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Triumph Vs Skripsert Nibs, What Is The Difference?

triumph skripsert nib differences sheaffer stylist mkii

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13 replies to this topic

#1 gammada

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 23:50

My first vintage Sheaffer pen was a Triumph 550GT pen, that needless to say, wasn't equipped with a Triumph nib. But it was thanks to this pen that I found out about Sheaffer's legendary conical nibs. It's been a while since I've been under the impression that all Sheaffer conical nibs were denominated Triumph but just yesterday I got a Sheaffer Stylist MkII pen that sports a nib that is a conical one but seems to be referenced as "Skripsert".

 

Can anyone clarify what defines one or the other nib?

 

Thanks in advance!



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#2 IThinkIHaveAProblem

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 03:15

All about triumph nibs

http://www.richardsp...ibs/triumph.htm

 

definition of skripsert

http://www.richardsp...ref/gloss/S.htm

 

Happy reading. 

 

Congrats on the new pen! :)


Just give me the Parker 51s and nobody needs to get hurt.

#3 gammada

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 06:19

All about triumph nibs
http://www.richardsp...ibs/triumph.htm
 
definition of skripsert
http://www.richardsp...ref/gloss/S.htm
 
Happy reading. 
 
Congrats on the new pen! :)


Nice pointers, thanks!

So, the text there says that all Skripsert nibs were made of Palladium Silver, plated or 14k, do you happen to know if stainless steel version of this nib ever existed?

#4 joss

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 10:21

You have to differentiate between "Triumph" as the name of a Sheaffer pen model introduced in 1942 and the typical conical nib of the 1942 Sheaffer Triumph pens to which is referred to as a "Triumph nib".

 

Jim Mamoulides at PenHero explains here that Sheaffer dropped the name "Triumph" from their model range of pens in 1949 while the term "Triumph nib" continued to exist for the conical nibs on their existing line of pens (eg Touchdown).

 

The conical nib was also found on some early Sheaffer cartridge pens (the 1957 Sheaffer "875" and "500" and the 1958 Sheaffer Skripsert and Lady Sheaffer). Period advertisements for the Lady Sheaffer praise the "exclusive wrap-around Sheaffer Triumph point", indicating that Sheaffer also used the term "Triumph" for the conical nibs on their late 1950s-early 1960s cartridge pens.

 

The price of the Sheaffer Skripsert with conical nib started from $2.95 in 1958, which was the typical price for a school pen of that time (and also the price of the Sheaffer Skripriter ballpoint) so I guess that the cheapest Skripserts came with steel (not palladium) nibs. 

 

Sheaffer revived the name "Triumph" ca 1974 for a range of pens with inlaid or short arrow nib, that is the "Triumph 550" that you refer to.



#5 Estycollector

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Posted 03 July 2020 - 11:06

All about triumph nibs

http://www.richardsp...ibs/triumph.htm

 

definition of skripsert

http://www.richardsp...ref/gloss/S.htm

 

Happy reading. 

 

Congrats on the new pen! :)

 

Thank you. I find the Triumph nib pleasing to the eye and use. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#6 gammada

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 01:16

You have to differentiate between "Triumph" as the name of a Sheaffer pen model introduced in 1942 and the typical conical nib of the 1942 Sheaffer Triumph pens to which is referred to as a "Triumph nib".

 

Jim Mamoulides at PenHero explains here that Sheaffer dropped the name "Triumph" from their model range of pens in 1949 while the term "Triumph nib" continued to exist for the conical nibs on their existing line of pens (eg Touchdown).

 

The conical nib was also found on some early Sheaffer cartridge pens (the 1957 Sheaffer "875" and "500" and the 1958 Sheaffer Skripsert and Lady Sheaffer). Period advertisements for the Lady Sheaffer praise the "exclusive wrap-around Sheaffer Triumph point", indicating that Sheaffer also used the term "Triumph" for the conical nibs on their late 1950s-early 1960s cartridge pens.

 

The price of the Sheaffer Skripsert with conical nib started from $2.95 in 1958, which was the typical price for a school pen of that time (and also the price of the Sheaffer Skripriter ballpoint) so I guess that the cheapest Skripserts came with steel (not palladium) nibs. 

 

Sheaffer revived the name "Triumph" ca 1974 for a range of pens with inlaid or short arrow nib, that is the "Triumph 550" that you refer to.

I wonder if Sheaffer ever really had a marketing department. Their naming conventions and model variations are quite a tough act to follow. Just found out that I own a 1949 Touchdown Statesman than I always referred to as Thin Line.

 

Been reading with a lot of interest all info bits on PenHero.com and Richard Binder's site. Sheaffer really seems to be a brand worthy of a deep dive.  It would be nice to have a reference website as amazing as that of Parker Penography.

 

So, do you have any idea as to the selling price for the Stylist MkII pens? I'm still wondering if these came with steel or palladium silver nibs. Some people say unmarked nibs are steel, but I've found many references that state that palladium nibs were also produced unmarked.

 

Last but not least, I certainly knew the Stylist MkI was discontinued pretty soon, but assumed my pen was mid 70s vintage or later. Turns out, they ceased manufacturing them on 1970! IMHO, their design is quite modern and still looks contemporary to this day.



#7 IThinkIHaveAProblem

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 03:20

Nice pointers, thanks!

So, the text there says that all Skripsert nibs were made of Palladium Silver, plated or 14k, do you happen to know if stainless steel version of this nib ever existed?

  
You’re welcome

I have no idea if they came in steel or not. Sorry.

Thank you. I find the Triumph nib pleasing to the eye and use.


You’re welcome. I added another triumph nibbed snorkel to the collection today :). Working on restoring it now
Just give me the Parker 51s and nobody needs to get hurt.

#8 Estycollector

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 10:01

  
You’re welcome

I have no idea if they came in steel or not. Sorry.


You’re welcome. I added another triumph nibbed snorkel to the collection today :). Working on restoring it now

 

Wow, you've really fallen for those "snorkels". Congratulations. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#9 FredRydr

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 12:02

... It would be nice to have a reference website as amazing as that of Parker Penography....

Add this to the mix: http://dirck.delint....a/?page_id=6959



#10 Estycollector

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 13:24

 

Thank you. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#11 IThinkIHaveAProblem

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 16:35

Wow, you've really fallen for those "snorkels". Congratulations.


Thanks. And yup I really like the snorkel s. But i also added 2 “51” demis, a 17 and an English duo fold at the same time :)
Just give me the Parker 51s and nobody needs to get hurt.

#12 Estycollector

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 17:00

Thanks. And yup I really like the snorkel s. But i also added 2 “51” demis, a 17 and an English duo fold at the same time :)

 

I noticed my Sheaffer lever just unscrews and makes replacing a sac a  no brainer. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#13 IThinkIHaveAProblem

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 17:54

Thats neat!
Just give me the Parker 51s and nobody needs to get hurt.

#14 gammada

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Posted 04 July 2020 - 20:13

Right away! Thanks for the pointer.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: triumph, skripsert, nib, differences, sheaffer, stylist mkii



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