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Make Sailor Wetter And Not Broader

sailor feed

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#1 The-Thinker

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 00:42

I am new to this forum and network, i was wondering if there is a way to make a sailor write as wet as western writers like pelikans, without changing the line width 



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#2 Paul-in-SF

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 23:28

I shouldn't be the first one to answer, as I am far from an expert. But I will say that I believe there are things an expert nibmeister could do that would meet your requirements. This is a service for which they will, or course, charge you. If you have the chance to go to a pen show you would probably find several nibmeisters there, or you can contact them by email. 

 

If you are fortunate enough, as I am, to have a local pen club where you are (Lebanon, is it?) you might find someone there who would be able to help you, either by doing it themselves or by suggesting someone. 

 

By the way, if you're thinking of nib grinding, I don't think that is what they would do for this. You can't grind a nib to be wider, you can only grind it to be narrower (if I understand correctly). What they would likely do would probably involve manipulating the nib tines and possibly the feed to allow ink to run through faster. You can achieve this effect partially by using a wetter ink, or adding an ink lubricant to your ink. I don't think it will make as much difference to the writing as having an expert work on your nib, though. 

 

Best of luck.


Edited by Paul-in-SF, 17 January 2020 - 23:38.


#3 markh

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 01:08

I adjust, grind, and reshape my own nibs, but no one else's, so take that into account. Also - there is a learning curve, anything I state could damage your pen, so be warned. And finally, there is no correct answer - the way your pen writes is a matter of taste. I prefer fine-xfine high flow nibs.

Tools: a variety of fine abrasives, a good 10x loupe, and good lighting.

 

There are several ways of increasing the flow of your pen. The first thing to note is that if you increase the flow without changing anything else, the line will be at least somewhat wider, as more ink is flowing.

 

The flow is controlled by a few things. Spreading the tines further apart. The distance of the nib from the feed. The texture of the inside surface of the nib. The texture of the writing tip. TINY changes in the spacing or texture make a great deal of difference.

 

1. The first thing to always try is a different ink. You (OK - I) would be surprised by how much difference this can make in how the pen lays ink down. Requires no adjustment, bending, grinding, or anything else.

Along with this, I always adjust nibs with the exact same ink,on the exact same paper. In my case I use Quink Black and a cheap paper I have found at Daiso. Adjusting a pen filled with double dense Noodlers on Rhodia paper tells me nothing about how the pen is performing. Nothing wrong with either of them, but I feel the results end up skewed.

 

2. You can increase the gap between the tines by spreading the tines (bending metal). I sometimes use a thin brass sheet to help this, carefully avoiding splaying the end of the tines. But mostly the tool of choice is fingernails.

This will also broaden the nib. But the gap doesn't need to be spread much, so the trade off might work for what you are looking for. I have also used  fine mylar abrasive to remove material between the tines.  I know that this is a permanent change, but again the difference is so tiny that I frequently think this is the best choice (for me).

 

2. If you bend the metal to spread the tines, this will usually also bend the nib away from the feed. The result might be what you like. You can also heat set the nib a little further from the nib, increasing the flow without spreading tines. This requires practice - too much and flow will stop. Also requires practice as to the heat. Sailors use plastic feeds, so the heat source I use is water a little below boiling point. On ebonite feeds I use a heat gun where I have used it enough to have a good idea of what heat setting. The heat gun will damage the plastic feed. Practice, practice, practice....

 

3. Metal surfaces that are too smooth can have a higher surface tension, and not flow as well. In some cases I have slightly roughened the contact point - think 6000 micro mesh, then smooth back with 12,000 or even some finer abrasives (mylar lapping sheets 0.5micron, for example). A slight texturing will increase ink flow. Too much and the nib will feel draggy, but the increased flow can reduce this feeling. You are trading off one effect for another.

