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What Happens For An Extremely Smooth Nib Tipping!

nib oversmooth tipping

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21 replies to this topic

#1 Arijitdutta

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 13:16

Happy New Year and a New Decade too, fellow FPN members. 

 

I would like to share an insight to which I would also like to know your opinions.

 

I tune my own pens and even my friends' pens. I have gotten pretty good at it and I can do some amateur grinds like grinding down nib widths though I am yet to master it. Recently I was tuning up a nib and came to observe a fact. Before I tell you what I observed, there is a post that a fellow FPN member shared a few years ago: 
 

Annotation 2020-01-01 182007.jpg

 

I was working on a Faber Castell medium nib which is extremely smooth but has NO BABY'S BOTTOM. I had cleaned up the pen thoroughly by disassembling the feed and nib. I was using an Krishna Lyrebird blue which I think is dry(?) or maybe I can say its flow is not good. What I observed: 

 

1) The pen initially with its super smooth tipping gave a very uneven flow of ink, ie parts of the letters were not of consistent width. (this very thing happened with other super smooth nibs too when using this ink)

 

2) I roughened up the tip just a bit and then I brought it to the paper and voila, it was behaving extremely well. Though it had some feedback it had no uneven flow of ink on paper on any of the letters. 

 

3) I polished it up once again with Mylar and Micromesh papers to a glassy smooth feeling. The problem came back. Uneven flow. 

 

4) This time I gave it a small "foot" on the tipping that is mostly found on Sailor nibs. This time it was even better than before. A perfect 10/10 inkflow. No scratchiness whatsoever, has a mild pleasant feedback. Writes on the least amount of pressure yet reliable.

 

Opinions? Am I missing something? 



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#2 MuddyWaters

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 16:35

Thanks for that interesting post. Can you describe in other words what you mean by the sailor foot?

Link to a post about ergonomics I made: http://www.fountainp...with/?p=4179072


#3 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 18:51

Many 'noobies' insist on melted butter smooth at all cost...micro mesh is god...........not paying any attention to advice paper makes a world of difference and that a fine slick paper is a different world.

Then certain inks are wet so help a nib be smoother.

Paper and ink can make a nib write up to a full width narrower, than on cheap copy paper.

 

:lticaptd:Some  six months or a year later, some are back here asking how to get rid of butter smooth.

 

Being lazy, and buying mostly old 'cheap' pens.....vintage, all I wanted to was remove the drag from the 'iridium rust'. So was quite satisfied with good and smooth, the level just under butter smooth.

One can feel the paper just a tad.

 

But getting folks to move from the cheap papers to good and better paper is a long battle.

 

I chase two toned shading inks....and outside of Rhoda 80g and Tomolo? River 70g, a paper has to be 90g or better to have the ink shade.

(Ink Jet paper is a 100% no no.) 100% & 50% cotton paper are not good for shading inks, but are a good smooth ride.

90g paper costs more than twice what cheap 80g copy paper............but you don't have to put it in your printer. Can last for years, can have it made into a notebook also.

 

Pure Laser is better than a combo Laser and Ink Jet, in a compromise has been made for Ink Jet.

 

Good to better paper costs two mechanically cans of Coke or two cups of Starbucks coffee. Neither is good for you. :P  


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#4 OMASsimo

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:19

What Faber-Castell pen are you referring to, vintage or current? I assume current because I've never experienced over-polishing with vintage pens of this brand or any other.

 

Your observation makes sense but is a bit subjective. How smooth is smooth? I have pens, vintage as well as modern, which to my feeling have basically no noticeable feedback yet still write perfectly. For me it seems that the step from very smooth to over-polished is very narrow.



#5 Estycollector

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:22

Friend just did a few circles on the Wing Sung 601 I sent him on .03 micron 3M lapping film. Says it's transformed the nib. 



#6 Mech-for-i

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:25

and for blind writing ; a bit of positive feedback telling you where and which direction your nib is pointing, moving, and oriented is almost a needed property



#7 tamiya

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:27

Opinions? Am I missing something?


Confirmed... I don't like nibs polished till they're mirror smooth & glide like they're on glass. They're better with a bit of tooth/drag, they start better and the ink line becomes much more regulated.

