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Dry Ink And Dry Pen Combo


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8 replies to this topic

#1 IndieNote

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:27

Hi!

What will happen if you use a dry ink with a dry pen? Is there a way to make this combo work efficiently and smoothly?

Thanks in advance.

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#2 corniche

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:38

What will happen if you use a dry ink with a dry pen?


You'll switch to gel pens. :rolleyes:

Hi IndieNote,

If you're stuck with cheap paper; you're better off using a dry ink like Pelikan or Lamy in a normal pen; e.g., a Pilot Explorer and go with a finer nib.

Sean :)
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#3 JulieParadise

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:39

I see at least 3 possible consequences:

 

1) No fun. It just won't flow well.  :(

2) Congrats! You just found the perfect combo for this definitely not ink friendly paper you always searched for!  :bunny01:  :thumbup:

3) --> 1) No fun! Not at all!!! Just desert dry scratchiness. Uff. :unsure:  +   :huh:  +   B)    Solution: Switch pen/ink or make pen (i.e. nib) wetter.  :D


Edited by JulieParadise, 14 February 2020 - 11:40.


#4 ENewton

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 04:28

A dry ink that is vivid and well lubricated can provide a satisfying experience even in a relatively dry pen.

 

I am thinking of Pelikan 4001 Violet, which I used for decades, in wet pens and dry ones.  It is considered a dry ink, but it doesn't feel dry when one writes with it, and it produces a legible line even in a Japanese extra fine nib.

 

A dry ink that is low in saturation can produce a depressingly dim line in a dry pen.  One that is low in lubrication can cause a nib to feel as if it were dragging across the page. 



#5 corniche

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 04:50

A dry ink that is vivid and well lubricated can provide a satisfying experience even in a relatively dry pen.
 
I am thinking of Pelikan 4001 Violet, which I used for decades, in wet pens and dry ones.  It is considered a dry ink, but it doesn't feel dry when one writes with it, and it produces a legible line even in a Japanese extra fine nib.
 
A dry ink that is low in saturation can produce a depressingly dim line in a dry pen.  One that is low in lubrication can cause a nib to feel as if it were dragging across the page. 


👍

Pelikan Turquoise and Dark Green are both slow-flow inks that do not feel sandy/gritty, either.

Sean :)
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#6 penzel_washinkton

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 14:55

You will get a fast drying pen+ink combination.

Personally I don't fancy it when I can't see an ink glistening for quite a while on a piece of paper.



#7 Tseg

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 21:33

The worst is when one gets a dry pen and the perfect color ink is also dry... I recently got a Diplomat Excellence A2 Marrakesh (red/gold/brown) and the ideal ink color is Waterman Absolute Brown.  That ink has few reviews, but most suggesting it is average to above average wetness.  Not my experience. The pen just felt like nails on a chalkboard at all times with this ink, and a very thin/unsaturated, quick-drying result.  I threw in some Sailor green/brown ink I had (Rikyu-Cha) and it feels like a different pen completely... beautiful, smooth. wet, luscious writer.  



#8 A Smug Dill

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 06:26

The worst is when one gets a dry pen and the perfect color ink is also dry... I recently got a Diplomat Excellence A2 Marrakesh (red/gold/brown) and the ideal ink color is Waterman Absolute Brown.

 

 

You could always attempt to make the pen write wetter by adjusting the tine gap or widening the channel on the feed, if the ink is "ideal" but the pen won't play along with the "dream team" combination.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.

#9 Tseg

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 09:14

 

 

You could always attempt to make the pen write wetter by adjusting the tine gap or widening the channel on the feed, if the ink is "ideal" but the pen won't play along with the "dream team" combination.

 

Yes, tried that, to the point of pulling the nib, adjusting tines by hand and with shims, took a scalpel to the feed... nothing worked with that ink.  But Sailor inks work like a dream in that pen.  
 

I do use the Waterman brown in a late 1950’s Geha 970 with flex nib and it works amazingly.








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