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Modifying Plastic Feed

feed modify feed wet plastic feed

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12 replies to this topic

#1 The-Thinker

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 11:42

i was going to asked if someone has tried to modify their plastic fountain pen feed, how did they do it. Extra bonus if it is a sailor 

 



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#2 CS388

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 13:48

I've deepened the feed channels on a plastic feed, to increase the flow. I did this with a file and sandpaper.

There was some increase in flow - but it was a hit-and-miss affair, rather than an exact science, in my hands!

I've also used wax to fill in the channels to decrease flow.

 

This was experimental stuff on old worthless pens, so I had nothing to lose.

I'd think twice, or wait for more accurate advice, before chopping into your Sailor!

 

Good luck.



#3 The-Thinker

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 17:57

I've deepened the feed channels on a plastic feed, to increase the flow. I did this with a file and sandpaper.

There was some increase in flow - but it was a hit-and-miss affair, rather than an exact science, in my hands!

I've also used wax to fill in the channels to decrease flow.

 

This was experimental stuff on old worthless pens, so I had nothing to lose.

I'd think twice, or wait for more accurate advice, before chopping into your Sailor!

 

Good luck.

 

so you felt a difference in wetness ? or was it not that noticeable and worth the hassle



#4 Anderglan

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 18:10

I found this here

http://tortugavacuma...pluma-lamy.html

I hope it shall help :)


all välgång
Alexander W.–G.


#5 The-Thinker

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 18:52

I found this here

http://tortugavacuma...pluma-lamy.html

I hope it shall help :)

 

i wonder if the sailor feeds are the same and i can use the same method ! 



#6 Ron Z

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 19:11

Be very careful modifying a feed.  It is entirely possible to make things worse, or make the feed useless.  A razor saw at the widest....

 

You may find it instructive to go to the link at the top of the repair forum and follow the link in "The Science Behind Pen Repair."  There is a section on feed design.  You'll understand why I say, "Be careful."


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#7 The-Thinker

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 20:41

Be very careful modifying a feed.  It is entirely possible to make things worse, or make the feed useless.  A razor saw at the widest....

 

You may find it instructive to go to the link at the top of the repair forum and follow the link in "The Science Behind Pen Repair."  There is a section on feed design.  You'll understand why I say, "Be careful."

 

you mean the link that goes to this site https://fountainpend...s-from-plastic/



#8 Ron Z

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 23:02

 

you mean the link that goes to this site https://fountainpend...s-from-plastic/

Yup, though I find the whole site to be interesting reading.


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#9 The-Thinker

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 13:18

Yup, though I find the whole site to be interesting reading.

 

i read quite a few articles! being a physics major i find it interesting how he integrated formulas in the explanation (Something that i was looking for ) . The only problem is i felt it too technical and did not mention about how you can achieve your goal (make nib wetter or drier) . I did get the whole part of the material and the channels and how detailed everything works to balance, but was wondering if sailors (or all other nib designs) are made that way, and if they work on the same principle. 



#10 Ron Z

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 13:58

I don't think that was the intent of the article.  The principles are there, and effect feeds whatever brand.  There's a project for you - figure out what you can do while still within the guidelines. 

 

I find that many times wetter can be achieved by adjusting the nib, rather than the feed.  There are some limited modifications out there, but I'm always cautious about modifying the feed, and the ink channels in particular.  Given his information, I would try to make the bottom of the slit square, which leaves out a razor blade or knife, which would likely cause a V, instead of it being square.  There are some really fine razor saws out there.  I bought mine years ago, so not sure where you'd find them now. 


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#11 bsenn

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 16:07

Try guitar nut files.
IMG_20200222_134410782~2.jpg

Brian

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#12 tinta

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 21:19

i was going to asked if someone has tried to modify their plastic fountain pen feed, how did they do it. Extra bonus if it is a sailor 

 

Why would you want to do it to a Sailor feed?  In my experience, Sailor's feeds are consistently good performers.


*Sailor 1911S, Black/gold, 14c. 0.8 mm. stub(JM) *1911S blue "Colours", 14c. H-B "M" BLS (PB) *2 Sailor 1911S Burgundy/gold: 14c. 0.6 mm. "round-nosed" CI (MM) & 1.1 mm. CI (JM) *Sailor Pro-Gear Slim Spec. Ed. "Fire",14c. (factory) "H-B" *Kaweco SPECIAL FP: 14c.,-0.6 mm BLS, (PB) *Kaweco Stainless Steel Lilliput, 14c "M" -0.4 mm.BLS, (PB)

#13 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 13:31

 

i read quite a few articles! being a physics major i find it interesting how he integrated formulas in the explanation (Something that i was looking for ) . The only problem is i felt it too technical and did not mention about how you can achieve your goal (make nib wetter or drier) . I did get the whole part of the material and the channels and how detailed everything works to balance, but was wondering if sailors (or all other nib designs) are made that way, and if they work on the same principle. 

I guess if you understand capillary action... a deeper ink canal delivers more ink to the nib. -_- HOWEVER, at some stage, you also must allow more air to get into the reservoir.  Opening the airlock makes things messy!  The feed becomes more vulnerable to shock and environmental changes (temperature and pressure).  Before I would temper with the feed (which is tuned to max ink flow, because one feed needs to be able to supply ink to nibs with varying width, thus ink demands) check what you can do by varying the nib,

 

Makes sense?  :rolleyes:

 

Tell us what you find, please.   :thumbup:


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