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Help With P51 Nib Please


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6 replies to this topic

#1 OCArt

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 04:55

I have a Parker 51 gold stub nib whose previous owner took a knife to the slit and opened it too far. Now the capillary action isn't consistent.  I have the nib off the pen and can get the tips somewhat together but the slit is still too wide at the middle of the nib.  Gentle pressure on the sides mid-length along the tubular nib isn't doing anything.  I thought I'd better stop and get some professional advice.

 

Thanks


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#2 corniche

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 05:25

Hi OCArt,

Have you tried to place the nib on it's back on a firm surface and then gently apply even, (use a hc book), downward pressure?

Sean :)
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#3 OCArt

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 17:45

I wasn't sure which direction to go in, whether to flatten or increase the curve of the tubular nib?

Hi OCArt,

Have you tried to place the nib on it's back on a firm surface and then gently apply even, (use a hc book), downward pressure?

Sean :)


----------------

"Pens a'plenty in 2020" Chuck Montano from The Nib Section podcast


#4 corniche

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    The situation is hopeless, but not serious.

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 18:35

I wasn't sure which direction to go in, whether to flatten or increase the curve of the tubular nib?


Hi OCArt,

Yeah, well, if common sense counts for anything; increasing the curve would bring the tines together. My advice was geared more with a conventional nib in mind. :rolleyes:

I have the Dubeil book and the latest edition of the Oldfield book, let me check them and get back to you later... or maybe someone else will chime in the meantime.

Laying the nib on its SIDE and applying gentle, even downward pressure may be the ticket in case. :unsure:


Sean :)
"Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." - Albert Einstein

CatholicsComeHome

#5 OCArt

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 00:52

Thank you very much, corniche.  I appreciate your input.

Hi OCArt,

Yeah, well, if common sense counts for anything; increasing the curve would bring the tines together. My advice was geared more with a conventional nib in mind. :rolleyes:

I have the Dubeil book and the latest edition of the Oldfield book, let me check them and get back to you later... or maybe someone else will chime in the meantime.

Laying the nib on its SIDE and applying gentle, even downward pressure may be the ticket in case. :unsure:


Sean :)


----------------

"Pens a'plenty in 2020" Chuck Montano from The Nib Section podcast


#6 corniche

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 03:01

Thank you very much, corniche.  I appreciate your input.


Hi OCArt,

You're more than welcome. It's been a hectic day, but I plan to check the books tonight and see what I can find out. :)

Sean :)
"Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." - Albert Einstein

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#7 corniche

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Posted 02 March 2020 - 12:36

Hi OCArt,

Sorry it took so long to get back to you, but I think your best bet is to use a pair of parallel pliers with cushioned jaws and very gently press the split tines closer together to reduce the flow.

Sean :)
"Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." - Albert Einstein

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