Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies



Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

I Would Like To Order A Hakase Fountain Pen


  • Please log in to reply
51 replies to this topic

#21 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 29 July 2020 - 08:04

Thank you for the responses.
 
I wanted to ask another question.  Am not sure if I should ask here or start another tread.
 
Thinking of getting a customised FP and the choices are between a Nakaya vs Hakase.  I am just wondering which route to go.  One is a platinum nib with Urushi over ebonite and one is main Pilot nibs with various wood offering but it seems to be at a higher price level.
 
I wonder if you have had such deliberations before.  I have both pilot and platinum nibs and appreciate the differences between both and use both.

I have both several custom Nakayas, and several custom Hakases. The process is really as different as the pens. With Nakaya you will be dealing with a relatively faceless conglomerate or going through a third party as you ask and they interpret. With Hakase you will be dealing directly and solely with the man who will make your actual pen.

Their aesthetics and ethos are very different. One uses relatively pedestrian materials (if you can call ebonite and urushi pedestrian) and is in effect a nicely decorated Platinum; the other uses exotic materials and, Pilot nib feed and filling system aside, is fully hand made. If you can, watch a video of Hakase threads being cut - it's mesmerizing. All furniture on Hakase is either hand-beaten solid silver or solid gold. On a Nakaya, it isn't.

Of course you pay for these differences and the delta is huge. That said, I personally believe a Hakase is worth every penny.


Too many pens; too little writing.

Sponsored Content

#22 Linger

Linger

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 84 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 29 July 2020 - 09:18

A few more elements to contemplate, perhaps, are the labour you pay for, and the character of the used nibs.

 

With the Nakaya urushi pens, a lot of labour goes into the various layers of paint and lacquer. The result is stunning, but so is the price. With the fully hand-made Hakase, all the labour goes in the construction, the balance, the working and the finish of the pen. The base materials can be fair (celluloid and ebonite), expensive (woods), or very expensive (buffalo horn and toroise shell). And you can add the gold details to that. But the amount of hours in producing the pens are spent on different activities.

 

In fact, I have a “standard” Nakaya on order, a portable cigar bamboo woods, the price of which is more extravagant than the Hakase I own (new jade celluloid), than the Hakase I have on order (black & red ebonite), and the Hakases I have on my wishlist (wood and horn). It might be just me, but the money spent on a Hakase seems “better” spent.

 

The nibs used are both excellent, but have different character, and you should try to figure out what works better for you. Platinum/Nakaya nibs tend to be finer and slightly more susceptible to giving feedback and “scratchiness” (please forgive the choice of words here). Pilot/Namiki nibs are s m o o t h... Both nibs work super for me, albeit on different paper, but with a gun to head I would choose Pilot over Platinum. (And the Sailor KoP 21K nib trumps them all, but that is another story.)

 

In conclusion, I have both, use both, very much like both, but would prefer Hakase.



#23 cll

cll

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 29 July 2020 - 10:14

Thank you all for the elaborate thought process in making your purchases.  I have been at the Hakase and Nakaya websites numerous times and both pens are of great beauty and no doubt will write well.

 

I agree that if only Hakase uses a Sailor KOP nib or perhaps a Pilot #30 nib...... Haha

 

The allure of a handmade pen from the scratch seems to be calling.....



#24 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 29 July 2020 - 16:13

Just to help you along - my custom Nakayas and Hakases.

 

Even though I have a strong preference for Hakase, you really can't go wrong.

 

Wg3nebj.jpg


Too many pens; too little writing.

#25 cll

cll

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 02:00

Just to help you along - my custom Nakayas and Hakases.

 

Even though I have a strong preference for Hakase, you really can't go wrong.

 

Wg3nebj.jpg

 

 

WOW and WOW!!

 

So beautiful.

 

Which is your favourite amongst these beauties?



#26 rhk

rhk

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 392 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 06:36

I could not resist after Mongrelnomads picture. I have some Hakase's, and quite a few Nakaya's. I love both types of pen, but they are different. Hakase has more natural materials (wood, water buffel horn), Nakaya is almost all lacquer. Having ordered one-off pens from both, I confirm that the ordering process is different. With Hakase, you talk directly to Yamamoto-san in his workshop. In the case of Nakaya, emails are usually answered by ms Kato who will relay the information to the backoffice. Yamamoto-san has visited the Netherlands in 2016, last year the nibmeister of Hakase visited Sakura Fountainpen Gallery in Belgium. It is also possible to visit the workshop of Hakase in Tottori (as I have done). 

 

I would say that the nib offerings of Nakaya are broader: different materials (two tone gold, gold, rodium plated, etc), and different types (from ultra extra fine to extra broad, music, hard or soft), but Hakase will grind a nib to a stub if you ask him to. As shown in the picture below, Hakase offers an additional section with your pen, something that Nakaya does not. I have not had any problem with the feed of either brand.

