 and Oster Tokyo Blue Denim in the Vega. The MF doesnt seem as smooth, which is odd as it should be wider.

 

 

That's not comparing like for like. Don't be lazy. If you really want to validate your observation, then at least disconnect the inked converters, clean and dry both pens' nibs the same way, then compare the writing output of the nibs using the same ink on the same sheet of paper by feeding them serially with the one converter. Both pens take the same converters, so you can just swap the ink reservoir over from one pen to the other. Then try it with the other inked converter. Or maybe even a third converter or ink.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.


#4 essayfaire

essayfaire

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 441 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 28 July 2020 - 20:12

That's not comparing like for like. Don't be lazy. If you really want to validate your observation, then at least disconnect the inked converters, clean and dry both pens' nibs the same way, then compare the writing output of the nibs using the same ink on the same sheet of paper by feeding them serially with the one converter. Both pens take the same converters, so you can just swap the ink reservoir over from one pen to the other. Then try it with the other inked converter. Or maybe even a third converter or ink.


Guilty as charged, though I thought it might be easier to use two cartridges.

Festina lente


#5 essayfaire

essayfaire

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 441 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2020 - 18:29

Like for like:

Attached Images

  • 2BBE04F9-C783-4C95-A711-320E02C0A51D.jpeg

Festina lente


#6 Intensity

Intensity

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,565 posts
  • Location:U.S.A.
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2020 - 18:42

There's some variation in individual nibs.  MF and F are supposed to be pretty similar.  So if including some small variation in nib setting on the feed, which can increase or decrease the tine spacing (slit size), there can be higher or lower ink flow which would result in different line thickness.


“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 


#7 essayfaire

essayfaire

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 441 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2020 - 19:00

There's some variation in individual nibs.  MF and F are supposed to be pretty similar.  So if including some small variation in nib setting on the feed, which can increase or decrease the tine spacing (slit size), there can be higher or lower ink flow which would result in different line thickness.

This makes sense - when I checked the tines they both have tines that are close together. The hole on the nib for the F actually seems larger than that on the MF.


So, do you agree that the MF doesn't look broader than the F?

Festina lente


#8 Intensity

Intensity

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,565 posts
  • Location:U.S.A.
  • Flag:

Posted 07 August 2020 - 20:01

The breather hole won’t make much difference, but the tine spacing at the tipping would.

 

It’s difficult to tell from your photograph, but they do look very similar.  From what I’ve read and seen, MF is pretty close to F.  Very gradual transition from F to MF to M, also complicated by inks, paper, and individual pen/nib variations.  The transition from F to EF is more dramatic and noticeable.


Edited by Intensity, 07 August 2020 - 20:02.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: sailor, nibs, nib sizes



Sponsored Content




|