Also don't like flat spots... not on my tyres & not on my nibs. It's not feet for the lunar lander, don't want baby's bottom but shouldn't grind perfectly flat platform down there either. Slightly convex is nice.

When I've overpolished, I just take out the coarsest Mylar (think its 1000) and give it a crosshatch "X". Doesn't take much, 3-5 strokes in each direction.

#8 BrassRatt

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:51


Many 'noobies' insist on melted butter smooth at all cost...micro mesh is god...........not paying any attention to advice paper makes a world of difference and that a fine slick paper is a different world.

Then certain inks are wet so help a nib be smoother.

Paper and ink can make a nib write up to a full width narrower, than on cheap copy paper.

 

:lticaptd:Some  six months or a year later, some are back here asking how to get rid of butter smooth.

 

 

Sorry, I can't just let that slide.  While I'm not one of the prolific posting experts here, I have been using and collecting fountain pens for about ten years.  

 

I still very much prefer a butter-smooth sensually frictionless writing experience.  I like Tomoe River paper partly for helping to achieve this pleasurable quality, versus toothy papers.  

 

So no, it is not just 'noobies' and the ignorant.  Preference for scratchiness is not necessarily a sign of sophistication. 

 

Thank you. 


Edited by BrassRatt, 02 January 2020 - 03:54.


#9 Arijitdutta

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 04:26

Thanks for that interesting post. Can you describe in other words what you mean by the sailor foot?

 

http://www.fountainp...d-nib-question/

 

Sailor nibs have a small flat spot on the tipping. Many love it, many don't. Cause it gives a smaller sweet spot than other round tips. (dont think it will scratch by rotating the pen by 2-3 degrees, it will scratch if you hold the pen like an oblique nib position)

 

What Faber-Castell pen are you referring to, vintage or current? I assume current because I've never experienced over-polishing with vintage pens of this brand or any other.

 

Your observation makes sense but is a bit subjective. How smooth is smooth? I have pens, vintage as well as modern, which to my feeling have basically no noticeable feedback yet still write perfectly. For me it seems that the step from very smooth to over-polished is very narrow.

 

It is a Faber Castell Ambition. Moder Faber Castell nibs come as EXTREMELY smooth, as smooth as M1000s. I did the exact same thing, hot butter on glass.

 

I tried this on another nib today which came with a baby's bottom. With wet inks that flows like a river, these super smooth nibs work perfectly, but with some dry inks these nibs exhibit some problem spreading the ink over the complete tipping area.

 

 

Confirmed... I don't like nibs polished till they're mirror smooth & glide like they're on glass. They're better with a bit of tooth/drag, they start better and the ink line becomes much more regulated.

Also don't like flat spots... not on my tyres & not on my nibs. It's not feet for the lunar lander, don't want baby's bottom but shouldn't grind perfectly flat platform down there either. Slightly convex is nice.

When I've overpolished, I just take out the coarsest Mylar (think its 1000) and give it a crosshatch "X". Doesn't take much, 3-5 strokes in each direction.

 

Yes "regulated" was the term I was looking for. 

Flat spots do create a problem who rotates the nib to a oblique position. It starts scratching. Though for me it's perfectly fine. I don't rotate the nib much. 



#10 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 11:16

Preference for scratchiness is not necessarily a sign of sophistication.?????? :bunny01:

Gee no ten penny nail in the wall to put my Top Hat on. :(

 

 

Good and smooth is not scratchy nor toothy.............and Jar does like butter smooth, and he's no noobie.....If you have been here for ten years you have read a thousand or two posts of how to make a nib butter smooth from noobies.

.Some is a word I used, come back tired of butter smooth and want to know how to rough up a nib so it's nice to write with.

If you still feel noobie after ten years is not my problem.

 

You don't get butter smooth in vintage nibs pre '70, not even NOS......good and smooth is what I got on my three or four NOS pens................which is quite good enough for me.......I don't skate and slide on slick paper..................one should have a few of those papers just to know what other folks are talking about.. Didn't notice butter smooth on my NOS or any other semi-vintage pens...up to say '97.

