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Fountain Pen Revolution Release A ‘Himalaya V2’

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54 replies to this topic

#41 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 04:02

Some further follow-up:

 

(1) I mentioned in my review that I had managed to crack the back of the grip section by significantly overtightening the converter, and that Kevin from FPR had sent me a replacement.  Given the congested nature of the postal system right now, it took a while for the replacement to reach me - and when it did, I had a problem: it took an enormous amount of effort to ram the nib and feed into the section, and even then I wasn't sure I had it seated far enough in.

 

I emailed Kevin to ask his advice, and was told that my best bet was to heat set the feed and nib into the grip section - and yes, that did mean heating the section itself (plus the feed) in near-boiling water, then inserting the nib and feed into the section.  They do this for every pen before it heads out the door.  I was assured this wouldn't cause the acrylic to melt, and I can confirm that this was the case for my new vermilion section.  

 

I mention this because I think it's important for users to know, this is not as easy a pen to tinker with as the #5.5 Himalayas (where the nib and feed can be removed and re-seated pretty easily).  With the V2 pen, you have two options upon removing the nib and feed.  The first is to work out the orientation of the previous "set" of the section (the centre hole will no longer be perfectly circular, it'll be a little bit flatter where the nib sits - honestly, I found it a little hard to tell!).  The second is to re-heat set the whole thing, which isn't hard (I had my first go this morning), but takes a bit more time and effort.

 

[I asked Kevin if he was willing to sell me a replacement grip section for my original #6 Himalaya, so I could convert it to a V2 with gold trim - he kindly complied, but suggested I retain the shorter feed in the section.  I plan to do some more fiddling with this pen too, then provide feedback.]

 

(2) For anyone interested, I cleaned out the pigment ink from my Jade Smoke V2 Himalaya, and replaced with Blackstone Black Stump (an inoffensive grey/black ink with purple undertones).  It's now writing much more reliably, and the railroading evident in the handwriting samples above is no longer an issue.

 

I still recommend these pens as a better option (for me) than the #5.5s - but if you like repeatedly swapping nibs around (as I do!), you need to be aware it's not as straightforward with the new pens as with the original.



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#42 TruthPil

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:26


I still recommend these pens as a better option (for me) than the #5.5s - but if you like repeatedly swapping nibs around (as I do!), you need to be aware it's not as straightforward with the new pens as with the original.

Thanks for the update. This is really helpful information for me because it means I can hold on to my V1 5.5s. Swapping nibs with them is so easy and I have a wide variety of JoWo #5 and vintage nibs that easily swap in.

 

Does this mean that nib swapping on the V2 is always going to require heat setting (or rather, resetting)? That'd be a big minus in my book, so I'd probably just keep them with the original nibs.


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#43 Honeybadgers

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:33

No, the V2 shouldn't require any more heat setting than the 5.5 version. It's just the same feed as the noodlers konrad, so it's equally easy to play with. It's just going to accept the bigger nibs out there.

 

If you're buying a pen for everyday use and not as a housing for different nibs, the #6 is where I think I'd recommend, with standard nibs. 

 

But if you need a pen for nib swaps, the V1/ 5.5 model is where you should go.


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#44 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:51

Thanks for the update. This is really helpful information for me because it means I can hold on to my V1 5.5s. Swapping nibs with them is so easy and I have a wide variety of JoWo #5 and vintage nibs that easily swap in.

 

Does this mean that nib swapping on the V2 is always going to require heat setting (or rather, resetting)? That'd be a big minus in my book, so I'd probably just keep them with the original nibs.

 

By all means hang on to your 5.5s, they're still great pens - and I swap nibs in them frequently!  As far as the V2 goes, I think there are 3 possible answers to your question:

 

(1) No, the nibs often come out more easily than the longer feeds that come with the V2 (which need to be firmly wedged in) - so you can just do a straight nib swap, without the need for fiddling with the feed at all.

(2) No, the feed should fit straight back in with the nib (if you *do* choose to remove it), as long as you take care to note the orientation of the feed to the grip section on removal.  Because the grip section has been heat set to the feed, it *is* direction specific - though it *can* be re-set if you get confused.

(3) No, you could ask for the shorter feed that comes with the original (gold trim) #6 Himalaya - which, because it's shorter, doesn't need to be rammed in as far.