 

4. The same effect can happen on the inside surface of the nib. I sometimes pull the nib out and scuff the inside surface (not the tip) in lines along the direction of the nib. I'm sometimes surprised by how poorly the plating was done where you can't see it, but this helps whether the plating was perfect or not. I've talked to at least one other pro repair person who does this. This can increase flow with no change in any other dimensions, but of course you need to feel comfortable in pulling the nib and feed.

 

I guess I'm super picky, and end up doing some amount of adjustment on just about every pen I get, which I must admit is a lot. It's pretty rare to cause an un-recoverable screw up these days, but no so a few years ago.

 

We live in the golden age of self pen adjustment, since you can buy a replacement steel nib and feed for not that much and even total destruction isn't that much money. Alas - the same isn't true for your Sailor. The adjustments are no different any any other modern pen, but as far as I know if you mess up there is no way back except sending it in for repair. Making this not the pen to start with - sort of depends on how brave you are.

 

If this is the first pen you have tuned/adjusted, getting it to an expert is probably a good idea. If you can get to a pen show and have them do it while you watch, you can ask a few questions and learn.

 

.

 

 

 


"The objective in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane" - - Marcus Aurelius Antoninus .

#4 japinder_888

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:55

Hi

 

I want to grind my Jinhao Medium nibs to stubs/CI. I have read many articles on grinding but exactly don't know about the size of abrasive materials to start with.

 

Could you please inform us about materials for grinding, polishing and then fine tuning.

 

Thanks in advance.  

I adjust, grind, and reshape my own nibs, but no one else's, so take that into account. Also - there is a learning curve, anything I state could damage your pen, so be warned. And finally, there is no correct answer - the way your pen writes is a matter of taste. I prefer fine-xfine high flow nibs.

Tools: a variety of fine abrasives, a good 10x loupe, and good lighting.

 

There are several ways of increasing the flow of your pen. The first thing to note is that if you increase the flow without changing anything else, the line will be at least somewhat wider, as more ink is flowing.

 

The flow is controlled by a few things. Spreading the tines further apart. The distance of the nib from the feed. The texture of the inside surface of the nib. The texture of the writing tip. TINY changes in the spacing or texture make a great deal of difference.

 

1. The first thing to always try is a different ink. You (OK - I) would be surprised by how much difference this can make in how the pen lays ink down. Requires no adjustment, bending, grinding, or anything else.

Along with this, I always adjust nibs with the exact same ink,on the exact same paper. In my case I use Quink Black and a cheap paper I have found at Daiso. Adjusting a pen filled with double dense Noodlers on Rhodia paper tells me nothing about how the pen is performing. Nothing wrong with either of them, but I feel the results end up skewed.

 

2. You can increase the gap between the tines by spreading the tines (bending metal). I sometimes use a thin brass sheet to help this, carefully avoiding splaying the end of the tines. But mostly the tool of choice is fingernails.

This will also broaden the nib. But the gap doesn't need to be spread much, so the trade off might work for what you are looking for. I have also used  fine mylar abrasive to remove material between the tines.  I know that this is a permanent change, but again the difference is so tiny that I frequently think this is the best choice (for me).

 

2. If you bend the metal to spread the tines, this will usually also bend the nib away from the feed. The result might be what you like. You can also heat set the nib a little further from the nib, increasing the flow without spreading tines. This requires practice - too much and flow will stop. Also requires practice as to the heat. Sailors use plastic feeds, so the heat source I use is water a little below boiling point. On ebonite feeds I use a heat gun where I have used it enough to have a good idea of what heat setting. The heat gun will damage the plastic feed. Practice, practice, practice....

 

3. Metal surfaces that are too smooth can have a higher surface tension, and not flow as well. In some cases I have slightly roughened the contact point - think 6000 micro mesh, then smooth back with 12,000 or even some finer abrasives (mylar lapping sheets 0.5micron, for example). A slight texturing will increase ink flow. Too much and the nib will feel draggy, but the increased flow can reduce this feeling. You are trading off one effect for another.

