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Your Favourite Steel Nib

steel nib

64 replies to this topic

#61 MuddyWaters

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 03:58

Delike New Moon fine with a slight upturn.  Writes better than many of my pens at 10X the cost.


Agreed, excellent nibs. I don't just them simply because they are short and lead to my hand feeling cramped

Link to a post about ergonomics I made: http://www.fountainp...with/?p=4179072


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#62 EDC

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Posted 25 February 2020 - 07:50

The Moonman #6 nib has raised the bar for Chinese nibs IMHO.  I haven't run into a bad one yet. Still just in a single (F/M) width so a ways to go yet.



#63 EDC

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 15:42

I'll give it a third vote. Even my old 2668 is a very smooth writer.  Check with Gary Weimer onthis forume; he may have a 9668 attached to a restored Esterbrook pen.

The Smithsonian just made a trove of images available online. So naturally I searched for fountain pens. Just one but interesting.

 

An Esterbrook desk pen used by Johnson to sign the voting rights act. With a 2668 nib.

 



#64 sandy101

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 09:07

The nib on my Diplomat Excellence A is my favourite steel nib.

 

It is firm. It writes incredibly well, and seems to take all the inks I can throw at it.



#65 A Smug Dill

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Posted 01 March 2020 - 04:20

I don't have a single favourite steel nib, among easily a dozen or more excellent and enjoyable (for different reasons and/or use case, perhaps) steel nibs I have out of over a hundred steel-nibbed pens in my fleet. Even if I did have one favourite, it would be because that particular instance of it writes somehow differently from others of the same make, model and (nominal) nib width grade or type. One of my Pelikan M200 F nibs is delightful to me and stand above others of the same specification precisely because it is different from its siblings. One of my steel-Medium-nibbed Rotring Initial fountain pens write better than two others who are supposed to be identical to it except for barrel colour. Discussing my favourite nib, if there was one, as a particular instance of a class or subclass of objects does not mean anyone else can get the same by ordering a new one of the same description; if I was to order another pen of that make and model myself, chances are the new pen would not have a nib that is equally as good.

 

If the intent is to discuss categorically good steel nibs by make and model, as if there would be negligible variation between individual units, so that someone else could try to procure one that replicates the quality and/or experience of what is described, I'd probably start with:


  • Platinum #3776 steel F nib on the PTB-500B, if one enjoys Platinum #3776 14K gold F nibs — such as on the Bourgogne, Black Diamond, and kanazawa-haku models — due the characteristics (such as stiffness and kinaesthetic feedback) of "typical" Platinum nibs

  • Sailor 1911 steel F nibs on the Procolor product line of pens, if one enjoys using the 14K gold F nibs on the Sailor Profit Standard and Professional Gear Slim pens due the characteristics of "typical" medium-sized (in the manufacturer's nomenclature) Sailor nibs


precisely those brands are quite consistent in its manufacture and quality of products of the same design, even though there is a marked price difference on account of the materials used.

 

I also happen to really enjoy using Daiso-Hauser fountain pens on account of their nibs, in spite of the pens (and even the nibs) because cheaply constructed and the shortcomings show at every turn. Even so, I wouldn't say any particular unit of those is (or has been fitted with) my "favourite steel nib" on a fountain pen.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.




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