 

Butter Smooth seems to be a modern affliction caused by poor paper. Having tried a gel and hybred cartridge ball point, can see if someone comes over from ball points, and hears how smooth a fountain pen is....why he'd search for butter smooth to beat a gel/hybrid pen for smooth. (In Germany we are often 10 years behind the US....just lately our free ball points have gel or hybrid cartridges.)

Many noobies are into buying new pens....I was, instead of upgrading their paper.....and modern cheap nibs might well need to match a good paper and wet ink....to be smoother.

But upgrading paper is a last resort........instead of the first.

 

I do have a few butter smooth nibs if using good paper, I seldom reach for them, & one toothy (where it is I have no idea....but I have one) ....in one does need to have one nib to know what is what. Toothy is like writing with a pencil......not 'scratchy'.

Scratchy is caused by misaligned nibs or chipped nib tipping..............holding a fountain pen high before the big index finger can cause scratchy......could be my grip has a bit of sophistication.

;)

I do know what drag of 'iridium rust' of old pens is....but as I said, good and smooth, with a touch of paper feel is good enough for me.....(so a touch of micro-mesh does the minimum removal, instead of taking hours to look in a mirror) ..............I seldom buy new pens....if so, more 200's which are more semi-vintage in nib, than new and over polished slide off of slick paper Pelikan nibs.

I do like slick paper.....like lots of papers. I think I have some 40 different papers....use to have more. Some folks are nice at sending nice paper around the world. So I need not just use 'slick' papers, I have lots a bit under slick.

 

Butter Smooth is real good in 100-50% cotton paper. :P Don't waste shading ink on them, they swallow shading. 

 

If one works at it one could stay in butter smooth nails, poor paper and hummm would have to think long and hard to figure out an ink for such a set up.

 

I do have a full spectrum of nibs from vintage to modern....mostly don't use nail, semi-nail........mostly use regular flex, semi-flex, maxi-semi-flex, some superflex, first stage Easy Full Flex more than Wet noodle (just scribble, nothing fancy)............ah, don't have a Weak Kneed Wet Noodle nor do I want one.

 

Not even one or two toothy nibs are scratchy (just toothy like writing with a pencil)...much less the others.........if using a wet ink, the paper feel will be less.........as will the shading. A dry ink will give more paper feel, and often shades.

 

I don't go out of my way looking for one of my butter smooth nibs...........most of mine outside the toothy one or two, are good and smooth........My butter smooth Townsend....is under the bed, it's a nail. My 605 was stubbed to a butter smooth stub....in B. As a stub it's not bad at all butter smooth.

 

I don't throw Holy Water on butter smooth nibs....I just keep it handy.

 

Yep, paper will make a huge difference..........my vintage late '30-40's BCHR Osmia mdl 76 Supra nibbed EF....a maxi-semi-flex nib.....is very close to butter smooth on Rhodia 90g.I was rather surprised at how smooth it was. On common copy paper I can hear and feel the paper. :happyberet:

 

....ah yes, the Golden Age of Paper died un-noticed some time in the '80's. With good to better paper one don't need butter smooth at all costs.........good paper makes most nibs write smoother............but using cheap paper one does need butter smooth to cut through the drag of the cheap paper.

 

 

Did mention didn't I, of how a butter smooth nib slides lifeless around on slick paper?

Nope not going to give up slick paper.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#11 alexwi

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 00:30

Upgrading the paper is an option if all you write on is paper provided by you.

 

In my case, I want the writing experience to be pleasant on the papers I come across. If I grab a piece of paper at a client's office to scribble some notes during a meeting, it would be pretty interesting for me to ask them to switch to Rhodia or what not.

 

This is the reason why I never test pens at a store on their pads, which are likely to be premium paper that I'll never come across in real life. Instead, I use my own notebook and a few sheets of the kind of paper I'm likely to run into (yes, that would be copy paper). The pen I'm testing must write to my satisfaction on those.

 

Likewise with vintage pens whose nibs I adjust. I make those adjustments based on the same criteria.

 

Regarding butter-smoothness, that's really subjective and I can't even describe what it is that I like in terms of smoothness or feedback, except that I don't want my nibs to feel scratchy or, much less, "catch" on the paper.

 

alex



#12 A Smug Dill

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 04:37

Sorry, I can't just let that slide._...‹snip›... Preference for scratchiness is not necessarily a sign of sophistication.