 

4. The same effect can happen on the inside surface of the nib. I sometimes pull the nib out and scuff the inside surface (not the tip) in lines along the direction of the nib. I'm sometimes surprised by how poorly the plating was done where you can't see it, but this helps whether the plating was perfect or not. I've talked to at least one other pro repair person who does this. This can increase flow with no change in any other dimensions, but of course you need to feel comfortable in pulling the nib and feed.

 

I guess I'm super picky, and end up doing some amount of adjustment on just about every pen I get, which I must admit is a lot. It's pretty rare to cause an un-recoverable screw up these days, but no so a few years ago.

 

We live in the golden age of self pen adjustment, since you can buy a replacement steel nib and feed for not that much and even total destruction isn't that much money. Alas - the same isn't true for your Sailor. The adjustments are no different any any other modern pen, but as far as I know if you mess up there is no way back except sending it in for repair. Making this not the pen to start with - sort of depends on how brave you are.

 

If this is the first pen you have tuned/adjusted, getting it to an expert is probably a good idea. If you can get to a pen show and have them do it while you watch, you can ask a few questions and learn.

 

.

 

 

 

 

I adjust, grind, and reshape my own nibs, but no one else's, so take that into account. Also - there is a learning curve, anything I state could damage your pen, so be warned. And finally, there is no correct answer - the way your pen writes is a matter of taste. I prefer fine-xfine high flow nibs.

Tools: a variety of fine abrasives, a good 10x loupe, and good lighting.

 

There are several ways of increasing the flow of your pen. The first thing to note is that if you increase the flow without changing anything else, the line will be at least somewhat wider, as more ink is flowing.

 

The flow is controlled by a few things. Spreading the tines further apart. The distance of the nib from the feed. The texture of the inside surface of the nib. The texture of the writing tip. TINY changes in the spacing or texture make a great deal of difference.

 

1. The first thing to always try is a different ink. You (OK - I) would be surprised by how much difference this can make in how the pen lays ink down. Requires no adjustment, bending, grinding, or anything else.

Along with this, I always adjust nibs with the exact same ink,on the exact same paper. In my case I use Quink Black and a cheap paper I have found at Daiso. Adjusting a pen filled with double dense Noodlers on Rhodia paper tells me nothing about how the pen is performing. Nothing wrong with either of them, but I feel the results end up skewed.

 

2. You can increase the gap between the tines by spreading the tines (bending metal). I sometimes use a thin brass sheet to help this, carefully avoiding splaying the end of the tines. But mostly the tool of choice is fingernails.

This will also broaden the nib. But the gap doesn't need to be spread much, so the trade off might work for what you are looking for. I have also used  fine mylar abrasive to remove material between the tines.  I know that this is a permanent change, but again the difference is so tiny that I frequently think this is the best choice (for me).

 

2. If you bend the metal to spread the tines, this will usually also bend the nib away from the feed. The result might be what you like. You can also heat set the nib a little further from the nib, increasing the flow without spreading tines. This requires practice - too much and flow will stop. Also requires practice as to the heat. Sailors use plastic feeds, so the heat source I use is water a little below boiling point. On ebonite feeds I use a heat gun where I have used it enough to have a good idea of what heat setting. The heat gun will damage the plastic feed. Practice, practice, practice....

 

3. Metal surfaces that are too smooth can have a higher surface tension, and not flow as well. In some cases I have slightly roughened the contact point - think 6000 micro mesh, then smooth back with 12,000 or even some finer abrasives (mylar lapping sheets 0.5micron, for example). A slight texturing will increase ink flow. Too much and the nib will feel draggy, but the increased flow can reduce this feeling. You are trading off one effect for another.

 

4. The same effect can happen on the inside surface of the nib. I sometimes pull the nib out and scuff the inside surface (not the tip) in lines along the direction of the nib. I'm sometimes surprised by how poorly the plating was done where you can't see it, but this helps whether the plating was perfect or not. I've talked to at least one other pro repair person who does this. This can increase flow with no change in any other dimensions, but of course you need to feel comfortable in pulling the nib and feed.