 

See next reply for more comments...



#45 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:54

No, the V2 shouldn't require any more heat setting than the 5.5 version. It's just the same feed as the noodlers konrad, so it's equally easy to play with. It's just going to accept the bigger nibs out there.

 

If you're buying a pen for everyday use and not as a housing for different nibs, the #6 is where I think I'd recommend, with standard nibs. 

 

But if you need a pen for nib swaps, the V1/ 5.5 model is where you should go.

 

Yes, the V2 *does* require more heat setting than the 5.5 version, because the feed is longer and needs to be rammed in more firmly.  And because the grip section is heat-set (by the folks at FPR) to accommodate the feed, it's not perfectly circular.  I know from painful experience that if you put the nib and feed back in the wrong way, it won't seat as far in, and you'll get ink leaking out between the "nib collar" and the feed...

 

Not everyone is constantly wanting to swap nibs out (or obsessively clean by disassembling) - for those who do, you just need to be aware of the need to take careful note of how the nib and feed were oriented relative to the collar as you removed them, and be sure to reinsert (very firmly!) the same way.



#46 peroride

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:30

More notes for future customers:

 

Got a new Himalaya V2 with EF UltraFlex but so far it has been an off and on non-starter. Must have gotten a lemon  :(

 

The brown ebonite pen is lovely, good build quality and pairs well with my Noodler's Chestnut Boston Safety if it would actually reliably write  :angry:

 

The nib is the great - usual cut out scalloped shoulders design that everyone seems to be using but the feed leaves much to be desired. 

 

Underside fins and channels are shallow cuts and decorative as no ink would load there, suggesting main flow at top channel against the nib. Flushing the feed encounters high back pressure as there is no central nipple channel as in Bock and Jowo converter housing to aid flow. And unlike the similar looking Noodler's Ahab feed which has a central breather tube, outflow is relegated to the top channel suggesting easier to clog. 

 

Initial fill with Organic Studio Nitrogen was a big mistake, it would gush wet then starve like a desert. Unscrewing body and priming feed burped ink though pants making thigh look like a side of beef fat, inspector branded blue :lol:

 

Not sure if that additional FPR precaution (mentioned in thread) of silicone grease between the converter and section got accidently into the feed  :( it may have explained why ink load in the feed burped despite an air gap in the convertor and ink deep near the piston.

 

If ink is flushed past the feed to drip, it would bleed at the sides of the nib and hard start or 1/2 page session. :wacko: When it does write, the flow is uncontrolled bleeds a thick line but tamed with light bare touch. Gushing line ghosts paper. Flushed with bulb syringe, repeat with old faithful Pelikan and somewhat better at filling an A5 page then the feed starves just like shown on the FPR video but worst.

 

Sometimes I can get it starting again with running water or wet tissue so for now I think of the Himalaya V2 as a dip pen or rather sink pen :lol:

 

Sigh.. more messing around. By far, my most finicky pen; nothing is more FP frustrating than to be teased with the glory of intermittent writing punctuated by utter dry nib stabbing exasperation. 

 

I'm leery about having to heat set nib > feed > section  :unsure:  but it is mentioned in the official debut video so maybe the next step to get it working is dismantlement followed by a thorough toothbrush cleaning. 

 

Video notes:

  • 01:15 careful to heat set the section notice
  • 03:14 pen stops writing and he has to flick the feed against the paper to get it writing again (my experience but less frustrating)
 



#47 Honeybadgers

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:54

 

Yes, the V2 *does* require more heat setting than the 5.5 version, because the feed is longer and needs to be rammed in more firmly.  And because the grip section is heat-set (by the folks at FPR) to accommodate the feed, it's not perfectly circular.  I know from painful experience that if you put the nib and feed back in the wrong way, it won't seat as far in, and you'll get ink leaking out between the "nib collar" and the feed...

 

Not everyone is constantly wanting to swap nibs out (or obsessively clean by disassembling) - for those who do, you just need to be aware of the need to take careful note of how the nib and feed were oriented relative to the collar as you removed them, and be sure to reinsert (very firmly!) the same way.

 

Not quite sure I follow, maybe I'm not understanding well enough. But that hasn't been my experience. I just took mine (came with the ultraflex) and jammed an FPR #6 in it. no problem. Stuck a Jowo #6, no problem. no issues with the gap or heat setting, and they weren't jammed in very hard. Maybe yours has a little bit of QC issues? Or maybe mine is just weirdly good. Mine's an ebonite one too, dunno if those might be a little more forgiving than the acrylic ones.

