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Regret And Return: A Tale Of Pilot Falcons

pilot falcon flex semiflex modern flex

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4 replies to this topic

#1 alexander_k

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Posted 11 July 2020 - 14:57

This wasn't my first Pilot Falcon. Years ago I had another, one with a metal body and a soft medium nib. It wasn't a success. I couldn't manage the flexibility of the nib and even less the ink flow. In the end, I gave up and passed it on. It wasn't my first or last failure with fountain pens but in this case I was left with the niggling suspicion that the main issue was the rather too generous flow, not the flex. 

So, when a few weeks ago a Pilot Falcon was advertised for sale at the local digital marketplace, I jumped at the opportunity and bought a nice, practically new Falcon with a soft fine nib from a hobbyist with an impressive collection. The new Falcon was made of resin, so it felt much lighter than the metal one but not uncomfortably so. Being large enough and well balanced, it rested safely and stably in my hand (always unposted), while the rather toothy nib sled effortlessly on paper. Unlike the medium nib of the old pen, the new fine nib remained under control without surprising me with gushes of ink, even with Rohrer and Klingner's Blau Permanent, a wet ink with the tendency to feather on 80 gr copy paper.  From the very first day I knew this Falcon was a keeper. 

I believe that the main reason for that was that in the intervening years between my first and second Falcon I had more exposure to various kinds of flex. With the experience gained, I had become more patient and controlled with semiflex nibs like the one on the new Falcon. Above all, however, my hunch was proved right: even though I preferred broader nibs, the soft medium on the Falcon was too much for my writing habits. The soft fine worked much better, similarly to most of my vintage flexy nibs, which seldom go above medium. 

Finally, how about comparing the soft fine Falcon nib to modern and vintage flex? Having no modern flexy nib inked at the moment, I compared it to a Nakaya Portable with a non-elastic medium nib. The Falcon was clearly softer and more responsive with a bit more line variation. A vintage semiflex, the Aikin Lambert Mercantile, was not much softer than the Falcon but more responsive. Flexible nibs, such as those on a Waterman's Ripple and a Conway Stewart Duro 2A were much softer and allowed for more line variation. The biggest difference, however, was that the vintage nibs were quit immune to railroading. By contrast, a fast or poorly controlled stroke with the Falcon resulted into railroading, which can be seen in the photograph. 

The conclusion is a happy one: the soft medium nib made all the difference and the new Falcon became one of the frequently used pens at my desk, especially as it brought out more shading in Blau Permanent than the two Sailors in which the ink has been used previously. 

 

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#2 ENewton

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Posted 11 July 2020 - 15:40

What a pleasant outcome from giving the model a second chance.  Thank you for describing your journey.

 

I am curious as to what number or proportion of your collection you would characterize as frequently used, and whether that privileged set consists of pens that are quite similar to one another or quite different and hence useful for different purposes.



#3 TheDutchGuy

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Posted 11 July 2020 - 15:48

Glad to hear that you found a Falcon which works well for you! A modern, reliable, affordable flex pen without a sac and with a good nib isn’t easy to find and the Falcon seems to have little competition in its price range. I’ve tried several but so far sparks did not fly (I guess I’m a bit spoilt by my vintage flex pen). The Falcon is still on my radar, though.



#4 alexander_k

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Posted 11 July 2020 - 16:13

What a pleasant outcome from giving the model a second chance.  Thank you for describing your journey.

 

I am curious as to what number or proportion of your collection you would characterize as frequently used, and whether that privileged set consists of pens that are quite similar to one another or quite different and hence useful for different purposes.

 

I'd say that at least 25 pens are inked and in use every week. Another 50 has to wait patiently for their turn, while slightly more than that are waiting to be repaired. Oh yes, and another 10-15 waits to be sold or given away. So, I'm proud to say that I've finally managed to reduce my collection to the bare minimum ;-)



#5 proton007

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Posted 12 July 2020 - 19:18


Finally, how about comparing the soft fine Falcon nib to modern and vintage flex? Having no modern flexy nib inked at the moment, I compared it to a Nakaya Portable with a non-elastic medium nib. The Falcon was clearly softer and more responsive with a bit more line variation. A vintage semiflex, the Aikin Lambert Mercantile, was not much softer than the Falcon but more responsive. Flexible nibs, such as those on a Waterman's Ripple and a Conway Stewart Duro 2A were much softer and allowed for more line variation. The biggest difference, however, was that the vintage nibs were quit immune to railroading. By contrast, a fast or poorly controlled stroke with the Falcon resulted into railroading, which can be seen in the photograph. 

 

I use the Falcon often for practicing Spencerian - contrary to popular opinion, I wouldn't say it's a 'flex' or even 'semi-flex' nib by any standards - it's a Japanese nib that produces minor line variation on the downstroke...my experience is that it needs so much force to flex that it ultimately digs into the paper and I lose control of the movement.

The grind is also somewhat different than the usual western nibs - sideways movement is scratchier than vertical movement, again, suitable for Japanese with lots of vertical strokes. The feed is also not designed to sustain flex beyond small strokes.

 

As a comparison, I tried a Pilot 53R from the 50s recently which also has  a 14k gold nib. It achieves a similar amount of flex with relatively little pressure, typical of pens of that era.

 

But, as others have mentioned, the Falcon a decent modern fountain pen for the price, with a 'finer than EF' nib for practicing Palmer or Spencerian.


Edited by proton007, 12 July 2020 - 19:23.

In a world where there are no eyes the sun would not be light, and in a world where there were no soft skins rocks would not be hard, nor in a world where there were no muscles would they be heavy. Existence is relationship and you're smack in the middle of it.

- Alan Watts






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pilot, falcon, flex, semiflex, modern flex



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