 

IMG_2056.jpeg

 

IMG_2057.jpeg

 

IMG_2058.jpeg



#27 cll

cll

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 07:40

I could not resist after Mongrelnomads picture. I have some Hakase's, and quite a few Nakaya's. I love both types of pen, but they are different. Hakase has more natural materials (wood, water buffel horn), Nakaya is almost all lacquer. Having ordered one-off pens from both, I confirm that the ordering process is different. With Hakase, you talk directly to Yamamoto-san in his workshop. In the case of Nakaya, emails are usually answered by ms Kato who will relay the information to the backoffice. Yamamoto-san has visited the Netherlands in 2016, last year the nibmeister of Hakase visited Sakura Fountainpen Gallery in Belgium. It is also possible to visit the workshop of Hakase in Tottori (as I have done). 

 

I would say that the nib offerings of Nakaya are broader: different materials (two tone gold, gold, rodium plated, etc), and different types (from ultra extra fine to extra broad, music, hard or soft), but Hakase will grind a nib to a stub if you ask him to. As shown in the picture below, Hakase offers an additional section with your pen, something that Nakaya does not. I have not had any problem with the feed of either brand.

 

IMG_2056.jpeg

 

IMG_2057.jpeg

 

IMG_2058.jpeg

 

 

Another jaw dropping picture of how beautiful the pens are.  They definitely are worthy of the reputation that have followed these brands.

 

Would I be correct to say that Hakase will have limited nib variations (as in cursive italics, oblique nibs?)



#28 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 07:51

 
 
Another jaw dropping picture of how beautiful the pens are.  They definitely are worthy of the reputation that have followed these brands.
 
Would I be correct to say that Hakase will have limited nib variations (as in cursive italics, oblique nibs?)

My nib requests have generally been rather pedestrian (MF, for the most part) but I will say that Ryo-San is one of the most talented nibsmiths Ive dealt with. I doubt a cursive italic or an oblique would be outside the realms of his work. I will say that I prefer my Hakase nibs to my Nakayas, whether ground by Nakaya themselves, or John Mottishaw.
Too many pens; too little writing.

#29 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 08:00

I could not resist after Mongrelnomads picture. I have some Hakase's, and quite a few Nakaya's. I love both types of pen, but they are different. Hakase has more natural materials (wood, water buffel horn), Nakaya is almost all lacquer. Having ordered one-off pens from both, I confirm that the ordering process is different. With Hakase, you talk directly to Yamamoto-san in his workshop. In the case of Nakaya, emails are usually answered by ms Kato who will relay the information to the backoffice. Yamamoto-san has visited the Netherlands in 2016, last year the nibmeister of Hakase visited Sakura Fountainpen Gallery in Belgium. It is also possible to visit the workshop of Hakase in Tottori (as I have done). 
 
I would say that the nib offerings of Nakaya are broader: different materials (two tone gold, gold, rodium plated, etc), and different types (from ultra extra fine to extra broad, music, hard or soft), but Hakase will grind a nib to a stub if you ask him to. As shown in the picture below, Hakase offers an additional section with your pen, something that Nakaya does not. I have not had any problem with the feed of either brand.
 
IMG_2056.jpeg
 
IMG_2057.jpeg
 
IMG_2058.jpeg


Those are some beautiful pens ;)
Too many pens; too little writing.

#30 como

como

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,000 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 08:51

Thank you for sharing your beautiful collection. These are absolutely stunning! I just had a look at their website, and also like the simplistic rosewood very much, a very traditional material for oriental furniture and ages beautifully. Maybe I shouldn’t have looked but they are wonderful :-)))))

Just to help you along - my custom Nakayas and Hakases.

 

Even though I have a strong preference for Hakase, you really can't go wrong.

 

Wg3nebj.jpg



#31 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 08:53

Thank you for sharing your beautiful collection. These are absolutely stunning! I just had a look at their website, and also like the simplistic rosewood very much, a very traditional material for oriental furniture and ages beautifully. Maybe I shouldnt have looked but they are wonderful :-)))))


Hakases woods are, in my opinion, their standouts.

Left to right, the pens are: horn and tortoise, burl, horn and cocobolo. Im trying to resist the temptation to add an Ebony.
Too many pens; too little writing.

#32 como

como

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,000 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 09:22

Just superb finishes and still maintains the authentic feel of the natural material. Well, seeing what you have, may I guess that resistance is not your strength?  :D

Hakases woods are, in my opinion, their standouts.

Left to right, the pens are: horn and tortoise, burl, horn and cocobolo. Im trying to resist the temptation to add an Ebony.



#33 mongrelnomad

mongrelnomad

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,501 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 10:07

Just superb finishes and still maintains the authentic feel of the natural material. Well, seeing what you have, may I guess that resistance is not your strength?  :D

Lol.

No, Im actually quite rational (or so I like to think). This collection has been built up over a decade.