 

I guess I'm super picky, and end up doing some amount of adjustment on just about every pen I get, which I must admit is a lot. It's pretty rare to cause an un-recoverable screw up these days, but no so a few years ago.

 

We live in the golden age of self pen adjustment, since you can buy a replacement steel nib and feed for not that much and even total destruction isn't that much money. Alas - the same isn't true for your Sailor. The adjustments are no different any any other modern pen, but as far as I know if you mess up there is no way back except sending it in for repair. Making this not the pen to start with - sort of depends on how brave you are.

 

If this is the first pen you have tuned/adjusted, getting it to an expert is probably a good idea. If you can get to a pen show and have them do it while you watch, you can ask a few questions and learn.

 

.

 

 

 



#5 alexwi

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 23:52

Hi

 

I want to grind my Jinhao Medium nibs to stubs/CI. I have read many articles on grinding but exactly don't know about the size of abrasive materials to start with.

 

Could you please inform us about materials for grinding, polishing and then fine tuning.

 

Thanks in advance.  

 

 

For the one nib that I did grind, I used a knife sharpener to do the grinding and then polished with micromesh pads.

 

Worked like a charm, but be sure to use a very light hand for the grind and check your work CONSTANTLY (i.e. after every 2 strokes or so) while grinding.

 

You can read about my adventure here: http://www.fountainp...ind-and-rescue/

 

alex


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#6 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 19:39

 

For the one nib that I did grind, I used a knife sharpener to do the grinding and then polished with micromesh pads.

Are you talking something like a flat Arkansas/Washita stone, or something more like the WorkSharp https://www.amazon.c...620&s=hi&sr=1-4

 

It does have some fairly fine belts available (and I think there is even a set of belts that fit it meant for sharpening ceramic blades, and may be even finer grit -- finest standard is a 1/2x12" 6000 MicroMesh



#7 alexwi

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 21:47

Are you talking something like a flat Arkansas/Washita stone, or something more like the WorkSharp https://www.amazon.c...620&s=hi&sr=1-4

 

It does have some fairly fine belts available (and I think there is even a set of belts that fit it meant for sharpening ceramic blades, and may be even finer grit -- finest standard is a 1/2x12" 6000 MicroMesh

 

LOL! No! I was referring to a stone or stone-like gadget. This is the one I used: post-143115-0-08121200-1532053127.jpg

 

I used the Fine side, which is 750 grit and could see quite a difference in the nib's shape from one stroke to the next, despite using a very soft hand (the coarse side is 325 grit).

 

Nibmeisters use dremels and other machines, but the risk of a beginner ruining a nib is just too high to start there.


Edited by alexwi, 20 January 2020 - 21:49.

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#8 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 19:04

Ah... a diamond "stone". Nice feature of that model is that they have that patch without the holes, usable for more delicate articles that could snag on the plastic.

 

I have an older DMT Diafold Red/Green ( https://www.dmtsharp...-sided-diafold/ ) (600/1200 mesh https://www.dmtsharp...hart/?ajax=true ) {"older" as mine has handle halves that match the red and green layers, not the clear shown on the web site}.

 

If it weren't for the lack of a continuous patch, the Green/Tan (1200/8000 mesh) model might be recommended.

 

I also do have the aforementioned WorkSharp unit (with the optional blade grinding attachment), and very small Buck Washita (4.25x1.75x0.5") and Hard Arkansas (2.75x1.0x0.25") stones from the early 80s, and a Smiths double-side combo Fine/Medium (8.0x2.0x0.5") from the late 90s (unfortunately, I don't recall if the mottled grey or the off-white is the Fine -- and Smith's web site no longer offers it in natural stone, just man-made).