 

But mine isn't ED'd, I haven't used any of mine that way. Is yours? That might be a reason.

 

I personally kind of think a flexy bottleneck on these pens is the ebonite feed. I think they just don't have a good enough air exchange. I run into issues as well with the flex nibs being firehose wet but running dry. The best indian ebonite feeds I've come across are the ranga #6 ones used in their eyedropper models. I wish I could just buy those, I'd swap all my FPR's and noodlers and everything else I could fit them into.

 

Also I think the indian flex nibs themselves are a problem. The long slit can cause them to break surface tension so far back up the feed that they just kinda give up and stop writing. I have used my V2 with a standard FPR EF nib for a while and had zero issues. I've run into the drying out issue with them in the #5 feed too. It's a reason why I tried out an old eversharp skyline feed in my V1, and paired with a pelikan C100 nib, it's one of the most unbelievably good writers I own.


Edited by Honeybadgers, 11 December 2019 - 08:58.

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#48 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:36

More notes for future customers:

 

Got a new Himalaya V2 with EF UltraFlex but so far it has been an off and on non-starter. Must have gotten a lemon  :(

 

The brown ebonite pen is lovely, good build quality and pairs well with my Noodler's Chestnut Boston Safety if it would actually reliably write  :angry:

 

The nib is the great - usual cut out scalloped shoulders design that everyone seems to be using but the feed leaves much to be desired. 

 

Underside fins and channels are shallow cuts and decorative as no ink would load there, suggesting main flow at top channel against the nib. Flushing the feed encounters high back pressure as there is no central nipple channel as in Bock and Jowo converter housing to aid flow. And unlike the similar looking Noodler's Ahab feed which has a central breather tube, outflow is relegated to the top channel suggesting easier to clog. 

 

Initial fill with Organic Studio Nitrogen was a big mistake, it would gush wet then starve like a desert. Unscrewing body and priming feed burped ink though pants making thigh look like a side of beef fat, inspector branded blue :lol:

 

Not sure if that additional FPR precaution (mentioned in thread) of silicone grease between the converter and section got accidently into the feed  :( it may have explained why ink load in the feed burped despite an air gap in the convertor and ink deep near the piston.

 

If ink is flushed past the feed to drip, it would bleed at the sides of the nib and hard start or 1/2 page session. :wacko: When it does write, the flow is uncontrolled bleeds a thick line but tamed with light bare touch. Gushing line ghosts paper. Flushed with bulb syringe, repeat with old faithful Pelikan and somewhat better at filling an A5 page then the feed starves just like shown on the FPR video but worst.

 

Sometimes I can get it starting again with running water or wet tissue so for now I think of the Himalaya V2 as a dip pen or rather sink pen :lol:

 

Sigh.. more messing around. By far, my most finicky pen; nothing is more FP frustrating than to be teased with the glory of intermittent writing punctuated by utter dry nib stabbing exasperation. 

 

I'm leery about having to heat set nib > feed > section  :unsure:  but it is mentioned in the official debut video so maybe the next step to get it working is dismantlement followed by a thorough toothbrush cleaning. 

 

Video notes:

  • 01:15 careful to heat set the section notice
  • 03:14 pen stops writing and he has to flick the feed against the paper to get it writing again (my experience but less frustrating)
 

 

Definitely worth trying to heat set the feed - it's actually not that complicated.  Might also be worth removing and scrubbing the feed first, to make sure there's nothing gunking up the feed channel.  



#49 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:54

 

Not quite sure I follow, maybe I'm not understanding well enough. But that hasn't been my experience. I just took mine (came with the ultraflex) and jammed an FPR #6 in it. no problem. Stuck a Jowo #6, no problem. no issues with the gap or heat setting, and they weren't jammed in very hard. Maybe yours has a little bit of QC issues? Or maybe mine is just weirdly good. Mine's an ebonite one too, dunno if those might be a little more forgiving than the acrylic ones.

 

But mine isn't ED'd, I haven't used any of mine that way. Is yours? That might be a reason.