Neither is exaggerating someone else's position, which one perceives to be contrary to one's, own to attempt to discredit their opinion. You're the only person who mentioned scratchiness, let alone express or advocate a preference for such. Does someone else's view that "extremely smooth is not all/always good, and it can fail or cause problems in these scenarios..." offend your sensibilities, even though they're not trying to convince you? By all means, be an evangelist for the "butter-smooth sensually frictionless writing experience", and I look forward to your pitch to those users who aren't yet decided as to why they ought to reject, dislike and/or avoid writing experiences where they could feel any friction at all?
 

How smooth is smooth? I have pens, vintage as well as modern, which to my feeling have basically no noticeable feedback yet still write perfectly. For me it seems that the step from very smooth to over-polished is very narrow.

 
 
In my view, there is a continuous spectrum between smooth and scratchy,

 

<smooth>


frictionless and completely devoid of feedback

= BAD, detrimental to a successful writing outcome of producing visible marks on the page in the places and shapes exactly as intended

completely silent, with minimal kinaesthetic feedback due friction

= WORKABLE, but not conducive to a controlled writing outcome; demands too much mental focus and effort (and thus "wastes" effort)

mostly silent with "pencil-like" feedback

= BEST for both the experience and the writing outcome

"noisy" with audible feedback that could be readily picked up by a microphone when recording a video of one's writing, but

without any damage to the coating or surface of the paper

= TOLERABLE, depending on just how loud the sounds are, but LESS THAN IDEAL

nib ripping the coating or surface of the paper on some pen strokes and removing/gathering fibres with some pen strokes

= BAD, outright damaging to the product of writing by ruining the underlying medium (or substrate)

 

<scratchy>

 


and the problem with someone espousing "smoother is better", without expressly qualifying the statement or setting limits, is that the logical conclusion must be (they think) "extreme smoothness is best". If there are 101 gradations between smooth (100%) and scratchy (0%) as a scale, 100% > 99%, and applying their statement it would mean they asserted that 100% smooth is better than 99% smooth on that scale. Whereas the O.P. is obviously saying that 99% smooth is better than 100% smooth, not that 9% smooth is better 100% smooth.


As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.


#13 BrassRatt

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 05:42

... By all means, be an evangelist for the "butter-smooth sensually frictionless writing experience", and I look forward to your pitch to those users who aren't yet decided as to why they ought to reject, dislike and/or avoid writing experiences where they could feel any friction at all?

 

Speaking of exaggerating someone else's position ... !

 

I make no such pitch.  Why would I want to change your position?  Or an undecided user's?  Experience should be the basis for their preferences and yours. 

 

But you seem to want to override mine, against my experience. 

 

I do object to being condescended to over my preference for complete smoothness.  You call it "BAD, detrimental", as if that were objective fact, and attack my preference, and me for holding it.  But I observe that my writing is better and easier when writing friction is the least that I have experienced, though the condition "frictionless and completely devoid of feedback" has probably never occurred in this world. 

 

What offends my sensibilities is that condescension.  Yes, some exaggeration seemed to be the best way to call attention to it.  

 

And as for being smeared as an "evangelist" ... that's pretty funny in the context of this thread. 



#14 A Smug Dill

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 06:38

I do object to being condescended to over my preference for complete smoothness.


Who condescended? You even quoted Bo Bo Olson, and he specifically wrote, "Many 'noobies' insist on melted butter smooth at all cost...micro mesh is god...........not paying any attention to advice paper makes a world of difference and that a fine slick paper is a different world." Are you one of them? If not, then where's the condescension directed towards you? Or do you want to challenge his claim of "many 'noobies'" because you believe there are few or none?

You call it "BAD, detrimental", as if that were objective fact,


I specifically prefaced that whole piece with, "In my view," and even marked up in italic which bits are my view.

and attack my preference, and me for holding it.


How did I attack it? I don't share it, I don't care about it, I don't think there is any objective merit in it but that's not an attack of personal preferences, any more than I would if I wrote, "I hate liquorice, I think it tastes foul," (which I truly do) as if that's an attack on fans of liquorice.

