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Mr. Krinke's Esterbrook


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Estycollector

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 11:18

I was reading an interview after Mr. Krinke passed and was surprised to read that he had a favorite pen that was an Esterbrook. With so many with which to choose, he preferred an Esterbrook. 

 

"Though he was fond of the bright, dazzling pens that were in vogue during the Roaring ‘20s, Krinke’s weapon of choice was a more sturdy pen made decades later.

“I wouldn’t trade this pen for love or money,” he told The Times in 1998, grinning as he held the 1950 Esterbrook skyward. “It’s not for sale.”

 

https://twnews.us/us...-pen-dies-at-91


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#2 Pickwick

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 02:53

Most of his generation were never pen collectors, if a pen was proving to be a reliable writer it would only be replaced if lost or failing. Esterbrook, which was an inexpensive pen has proved its worth in being still available in prolific numbers even now! 


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The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#3 Estycollector

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 10:32

Most of his generation were never pen collectors, if a pen was proving to be a reliable writer it would only be replaced if lost or failing. Esterbrook, which was an inexpensive pen has proved its worth in being still available in prolific numbers even now! 

 

He would have had access to the vintage pens many collectors think now were the best writers and designs of all time. I would be less surprised that his favorite was a Parker 51. I'd like to know what it was about his Easterbrook that made it his favorite. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#4 Pickwick

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 17:12

 

He would have had access to the vintage pens many collectors think now were the best writers and designs of all time. I would be less surprised that his favorite was a Parker 51. I'd like to know what it was about his Easterbrook that made it his favorite. 

 

 

My generation saw the launching of the Parker 51, although its design was unique, it was considered an expensive luxury. therefore would probably be offered for a seasonal gift or award for some achievement. Like ballpoints, fountain pens in my day was a useful portable writing instrument. An Esterbrook, if lost or damaged was a cheap pen to replace.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#5 Estycollector

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 17:51

 
 
My generation saw the launching of the Parker 51, although its design was unique, it was considered an expensive luxury. therefore would probably be offered for a seasonal gift or award for some achievement. Like ballpoints, fountain pens in my day was a useful portable writing instrument. An Esterbrook, if lost or damaged was a cheap pen to replace.


Yes, I do appreciate your point of economics. That said, a shop owner would have an advantage and availability for pens that the general customer would not.

"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#6 Pickwick

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 18:34

Yes, I do appreciate your point of economics. That said, a shop owner would have an advantage and availability for pens that the general customer would not.

Well that may well have been the fact. However, he decided to remain loyal to his his Esterbrook.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
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Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#7 Estycollector

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 20:31

Well that may well have been the fact. However, he decided to remain loyal to his his Esterbrook.


Exactly:)

"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#8 Hobiwan

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 10:18

In his 60-year(?) career as a pen seller/repairman, I'd say Fred laid hands on every brand and style of quality pen made.  He once said that no matter how pretty or expensive, the business end of any pen is where it applies ink to paper; which is probably why his go-to pen was the Esterbrook. 

 

He knew it would always be there when needed ...

 

Just as he was.


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#9 Estycollector

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 10:38

In his 60-year(?) career as a pen seller/repairman, I'd say Fred laid hands on every brand and style of quality pen made.  He once said that no matter how pretty or expensive, the business end of any pen is where it applies ink to paper; which is probably why his go-to pen was the Esterbrook. 

 

He knew it would always be there when needed ...

 

Just as he was.

 

Thank you for that account of Mr. Krinke. It is true that Esterbrook's focus was on "where it applies ink to paper". 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#10 AAAndrew

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 02:41

For Esterbrook, it was always about the nib. 