 

I suppose the Buck Arkansas is about the right size for nibs, and is the "finishing" stone of the set. Don't think I'd ever risk the WorkSharp, even on slowest speed with the 6000 grit belt :wacko:


Edited by BaronWulfraed, 21 January 2020 - 19:07.


#9 Bibliophage

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 19:25

As I recall, mottled grey tended to be medium or coarse, and the white-ish is the fine.  You can usually tell by running your finger down the side.



#10 The-Thinker

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 01:39

I shouldn't be the first one to answer, as I am far from an expert. But I will say that I believe there are things an expert nibmeister could do that would meet your requirements. This is a service for which they will, or course, charge you. If you have the chance to go to a pen show you would probably find several nibmeisters there, or you can contact them by email. 

 

If you are fortunate enough, as I am, to have a local pen club where you are (Lebanon, is it?) you might find someone there who would be able to help you, either by doing it themselves or by suggesting someone. 

 

By the way, if you're thinking of nib grinding, I don't think that is what they would do for this. You can't grind a nib to be wider, you can only grind it to be narrower (if I understand correctly). What they would likely do would probably involve manipulating the nib tines and possibly the feed to allow ink to run through faster. You can achieve this effect partially by using a wetter ink, or adding an ink lubricant to your ink. I don't think it will make as much difference to the writing as having an expert work on your nib, though. 

 

Best of luck.

 

Unfortunately i have no one over here to tune nibs and whatnot :( Lebanon is one of the countries that the fountain pen culture is not developed, so most of the nib tunings should be done by myself. But if there are any special cases for expensive pens i could consider sending it to a nibmeister, but the sailor that i have is not worth the hassle + there are other sailors that i want to make wetter as well !



#11 The-Thinker

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 01:45

I adjust, grind, and reshape my own nibs, but no one else's, so take that into account. Also - there is a learning curve, anything I state could damage your pen, so be warned. And finally, there is no correct answer - the way your pen writes is a matter of taste. I prefer fine-xfine high flow nibs.

Tools: a variety of fine abrasives, a good 10x loupe, and good lighting.

 

There are several ways of increasing the flow of your pen. The first thing to note is that if you increase the flow without changing anything else, the line will be at least somewhat wider, as more ink is flowing.

 

The flow is controlled by a few things. Spreading the tines further apart. The distance of the nib from the feed. The texture of the inside surface of the nib. The texture of the writing tip. TINY changes in the spacing or texture make a great deal of difference.

 

1. The first thing to always try is a different ink. You (OK - I) would be surprised by how much difference this can make in how the pen lays ink down. Requires no adjustment, bending, grinding, or anything else.

Along with this, I always adjust nibs with the exact same ink,on the exact same paper. In my case I use Quink Black and a cheap paper I have found at Daiso. Adjusting a pen filled with double dense Noodlers on Rhodia paper tells me nothing about how the pen is performing. Nothing wrong with either of them, but I feel the results end up skewed.

 

2. You can increase the gap between the tines by spreading the tines (bending metal). I sometimes use a thin brass sheet to help this, carefully avoiding splaying the end of the tines. But mostly the tool of choice is fingernails.

This will also broaden the nib. But the gap doesn't need to be spread much, so the trade off might work for what you are looking for. I have also used  fine mylar abrasive to remove material between the tines.  I know that this is a permanent change, but again the difference is so tiny that I frequently think this is the best choice (for me).

 

2. If you bend the metal to spread the tines, this will usually also bend the nib away from the feed. The result might be what you like. You can also heat set the nib a little further from the nib, increasing the flow without spreading tines. This requires practice - too much and flow will stop. Also requires practice as to the heat. Sailors use plastic feeds, so the heat source I use is water a little below boiling point. On ebonite feeds I use a heat gun where I have used it enough to have a good idea of what heat setting. The heat gun will damage the plastic feed. Practice, practice, practice....