You like what you like, you don't need to justify it or base it on either objective merit or some framework of measurement that your peers and equals recognise or share, and nobody can tell you you're wrong about what suits you, even if they're advocating appreciation of something else and (even if they were) trying to influence the masses of the not-yet-firmly-decided.

As always:  1. Implicit in everything and every instance I write on FPN is the invitation for you to judge me as a peer in the community. I think it's only due respect to take each other's written word in online discussion seriously and apply critical judgment.  2. I do not presume to judge for you what is right, correct or valid. If I make a claim, or refute a statement in a thread, and link to references and other information in support, I beseech you to review and consider those, and judge for yourself. I may be wrong. My position or say-so carries no more weight than anyone else's here, and external parties can speak for themselves with what they have published.  3. I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable. If it is something you can test for yourself and see the results, I entreat you to do so.


#15 Arijitdutta

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 08:15

Chill down people. It's not what I was talking about whose preference is for butter smooth or a feedbacky ride. It's completely a matter of perspective or we would have been clones of each other. We are all different. 

 

I tried this on a few other nibs as well. I observed that the ones which are extremely polished needs a wet inkflow (none of them exhibits baby's bottom). But the ones having a pencil feedback happens to do well with any ink. Am I missing something when I am giving the nibs a well polished state that it feels skippy a bit? Is there something more needed to be done?



#16 tamiya

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 09:23

I tried this on a few other nibs as well. I observed that the ones which are extremely polished needs a wet inkflow (none of them exhibits baby's bottom). But the ones having a pencil feedback happens to do well with any ink. Am I missing something when I am giving the nibs a well polished state that it feels skippy a bit? Is there something more needed to be done?


Isn't it all about surface tension? Surface tension prevents ink from dripping out, you need to break that surface tension to make the ink flow.

If your nib ball is polished it's like a freshly waxed car - the water will just bead up, leaving no ink at the base of the nib ball to touch the paper. A less polished ball will leave more ink at the tip.

#17 hari317

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 09:37

 

 

Am I missing something when I am giving the nibs a well polished state that it feels skippy a bit?

Pls look up Contact angle Vs Surface roughness.

'Contact angle' inversely indicates wettability of a material.

 

Hope this helps.


In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#18 Arijitdutta

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 04:20

Isn't it all about surface tension? Surface tension prevents ink from dripping out, you need to break that surface tension to make the ink flow.

If your nib ball is polished it's like a freshly waxed car - the water will just bead up, leaving no ink at the base of the nib ball to touch the paper. A less polished ball will leave more ink at the tip.


Pls look up Contact angle Vs Surface roughness.
'Contact angle' inversely indicates wettability of a material.
 
Hope this helps.


Thanks. This is a proper logical explanation to what I was asking for. I think I am not going to polish the nib tipping up so much like I used to before.

#19 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 21:35

:thumbup: As stated often, in lots of threads, I'm too lazy to polish to butter smooth....in I buy old pens with micro-corrosion or 'iridium rust'. I find good and smooth the level under, that works well with slick paper just fine.  A slick paper like Rhoda 80-90g will make those nibs very smooth but still easily controllable. I feel a difference going from good paper, 90-100-170g, to slick paper like Rhoda or Clairefontaine Triumph. ... My Gmund 170g is a very good smooth paper, I get great shading, it is the level just under slick...............unless someone has never tried slick paper. If not they might think it was slick.

 

My new pens (modern)  that are butter smooth get less use. ...Part of that reason is one is a semi-nail, the other a nail......and one is too fancy for much use, has a mondern MB 'Springy' nib, good tine bend but only 2 X tine spread....and has a real fat B. (I got to go back to using my wide nibs like I use to . I do myself feel that the new 200's nibs.... 5 of my 6 are new, (one is a semi-vintage W.Germany one that for me is adequately smooth), and very good and smooth.

 

I prefer the clean line of the semi-vintage and vintage nibs....prefer a comfortable ride with a bit of spring of regular flex or with my many semi&maxi flex....spring and tine spread +, ++.

 

I do remove 'iridium rust' drag...which is not that much work, to get some of them to good and smooth. So I'm not against smoothing a nib.....it's just I'm too lazy and don't see any benefits of working long and hard to get a nib butter smooth, when the level under that, is easy to reach and is good'n smooth. 

