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Which Would You Get? Used M120 Green Black Or Restored 140


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23 replies to this topic

#1 85AKbN

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 11:28

If you are interested in this style of Pelikan fountain pen (school pens), which would you get?

 

- used M120 Green Black - from overseas, around $133 (before shipping?)

 

- restored 140 from the 1950s (The Penguin)



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#2 joss

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 11:37

Without any doubt the 140, especially if it comes from the Penguin.

 

The 140 was the entry level 1950s Pelikan quality pen: it shares design features with the 120 but it was was definitely not a school pen.



#3 carlos.q

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 11:54

Without any doubt the 140, especially if it comes from the Penguin.

 

 

+1

 

Also, the 140 has a gold nib while the 120 has a steel nib. 



#4 sargetalon

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 13:47

Both are great pens. The writing experience of the 140 is likely to be more enjoyable so that is the direction I would lean.

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#5 85AKbN

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 13:50

Yup - that's the way I was leaning  -  the 140. My paypal balance is burning a hole in my pocket. Thanks for respsonding everyone.


Edited by 85AKbN, 01 February 2020 - 13:51.


#6 sansenri

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 17:14

From a form factor point of view the two pens are identical.

But as mentioned, the 140 has a gold nib (which today if bough alone can easily add another $100 to the cost) and the binde of the 140 is cellulose acetate. So the 140 is the upgraded version of the 120, and a more elegant pen.

At $133 the 120 is a bit costly, unless it's in used but absolutely close to mint conditions.

You do not mention the cost of the 140. There were quite a few of these pens made so pricing might not be dramatically higher (considering the gold nib).

They are both great pens though, and in view of the different nibs they are also rather different in the writing experience.

I own both. The 120 holds a place in my heart since it was my first FP.



#7 ENewton

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 17:41

The 140 is a nice little pen, but it took me more than a year to find an ink that would work well in mine.

 

My other vintage pens are Parkers and Watermans.  Relative to those, the 140 has more feedback and benefits from a more lubricated ink. 

 

Also, whereas 140s with broader nibs can run quite wet (from what I have read on this forum), those with narrower nibs can write dry enough to demand darker, wetter, or more saturated inks.  I prefer muted colors  to bright ones and enjoy shading, but none of my lower chroma inks provides satisfying results in my 140. 

 

Finally, according to Rick Propas, one should not expect a Pelikan 140 to provide obvious line variation under normal writing pressure.  Rick explained to me that the pen was designed to allow a person to use it for utilitarian writing all day long.  Then if, in the evening, one wanted to write a personal letter and add flair to a capital, for example, one could do so by exerting pressure on the nib.  He showed me how much pressure, and it was not a relaxed stroke.  

 

After quite a bit of trial and error, I now use Iroshizuku ink in my 140.  It provides enough flow to produce a legible line, with shading on some papers, while being lubricated enough to provide a pleasant writing experience.



#8 85AKbN

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 20:59

I had a Rick Propas restored 140 and sold it a while back, so I know it's writing and ink characteristics.  Just sent him an email to see if he has an EF.

 

I have something that might work...

 

t4O8VFg.jpg


Edited by 85AKbN, 01 February 2020 - 21:01.


#9 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 02:23

I would choose the 140. I bought mine from Rick Propas in August 2017 and it has been inked continuously ever since. Primarily Pelikan 4001 Blue Black. It has been an absolute joy to use.

Brad
 
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#10 WLSpec

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 02:40

I would choose the 140. I bought mine from Rick Propas in August 2017 and it has been inked continuously ever since. Primarily Pelikan 4001 Blue Black. It has been an absolute joy to use.

140



#11 SchaumburgSwan

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 03:12

Hi,

 

go for the 140. I have a green one with a stunning OB stub nib.

It is so much fun to write, feeling, line variation and some flex.

A great nib! And I have some of the best english nibs to compare...

 

Best

Jens


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#12 85AKbN

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 09:56

Rick said he has a few 140s with an EF nib. Said he's leaving the the LA pen show Wednesday.

 

2-3-20 edit: Pelikan 140 ordered.


Edited by 85AKbN, 04 February 2020 - 05:13.


#13 david3000

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 20:33

Will the 140 accept a modern M400 nib?

#14 85AKbN

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 10:42

Will the 140 accept a modern M400 nib?

 

Ask Rick - The Penguin.



#15 Parker51

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 14:41

The 140 you get from Rick should not be unscrewed, per Rick. Instead, the nib can be pulled and replaced with a comparable nib. Yes, it was designed to be unscrewed, but that can lead to unneeded pressure on some very old parts, which in turn can lead to breakage. The one I purchased from him was the 140 I wanted with the nib I wanted, which he simply switched from one to another by almost effortlessly pulling the nibs.

#16 85AKbN

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 07:20

Good to know Parker51 - thanks!  I got Rick to pick me out an EF nib, which I plan on sticking with.



#17 Parker51

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 14:37

I am not switching nibs either. I made my purchase at the Ohio Pen show.

#18 Ray-Vigo

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 15:19

Of those two, the 140 is the better option.

 

That quoted price for a 120 is high. Also bear in mind that you have the original 120 (Pelikan) the second series 120 (Merz & Krell) and then there's the modern reproduction 120 (new Pelikan). The price quoted is high even for an original Pelikan 120, way high for Merz & Krell, and still a bit high for a used reproduction.

 

The 120 as a student level (albeit a very good student level) pen still turns up sometimes at antique shops and similar for much less than that. I got one from an antique shop recently that came with its box and instructions for well under $100 within the past month. So those are still out there.


Edited by Ray-Vigo, 06 February 2020 - 15:22.


#19 85AKbN

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:14

RLG9FYX.jpg



#20 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 21:24

I have both. Get the 140....it is semi-flex, the 120 is 'only' regular flex***. The 140 is stubbed, the 120 has a tad of stubbishness, not much....more like a small flat spot on an American Bump Under nib.

The medium-short 140 was a very popular size pen back in the '50-60's. Geha's flagship the 760 was medium large, Kawaco and Osmia made one also.

The 140 when posted is the same size as the standard sized 400............the Geha 760 don't have the extra long cap of the 140, so is not as long as the posted 140.

The nib of the 140 is a bit smaller than the 120/400....will fit either but looks a tad dorky on a 400/120.

 

***I do like regular flex....but as mentioned $130 is very, very high........

 

If you want a school pen, a Geha School pen that is = or better than the 120; can be had from E12-19 on German Ebay.....if you take your time and HUNT...........if you can keep out of the hands of the German Pen seller Cartel who offer high starting stateside prices on a bid pen, so you spend E10 more for a buy now idiot pen. I've seen Geha school pens offered for only $89 in the states.

I have two Geha school pens.......highly recommend them as great nice springy regular flex pens.....best buy in that class.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 







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