 

I personally kind of think a flexy bottleneck on these pens is the ebonite feed. I think they just don't have a good enough air exchange. I run into issues as well with the flex nibs being firehose wet but running dry. The best indian ebonite feeds I've come across are the ranga #6 ones used in their eyedropper models. I wish I could just buy those, I'd swap all my FPR's and noodlers and everything else I could fit them into.

 

Also I think the indian flex nibs themselves are a problem. The long slit can cause them to break surface tension so far back up the feed that they just kinda give up and stop writing. I have used my V2 with a standard FPR EF nib for a while and had zero issues. I've run into the drying out issue with them in the #5 feed too. It's a reason why I tried out an old eversharp skyline feed in my V1, and paired with a pelikan C100 nib, it's one of the most unbelievably good writers I own.

 

Similar issues with both of my V2s - but you may be onto something in terms of the different materials.  I doubt the ebonite grip section / nib collar can be heat-set in the same way as an acrylic section can - so it may be machined slightly differently.

 

I now have all 3 of my #6 Himalayas writing reliably - but as @Honeybadgers points out, they can tend to railroad if you over-flex them, and after that it can take a little while for the feed to catch back up.  

 

Worth pointing out too, maybe, that the people reporting problems with the pen are (mostly) using the ultraflex nibs?  They're a specialty item in their own right!  I've just swapped a regular F nib into one of my V2s, to see how it behaves...



#50 Honeybadgers

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 12:46

One way to really help these indian long slit flex nibs stop railroading is to put a piece of scotch tape on the top to act as an overfeed. helps keep surface tension.


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#51 Alexandra

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 20:34

I bought a Himalaya V2 with an extra-fine,ultra-flex nib while it was on Black Friday sale and am loving it so far. The feed can keep up with the flex for the most part and it is far easier to write with than my much more expensive Namiki Falcon extra-fine with flex added by John Motishaw’s crew (though it can’t do those wonderful hairlines). With both pens, if I want to get flex for any length of time I keep an open bottle at hand and treat it as a fountain/dip hybrid. This avoids the railroading problem and saves me frustration.


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#52 Jamerelbe

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Posted 12 December 2019 - 11:20

For anyone who's interested, here's a (poorly photographed) writing sample of one of my V2 Himalayas, with an FPR "F" nib installed - quite a different writing experience from the ultraflex nib! [Not better, not worse, just... different.]

 

mjcmElF.jpg



#53 peroride

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 07:12

The solution to pollution is dilution

 

It writes! pages and pages non-stop :P 

fpn_1576220105__fpr_writeon.jpg

Not sure how  :huh: but I did this:

  • 3 flushings - my last resort would have been pen flush before the toothbrush
  • I twisted the nib back to its original slight misalignment with the feed 
  • Runny diluted ink of Noodler's 54th Mass + Platinum Carbon Black + water
Turns out my converter is leaky :unsure: and I don't know where - whether at piston knob or section juncture ?!?! :( but every refill equaled inky fingers and confirmed with ink in the barrel
 
Good thing I bought a spare; should have bought more! Handling the Boston safety is white glove clean in comparison ;)
 
Thank you all again for posting your observations and good tips! :bunny01:
fpn_1576220135__leaky.jpg


#54 Jamerelbe

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 13:44

My latest experiment: removing the ultraflex nib from one my V2s (which was surprisingly easy - the nib came out without needing to pull the feed as well), and replacing it with a JoWo nib.  I wanted to try a stub nib, and the only one I had on hand was a two-toned Goulet nib.  You'll be pleased to know it seated perfectly, fit snugly, and wrote beautifully (well, as beautifully as my handwriting permits, when I'm trying to do things in a rush!). 

 

Enjoy (or otherwise):

 

7Rh9DFU.jpg



#55 Intensity

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 16:48

I got a vintage Pelikan CN nib for my 5.5 Himalaya, upon Honeybadgers' recommendation.  Looking forward to using that.  Even though my v1. #6 Himalaya ultraflex nib / feed never worked quite right for flexing -- too much railroading, but I haven't yet tried heat setting -- the nib works very well for plain writing, being more EF than F already.  So I'm keeping it as is for now.  I think in the future I'll still go with #5.5 Himalaya: both for nib swap options with vintage nibs and for smaller (shorter) nib size in general.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: fountain pen revolution, himalaya, acrylic, indian fountain pens, ultraflex steel nibs



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