 

3. Metal surfaces that are too smooth can have a higher surface tension, and not flow as well. In some cases I have slightly roughened the contact point - think 6000 micro mesh, then smooth back with 12,000 or even some finer abrasives (mylar lapping sheets 0.5micron, for example). A slight texturing will increase ink flow. Too much and the nib will feel draggy, but the increased flow can reduce this feeling. You are trading off one effect for another.

 

4. The same effect can happen on the inside surface of the nib. I sometimes pull the nib out and scuff the inside surface (not the tip) in lines along the direction of the nib. I'm sometimes surprised by how poorly the plating was done where you can't see it, but this helps whether the plating was perfect or not. I've talked to at least one other pro repair person who does this. This can increase flow with no change in any other dimensions, but of course you need to feel comfortable in pulling the nib and feed.

 

I guess I'm super picky, and end up doing some amount of adjustment on just about every pen I get, which I must admit is a lot. It's pretty rare to cause an un-recoverable screw up these days, but no so a few years ago.

 

We live in the golden age of self pen adjustment, since you can buy a replacement steel nib and feed for not that much and even total destruction isn't that much money. Alas - the same isn't true for your Sailor. The adjustments are no different any any other modern pen, but as far as I know if you mess up there is no way back except sending it in for repair. Making this not the pen to start with - sort of depends on how brave you are.

 

If this is the first pen you have tuned/adjusted, getting it to an expert is probably a good idea. If you can get to a pen show and have them do it while you watch, you can ask a few questions and learn.

 

.

 

 

 

i tried to increase the distance between the tines, that made it a little wet but not as much as i want so i tried to increase the distance between the feed and the nib, i think i over did it so the ink flow stopped, after some fiddling i made it work again. I was wondering if decreasing the nib feed distance will make is drier or wetter? and why?regarding the surface of both the nib and feed, what grit sanding would u suggest? and finally would you recommend modifying the feed ?



#12 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 01:48

 

the sailor that i have is not worth the hassle + there are other sailors that i want to make wetter as well !

If you have that many Sailors that all share the same condition, it may be that you need to change your selection of inks.

 

One dry pen out of a set is an anomaly deserving of special work to correct. Multiple dry pens all from one maker probably indicates the maker's normal design criteria for ink flow, and that one should either match them with high-flow ink, or try a different manufacturer.


Edited by BaronWulfraed, 24 January 2020 - 01:49.


#13 WLSpec

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 01:59

I accidentally overflexed a 21k Sailor nib a bit  :crybaby: When it happened, I was worried I would have to pay for a repair (and I still am a little)

 

But now the nib is wetter, and there are no flow issues! It's actually quite nice :)



#14 The-Thinker

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 02:08

If you have that many Sailors that all share the same condition, it may be that you need to change your selection of inks.

 

One dry pen out of a set is an anomaly deserving of special work to correct. Multiple dry pens all from one maker probably indicates the maker's normal design criteria for ink flow, and that one should either match them with high-flow ink, or try a different manufacturer.

 

i agree with that, i currently purchased a pelikan and will see if the hype about their wetness is accurate. What are some wet inks that you might recommend to try?



#15 The-Thinker

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 02:11

I accidentally overflexed a 21k Sailor nib a bit  :crybaby: When it happened, I was worried I would have to pay for a repair (and I still am a little)

 

But now the nib is wetter, and there are no flow issues! It's actually quite nice :)

 

when a mistake turns into a pleasant experience :P i tried making the nib wetter by increasing the nib feed distance, ended up by messing up the ink flow, i was glad i made it work again :P that was a rough tuning experience. I tend to overflex my 21k too and had the same problem as you!



#16 markh

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 06:04

i tried to increase the distance between the tines, that made it a little wet but not as much as i want so i tried to increase the distance between the feed and the nib, i think i over did it so the ink flow stopped, after some fiddling i made it work again. I was wondering if decreasing the nib feed distance will make is drier or wetter? and why?regarding the surface of both the nib and feed, what grit sanding would u suggest? and finally would you recommend modifying the feed ?