Note that the burl is covered by a layer of clear urushi and so you cant feel the texture of the wood...
Too many pens; too little writing.

#34 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 18:41

Thank you for the responses.

 

I wanted to ask another question.  Am not sure if I should ask here or start another tread.

 

Thinking of getting a customised FP and the choices are between a Nakaya vs Hakase.  I am just wondering which route to go.  One is a platinum nib with Urushi over ebonite and one is main Pilot nibs with various wood offering but it seems to be at a higher price level.

 

I wonder if you have had such deliberations before.  I have both pilot and platinum nibs and appreciate the differences between both and use both.

I’ve actually owned various Nakayas.  Love, absolutely love Nakaya fountain pens.  Well built, beautiful urushi and maki-e work and the pens write like a dream.  That being said, I have sold all my Nakaya pens (around 5), but I still have my two Hakase fountain pens.  I briefly thought about selling my Hakase Amboyna Burl but came to my senses.  I don’t plan to sell either pens unless I really need to.  That should say something.

 

Hakase fountain pens are custom made to your specifications, and the material they use for some of their pens are rare (albeit pretty expensive).  The wood crafting is pretty difficult from what I’ve been told and the furniture on Hakase fountain pens is 14k gold.  You could go either way and be happy, but I would recommend having at least one Hakase in your collection if you can afford it.



#35 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 18:43

Thank you all for the elaborate thought process in making your purchases.  I have been at the Hakase and Nakaya websites numerous times and both pens are of great beauty and no doubt will write well.

 

I agree that if only Hakase uses a Sailor KOP nib or perhaps a Pilot #30 nib...... Haha

 

The allure of a handmade pen from the scratch seems to be calling.....

I believe Hakase used to use Sailor nibs in the past.  Not sure if you could ask Hakase if they could get a Sailor KOP nib for you.



#36 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 18:45

Hakases woods are, in my opinion, their standouts.

Left to right, the pens are: horn and tortoise, burl, horn and cocobolo. Im trying to resist the temptation to add an Ebony.

Get the ebony :). Really nice weight due to the density of the wood and the wood itself is beautiful to behold.  Mine is over 4 years old and I never get tired of looking at it.  The only thing I would have asked Hakase is if I could have applied urushi to it.  Ebony wood is dense and less porous so its relatively protected from moisture.  But that nice wet urushi look on the ebony would have been beautiful :).



#37 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 18:48

I would consider one more Hakase to add to my prime collection: a African Ebony flat-top with tortoise shell on the barrel and tortoise shell finials.  I am deterred by the possible cost, but the main reason for not ordering is that they don’t ship out any of their tortoise shell pens. I would have to go to Japan to pick it up which would actually be a nice trip.



#38 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 18:51

I could not resist after Mongrelnomads picture. I have some Hakase's, and quite a few Nakaya's. I love both types of pen, but they are different. Hakase has more natural materials (wood, water buffel horn), Nakaya is almost all lacquer. Having ordered one-off pens from both, I confirm that the ordering process is different. With Hakase, you talk directly to Yamamoto-san in his workshop. In the case of Nakaya, emails are usually answered by ms Kato who will relay the information to the backoffice. Yamamoto-san has visited the Netherlands in 2016, last year the nibmeister of Hakase visited Sakura Fountainpen Gallery in Belgium. It is also possible to visit the workshop of Hakase in Tottori (as I have done). 

 

I would say that the nib offerings of Nakaya are broader: different materials (two tone gold, gold, rodium plated, etc), and different types (from ultra extra fine to extra broad, music, hard or soft), but Hakase will grind a nib to a stub if you ask him to. As shown in the picture below, Hakase offers an additional section with your pen, something that Nakaya does not. I have not had any problem with the feed of either brand.

 

IMG_2056.jpeg

 

IMG_2057.jpeg

 

IMG_2058.jpeg

How do you like the Nakaya Yatate pen case?  I’ve been thinking about ordering one for a while but I was worried the pen could be damaged during transport.  Is there a lining inside and what is the lining made out of?  Thank you!



#39 rhk

rhk

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 392 posts

Posted 30 July 2020 - 19:54

How do you like the Nakaya Yatate pen case?  I’ve been thinking about ordering one for a while but I was worried the pen could be damaged during transport.  Is there a lining inside and what is the lining made out of?  Thank you!

It has a cloth lining inside so that the pen is not damaged. I don’t remember how Nakaya shipped this, I think the pen and the pen case were separate, with the pen in the usual box.



#40 hawpunch

hawpunch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 July 2020 - 21:33

It has a cloth lining inside so that the pen is not damaged. I don’t remember how Nakaya shipped this, I think the pen and the pen case were separate, with the pen in the usual box.

Thank you! I’ll probably order one in the near future.  Unfortunately, given the beauty of the pen case, I may need a case for that as well lol.








Sponsored Content




|