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Shake It Carefully.....


14 replies to this topic

#1 Thymen

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 20:13

Dear Pen Friends;

 

please let me warn you, when you shake a pen to get the last drops op water out of it after cleaning, to keep it well free from the sink. I found out today that gold nibs do not like it when they hit a hard surface....

 

:gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:  :gaah:

 

:crybaby:

 

 

Fortunately the nib was bent just a tiny bit. I managed to straighten it, and the tines were only ever so slightly misaligned.

I kicked myself for not trying it out with a Jinhao nib first......



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#2 WLSpec

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 02:23

Oh no! Maybe better to do this with the cap on and then dry it out. 



#3 Honeybadgers

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 02:35

I may or may not have done that to a visconti homo sapiens....

 

Thankfully I was able to straighten it back to 100% without any visible damage but you could've clipped a cigar with my butt when I saw what I did.


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#4 Ron Z

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 10:59

This will keep that from happening, and it's much more efficient.


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#5 WLSpec

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 18:59

This will keep that from happening, and it's much more efficient.

I used this the other day, but just thoroughly taped the pen down in the spinner. Works very well! 



#6 I-am-not-really-here

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 19:35

This will keep that from happening, and it's much more efficient.

That thread is the most entertaining one I have read on FPN.



#7 sansenri

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 20:35

Ron's centrifuge is a great idea, however somewhat bulky...

I use the arm centrifuge... but always, always wrap the pen in a cloth and hold it firmly by the nib and barrel as I swing the arm, well away from any obstacle...

The excess water wets the cloth and tells you when there's no more...

otherwise if you are not in a hurry, as many will tell you, leave it nib down on a peace of paper tissue...



#8 Ron Z

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 20:39

Well, I used to.  When  you get older your arms and wrists don't like it so much...  


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#9 Ron Z

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Posted 22 June 2020 - 20:40

That thread is the most entertaining one I have read on FPN.

I agree.  We had some great and funny people on FPN  back then.  I miss them.


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#10 corgicoupe

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 02:19

I remember a "Mr Bean" video where he was making a sandwich while sitting on a park bench. The lettuce was wet so he took off a sock and put the lettuce in the sock and swung it around to dry it. Might work for a pen, too, but the ink might stain the tip of the sock. :rolleyes:


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For love of it. And yet not waste time either.

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#11 A Smug Dill

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 06:27

I use the arm centrifuge... but always, always wrap the pen in a cloth and hold it firmly by the nib and barrel as I swing the arm, well away from any obstacle...

The excess water wets the cloth and tells you when there's no more...

 

I usually wrap my pen components in a kitchen paper towel — which gives me better grip, as well as traps and absorbs any possibly staining droplets that fly out, just in case the items aren't as clean as I thought they were — before swinging my arm to "shake" them dry.

 

There was the time when I had the front half of my wife's Pilot Capless raden "galaxy" Vanishing Point (barrel only) wrapped in a paper towel, and I swung ... and the nose cone went straight through the newly formed wet spot on the paper towel, so the piece ended up hitting the floor tiles at high velocity, landing on the threaded part where the two halves of the barrel join. :(


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.

#12 Paul-in-SF

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Posted 17 July 2020 - 22:15

Usually I wad up a tissue and hold securely it in my left hand, hold the pen in my right hand and tap the nib into the wad of tissue. If it is a lever filler, I work the lever up and down with my right forefinger while doing so (dexterous, ain't I?). This allows me to see when the water is effectively out as well as to make sure the water coming out is clear enough to satisfy me (it's almost never quite perfect). 

 

I did drop a small gold nib down the bathroom sink drain once. It did not make it to the trap, it got stuck on the side of the straight-down pipe. I imagine it's still there. If I ever have to have a plumber work on that drain, I will try to retrieve it. I wasn't shaking anything when this happened, I was just trying to rinse it off and I forgot to close the drain. 



#13 markh

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 00:07

I take a roll of t.p. flat side up. Gently slide the pen nib/feed between layers and let it sit for a few minutes. Quickly sucks water out.

 

Roll can be re-used many times.

 

I have taken to using a large nail to separate the layers before inserting to avoid getting any tissue paper between the nib and feed.

 

.



#14 Astron

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 15:48

I let a soft tissue paper suck out the water from the feed and dry all others corners of the grip section with a Q-Tip. Though my Lamys are quite low maintenance pens.



#15 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 17:43

I fold a paper towel, stick the pen in it and shake the pen like an old thermometer,,,,then leave the pen in the folded paper.... in a different spot.

The next day it's all good and dry.

 

It is helpful to have two pens or four.

 

Ron has space....and doesn't have a pen cleaning year.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 




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