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Pen Grip Tips For Lefties?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 linkoiram

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 05:07

Up until a year ago I had an irregular grip and a sidewriter writing style, and as I transitioned into fountain pens primarily I have adopted a tripod grip and an underwriting style so as not to smudge my writing.

Now I am trying to write with a lighter hand to more comfortably improve my handwriting. Although I've read pretty much every archived thread about this topic, I notice that there is very little input on exactly how your fingers are positioned when it comes to directions or the clock and in regards to where the pen rests on the middle finger, especially for left handed people. I notice I tend to have the pen rest on my middle finger in between the first and second knuckle, which is comfortable but it sets my index finger squarely on top of the section in line with the nib. Many that rest the pen just below the first knuckle with respect to the fingernail have a more spread out finger grip that I would like to adopt. I have gotten better at being able to write with less pressure in this way, but I found myself writing with a mechanical pencil with this grip and it kept slipping out. I am considering picking up a pilot vanishing point so if I could try to teach myself to hold a pen in a more standard way then it would make the pen more pleasant to use. Picture related has the modified grip style that I am trying to adopt where the index is about at 1 o'clock and the thumb and middle finger and 10 and 5 o'clock, respectively. If I rest the pen above the knuckle I find the index goes to about 12 o'clock exactly.


Am I overthinking this idea? As a kid I don't remember ever being taught how to write or hold a pencil in any way differently from right handed children which I take it is what leads some people to develop weird grips and writing angles like my brother as an overwriter. Since I've taken to making my writing experience better I tend to notice the way others hold writing utensils more and more, especially lefties, but it seems like there is no standard way for them.

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Edited by linkoiram, 26 March 2020 - 05:11.


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#2 BDarchitect

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 05:32

After five plus decades of being a lefty side writer, about two years ago I made the disciplined and patient determination to change to writing from under the line, and the investment in that practice has been enormously rewarding.  My handwriting clarity and the comfort and ease of writing are all greatly improved.

I hold my pen similarly to your photo, tip view on, and from the side I set my thumb back a bit to lightly press the pen against the side of my middle finger and the index finger metacarpal joint.  That works well for pencils and other pens, holding them in place so I don’t have to use a death grip between my index and middle fingers.  

Using the writing baseline as the 0-180 degree line, with zero to the right, my pen is angled at about 80-260 degrees when viewed overhead, and held at about a 50 degree elevation angle off the page when viewed from the side.  In this manner my whole arm moves up and down in a common line with vertical letter strokes (which lean forward about 10 degrees off vertical) and my fingers move sideways for horizontal and rounded strokes, all coordinated in a miracle of muscle memory. 



#3 Anderglan

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 06:57

Up until a year ago I had an irregular grip and a sidewriter writing style, and as I transitioned into fountain pens primarily I have adopted a tripod grip and an underwriting style so as not to smudge my writing.

I guess I know what you mean by "tripod grip", it's really not so easy especially when one has once formed a habit of "buckling" the pointer (as I guess you have that habit according to your picture) ...
Anyways, there's one tripod grip contraption I know of that works quite fine both for right handed and for left handed persons, and both for e.g. elementary school kids and for senior citizens having arthristis &c., but I'm not sure it's available in the U.S.A. --- it's called "Dr. Sattler's" or "Sattler's grip".


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Alexander W.–G.


#4 linkoiram

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 15:37

I guess I know what you mean by "tripod grip", it's really not so easy especially when one has once formed a habit of "buckling" the pointer (as I guess you have that habit according to your picture) ...
Anyways, there's one tripod grip contraption I know of that works quite fine both for right handed and for left handed persons, and both for e.g. elementary school kids and for senior citizens having arthristis &c., but I'm not sure it's available in the U.S.A. --- it's called "Dr. Sattler's" or "Sattler's grip".


Yeah I've been trying to work on not flexing my index finger when writing. With fountain pens it isn't so tough but it is a conscious effort but if I don't grip tightly pencils do slip. Could be that specific pencil being a slippery one.

#5 Anderglan

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 17:39

Yeah I've been trying to work on not flexing my index finger when writing. With fountain pens it isn't so tough but it is a conscious effort but if I don't grip tightly pencils do slip. Could be that specific pencil being a slippery one.

Here are some tips what to do against flexing or "buckling" a finger -- it's from an instrumentalist's (cellist's) POV, but most of it applies also when we're talking how to hold a pen:

 

http://cellopractice...ile-hypermobile

http://cellopractice...ow-hand-edition


all välgång
Alexander W.–G.







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