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#11 CraigR

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:02

Fred Krinke and the Fountain Pen Shop were American originals. What a fun place to spend an afternoon. A combination of museum and factory repair shop. Fred repaired a number of my pens over the years and rummaged in the back of the shop until he found just the elusive pen part that I needed. I lived an hour, or three depending on traffic, from the shop so it was a treat for me to visit and then be able to hang out in the shop for as long as possible. The conversations that I overheard provided a nice education on all things fountain pen. Fred was particularly helpful when the store was less busy, taking the time to explain characteristics for various vintage pens, filling systems, and nib choices. I enjoyed and appreciated the entire experience.

 

To the point of the original post, Fred was instrumental in getting me hooked on collecting Esterbrooks. With his advice, along with encouragement from several FPNers, I ended up with a sizable assortment of Esties, all usable and in excellent condition. He often told me about his preference for the pens and my memory is that he mainly liked their dependability, ease of servicing, interchangeable nibs, and affordability. As others have mentioned, it was that the pen wrote when the nib touched paper and it wrote well. All that you can ask of a pen.

 

I moved from California in 2013, started full-time RVing, and sold most of my pen collection due to lack of space to store them on the road. I kept a few of the Esties and they are still my favorite writers.


A consumer and purveyor of words. 

 

Co-editor and writer for Faith On Every Corner Magazine

Magazine - http://www.faithonev...m/magazine.html

 

 

 


#12 Estycollector

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 10:52

Fred Krinke and the Fountain Pen Shop were American originals. What a fun place to spend an afternoon. A combination of museum and factory repair shop. Fred repaired a number of my pens over the years and rummaged in the back of the shop until he found just the elusive pen part that I needed. I lived an hour, or three depending on traffic, from the shop so it was a treat for me to visit and then be able to hang out in the shop for as long as possible. The conversations that I overheard provided a nice education on all things fountain pen. Fred was particularly helpful when the store was less busy, taking the time to explain characteristics for various vintage pens, filling systems, and nib choices. I enjoyed and appreciated the entire experience.

 

To the point of the original post, Fred was instrumental in getting me hooked on collecting Esterbrooks. With his advice, along with encouragement from several FPNers, I ended up with a sizable assortment of Esties, all usable and in excellent condition. He often told me about his preference for the pens and my memory is that he mainly liked their dependability, ease of servicing, interchangeable nibs, and affordability. As others have mentioned, it was that the pen wrote when the nib touched paper and it wrote well. All that you can ask of a pen.

 

I moved from California in 2013, started full-time RVing, and sold most of my pen collection due to lack of space to store them on the road. I kept a few of the Esties and they are still my favorite writers.

 

Dear Craig,

 

Thank you for being a primary source for information on Mr. Krinke. I have a very small collection and have given away several restored Esterbrook pens to friends and family.

 

I've enjoyed experiencing the various nibs and actually enjoy the less expensive 2556. I have a couple black plastic "dollar" pens and a blue demi dollar with later plastic. I found two of the early friction fit deluxe, a transitional J, and a full size J. Interestingly, while I do not have small hands, the SJ's are my favorite for daily use. I've also been able to find a SJ mechanical pencil to match one of the FP's. 

 

Right now I am using the Waterman brand ink. 


"Respect science, respect nature, respect all people (s),"


#13 CraigR

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 16:30

 

Dear Craig,

 

Thank you for being a primary source for information on Mr. Krinke. I have a very small collection and have given away several restored Esterbrook pens to friends and family.

 

I've enjoyed experiencing the various nibs and actually enjoy the less expensive 2556. I have a couple black plastic "dollar" pens and a blue demi dollar with later plastic. I found two of the early friction fit deluxe, a transitional J, and a full size J. Interestingly, while I do not have small hands, the SJ's are my favorite for daily use. I've also been able to find a SJ mechanical pencil to match one of the FP's. 

 

Right now I am using the Waterman brand ink. 

Glad that you are having fun with your pens and inks! Waterman inks have been favorites of mine for years. I loved the old Florida Blue and still have several unopened bottles.


A consumer and purveyor of words. 

 

Co-editor and writer for Faith On Every Corner Magazine

Magazine - http://www.faithonev...m/magazine.html

 

 

 







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