 

I always keep in mind, what is gone...is gone!

 

If one only alternates stub and CI, one has some 45 nibs in different widths and flex levels. In that will be in various levels of smoothness. none scratchy. Many were never butter smooth in it wasn't needed in the Golden Age of Good Paper. (We are living in the Golden age of Ink.)

 

Some of the factory German vintage '50-70 nibs are stubs, with very little tipping, my Osmia nibs are very minimal tipped (being almost always broke and like now iridium was more expensive than gold; but they used Osmium which is another story....same expense) even for the era with its stubbed nibs, so there is no error allowed. (IMO no need.) But I do push semi-flex..... :bunny01:....come to think of it regular flex also.  :happyberet:


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 04 January 2020 - 21:51.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#20 tinta

tinta

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 22:42

:thumbup: As stated often, in lots of threads, I'm too lazy to polish to butter smooth....in I buy old pens with micro-corrosion or 'iridium rust'. I find good and smooth the level under, that works well with slick paper just fine.  A slick paper like Rhoda 80-90g will make those nibs very smooth but still easily controllable. I feel a difference going from good paper, 90-100-170g, to slick paper like Rhoda or Clairefontaine Triumph. ... My Gmund 170g is a very good smooth paper, I get great shading, it is the level just under slick...............unless someone has never tried slick paper. If not they might think it was slick.

 

My new pens (modern)  that are butter smooth get less use. ...Part of that reason is one is a semi-nail, the other a nail......and one is too fancy for much use, has a mondern MB 'Springy' nib, good tine bend but only 2 X tine spread....and has a real fat B. (I got to go back to using my wide nibs like I use to . I do myself feel that the new 200's nibs.... 5 of my 6 are new, (one is a semi-vintage W.Germany one that for me is adequately smooth), and very good and smooth.

 

I prefer the clean line of the semi-vintage and vintage nibs....prefer a comfortable ride with a bit of spring of regular flex or with my many semi&maxi flex....spring and tine spread +, ++.

 

I do remove 'iridium rust' drag...which is not that much work, to get some of them to good and smooth. So I'm not against smoothing a nib.....it's just I'm too lazy and don't see any benefits of working long and hard to get a nib butter smooth, when the level under that, is easy to reach and is good'n smooth. 

 

I always keep in mind, what is gone...is gone!

 

If one only alternates stub and CI, one has some 45 nibs in different widths and flex levels. In that will be in various levels of smoothness. none scratchy. Many were never butter smooth in it wasn't needed in the Golden Age of Good Paper. (We are living in the Golden age of Ink.)

 

Some of the factory German vintage '50-70 nibs are stubs, with very little tipping, my Osmia nibs are very minimal tipped (being almost always broke and like now iridium was more expensive than gold; but they used Osmium which is another story....same expense) even for the era with its stubbed nibs, so there is no error allowed. (IMO no need.) But I do push semi-flex..... :bunny01:....come to think of it regular flex also.  :happyberet:

I get what BoBo is saying about how the quality of paper can be a deciding factor in what a writing experience will be.

But don't forget to consider the characteristics of an ink in this writing equation. 

How lubricated?  How wet?  How dry?

 

While testing a new pen with various inks, my new Sailor 14c. H-B "factory" nib went from butter smooth to almost scratchy, from a narrow (Japanese) Medium-width line to a wide & wet (Euro) Broad, using the same APICA notebook paper. 

Two inks just did not perform well with this same nib.


*Sailor 1911-M, Black/gold, 14c. 0.8 mm. stub(JM) *2 Sailor 1911-M Burgundy/gold pens: 14c. 0.6 mm. "round-nosed" CI (MM) & 1.1 mm. CI (JM) *Sailor Professional-Gear Slim Spec. Ed. "Fire",14c.factory "H-B" *2 Kaweco SPECIAL fountain pens: 14c."M" "B",-0.5 mm & 0.7 mm stubs (PB) *Kaweco Stainless Steel Lilliput, 14c "B" -0.6 mm. stub (PB) *Montblanc 254, 14c. "BB" (1.1 mm?) flügelfeder factory stub





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nib, oversmooth, tipping



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