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Pilot Converter Identification

con20 9007 pilot elite

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8 replies to this topic

#1 KingsCountyWriter

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 03:32

Greetings. I just opened up a couple of Pilot Elites for cleaning. I have 2 completely different converters! I can identify the Con-20, but does anyone have a clue about the other 2? Are they knockoff Con-20s? 

 

The top converter is inscribed PRESS HERE PILOT 9007 on the mechanism that depresses to release the liquid. It has threads which make it slightly longer than the Con-20. The middle converter has the "PRESS HERE" but no "PILOT MADE IN JAPAN". The middle one also seems as if its insert is clear, rather than the blue of the Con-20. The Con-20 (or what I believe is a Con-20) is on the bottom. 

 

The mystery converters are from Pilot Elite with gold plated nibs.

 

AC561792-D736-4B0F-B1D1-5E8980B0896B.JPG


Edited by KingsCountyWriter, 16 March 2020 - 03:36.


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#2 awa54

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 04:49

the top CON20 has a cartridge nipple lodged in the mouth... the other two look like CON20 converters as well.  I have several of these ranging from late 1960s manufacture (at least that was the age of the pens they came with), to 2010s, there are slight detail changes in production, like the color of the mouth (black on the oldest, varying opacity translucent blue for newer) and the presser bar; some dovetail into the slots in the shroud others don't.

 

The CONW has a protruding catridge interface and the newest variant (CONB?) has an exposed loop for a presser bar.


Edited by awa54, 17 March 2020 - 04:26.

David-

 

So many restoration projects...


#3 KingsCountyWriter

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 16:15

Should I pull out the cartridge nipple? It seems like its securely lodged in there. Does that mean its from a cartridge that broke off?

Can anyone point me toward a video that I might use to disassemble the Elite in order to take a look at whats in there?

#4 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 18:17

Should I pull out the cartridge nipple? It seems like its securely lodged in there. Does that mean its from a cartridge that broke off?
 

 

No... It is from a PEN that is now missing the fitting for any cartridge or converter. Appears that the nipple was meant to be screwed into the pen section -- and then remain there.
 



#5 kpong11

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 23:08

Just turn that converter (with nipple) onto the section till it's tight. Then just pull the converter out.

#6 KingsCountyWriter

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 02:12

Just turn that converter (with nipple) onto the section till it's tight. Then just pull the converter out.

Thanks. I'll give that a try. 



#7 awa54

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 04:34

Should I pull out the cartridge nipple? It seems like its securely lodged in there. Does that mean its from a cartridge that broke off?

Can anyone point me toward a video that I might use to disassemble the Elite in order to take a look at whats in there?

 

 

The way that Pilot cartridged are breached, is for a protruding half-round portion of the cartridge fitting to flip the colored plastic disc which seals the cart. 90 degrees rather than piercing the plastic like most others (or dislocating a ball as a few types do).  If you twist the cartridge while inserting it you can wind up just pushing the disc farther in to the cartridge without it flipping open, so for most reliable operation, don't twist Pilot carts when you insert them.

 

Almost all Pilot pens that take the current design cartridges use the cartridge fitting as a retaining lock ring to keep the feed seated and sealed in the section.  To properly disassemble and reassemble these pens, you really should have a special wrench that can be home made from 7mm OD brass tubing (or purchased from a few Japanese Ebay sellers).  The exceptions are pens with plastic section threads and clear ink-view windows, in those the whole cartridge fitting just unscrews from the section.  The Grandee and Deluxe series pens also have more complex disassembly protocols, so don't try forcing their feeds out the back of the section without removing the nib and section tip first.

 

here's a picture of the tools I made for Japanese pen disassembly, the larger one is for Pilot, the smaller 6mm version fits similar lockrings in Platinum and Sailor pens.

Attached Images

  • pilot plat tools.jpg

Edited by awa54, 17 March 2020 - 04:46.

David-

 

So many restoration projects...


#8 KingsCountyWriter

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Posted 19 March 2020 - 00:05

Just turn that converter (with nipple) onto the section till it's tight. Then just pull the converter out.

This worked perfectly. Thanks!



#9 KingsCountyWriter

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Posted 19 March 2020 - 00:06

 

 

The way that Pilot cartridged are breached, is for a protruding half-round portion of the cartridge fitting to flip the colored plastic disc which seals the cart. 90 degrees rather than piercing the plastic like most others (or dislocating a ball as a few types do).  If you twist the cartridge while inserting it you can wind up just pushing the disc farther in to the cartridge without it flipping open, so for most reliable operation, don't twist Pilot carts when you insert them.

 

Almost all Pilot pens that take the current design cartridges use the cartridge fitting as a retaining lock ring to keep the feed seated and sealed in the section.  To properly disassemble and reassemble these pens, you really should have a special wrench that can be home made from 7mm OD brass tubing (or purchased from a few Japanese Ebay sellers).  The exceptions are pens with plastic section threads and clear ink-view windows, in those the whole cartridge fitting just unscrews from the section.  The Grandee and Deluxe series pens also have more complex disassembly protocols, so don't try forcing their feeds out the back of the section without removing the nib and section tip first.

 

here's a picture of the tools I made for Japanese pen disassembly, the larger one is for Pilot, the smaller 6mm version fits similar lockrings in Platinum and Sailor pens.

Thanks for the instruction, but I think this is way above my pay grade. A possible project for when I have the time in the future to machine tools. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: con20, 9007, pilot, elite



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