 

First - try a different ink. Also make sure that there isn't dried up old ink (or something else) clogging the flow. Nib tuning can't fix this.

 

Second - if the space between the tines, or from the nib to feed is too great ink will stop flowing.

A rule of thumb for nib/feed spacing is that a sheet of high quality paper (think 22-24 lb) should just slip in. Like all rules of thumb, this one must bow to reality, but that's a starting point

 

Third - for reshaping the nib tip (as in making a medium nib a fine) I use micromesh. Usually 2400 for serious changes, 3600 for more subtle changes. The result is too rough to use, so I polish with 6000, followed by 12,000. This is a slow process compared with the professionals who use a bench lathe or a Dreml, but it allows me to approach what I want incrementally.

 

For giving some texture to the tip- usually 12,000 is enough, but sometimes I use 6,000, get the pen to a place that I like, then polish up a little with 12,000. I usually finish up with 1.5 micron mylar. All with a light touch.

 

As to the (plastic) feed itself. I will carefully set the feed to the nib (see rule of thumb) using water just below boil. Then dunk in cold water to harden. If you have bent the nib  too far , you can't to this and need to bend the nib back to a reasonable shape. Which probably means pulling the nib and feed. Hope you are beginning to see how this can go on and on.....

 

As to cutting the channels in the feed to make them deeper - the nature of the plastic makes that very hard. You will most likely cut new channels that don't go where you want. I have sometimes had this work, mostly not, so don't do anymore unless I'm prepared to accept the risk and throw out the feed and replace, which wouldn't be the case with a Sailor feed as they can't be purchased separately.

 

You can't learn this with written explanation - only by practice, and be assured you will get it wrong the first few times you try - sorry.

 

Remember - practice - practice - practice.

 

.


"The objective in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane" - - Marcus Aurelius Antoninus .

#17 The-Thinker

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 21:46

 

First - try a different ink. Also make sure that there isn't dried up old ink (or something else) clogging the flow. Nib tuning can't fix this.

 

Second - if the space between the tines, or from the nib to feed is too great ink will stop flowing.

A rule of thumb for nib/feed spacing is that a sheet of high quality paper (think 22-24 lb) should just slip in. Like all rules of thumb, this one must bow to reality, but that's a starting point

 

Third - for reshaping the nib tip (as in making a medium nib a fine) I use micromesh. Usually 2400 for serious changes, 3600 for more subtle changes. The result is too rough to use, so I polish with 6000, followed by 12,000. This is a slow process compared with the professionals who use a bench lathe or a Dreml, but it allows me to approach what I want incrementally.

 

For giving some texture to the tip- usually 12,000 is enough, but sometimes I use 6,000, get the pen to a place that I like, then polish up a little with 12,000. I usually finish up with 1.5 micron mylar. All with a light touch.

 

As to the (plastic) feed itself. I will carefully set the feed to the nib (see rule of thumb) using water just below boil. Then dunk in cold water to harden. If you have bent the nib  too far , you can't to this and need to bend the nib back to a reasonable shape. Which probably means pulling the nib and feed. Hope you are beginning to see how this can go on and on.....

 

As to cutting the channels in the feed to make them deeper - the nature of the plastic makes that very hard. You will most likely cut new channels that don't go where you want. I have sometimes had this work, mostly not, so don't do anymore unless I'm prepared to accept the risk and throw out the feed and replace, which wouldn't be the case with a Sailor feed as they can't be purchased separately.

 

You can't learn this with written explanation - only by practice, and be assured you will get it wrong the first few times you try - sorry.

 

Remember - practice - practice - practice.

 

.

 

Thank you so much for your detailed and comprehensive explanation to all my questions. I'm truly thankful for the time you put in writing this comment with points and whatnot. I will follow your steps and work patiently and practice and hope to get the wanted result. Currently waiting for a good loop to arrive to start working on the nib and feed and let you know what happens. 







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