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Fountain Pen Revolution Release A ‘Himalaya V2’

fountain pen revolution himalaya acrylic indian fountain pens ultraflex steel nibs

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62 replies to this topic

#21 TruthPil

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:04

"Much as I enjoy my older models, I wish I could trade them in for the new.  "

 

That's what I was afraid you'd say....but thanks so much for the detailed review! The amethyst and jade look especially good to me.


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#22 Jamerelbe

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:34

"Much as I enjoy my older models, I wish I could trade them in for the new.  "

 

That's what I was afraid you'd say....but thanks so much for the detailed review! The amethyst and jade look especially good to me.

 

I do still like the older ones though  B) - it's just that I really *really* like their #6 nibs!



#23 Intensity

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:37

I do hope they will keep the #5.5 model around though and don't phase it out.  I think it's sufficiently different in terms of writing experience to warrant its availability.  Otherwise I'll have to stock up.  In my experience, there's not a greater line variation with #6 nibs compared to #5.5 nibs--it seems about the same with the nibs I've had: 2 5.5 and 2 #6--the original non-EF ultraflex.  I've had a lot of railroading with my #6 pen and almost none with #5.5, but I might need to tweak the feed in #6.


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#24 Jamerelbe

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:50

I do hope they will keep the #5.5 model around though and don't phase it out.  I think it's sufficiently different in terms of writing experience to warrant its availability.  Otherwise I'll have to stock up.  In my experience, there's not a greater line variation with #6 nibs compared to #5.5 nibs--it seems about the same with the nibs I've had: 2 5.5 and 2 #6--the original non-EF ultraflex.  I've had a lot of railroading with my #6 pen and almost none with #5.5, but I might need to tweak the feed in #6.

 

I'm pretty sure they intend to keep both in their lineup - that's the impression I got from my interactions with the proprietor. As long as both sell well, there's no real reason to stop stocking them.  



#25 Honeybadgers

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 06:14

I have both now in ebonite and an acrylic 5.5. I prefer the 5.5, since it can take vintage nibs. My 5.5 V1 has the feed from an old eversharp and the XXF semiflex steel nib from a pelikan C100. And it is glorious. Wet, smooth, crisp, soft, comfortable.


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#26 g33klibrarian

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 17:04

I have both now in ebonite and an acrylic 5.5. I prefer the 5.5, since it can take vintage nibs. My 5.5 V1 has the feed from an old eversharp and the XXF semiflex steel nib from a pelikan C100. And it is glorious. Wet, smooth, crisp, soft, comfortable.

 

Did you discover the sizes fit by trial and error or are there certain manufacturers commonly use that size of nib and feed?

 

Appreciate y'all's replies on my previous questions!



#27 Honeybadgers

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 08:04

 

Did you discover the sizes fit by trial and error or are there certain manufacturers commonly use that size of nib and feed?

 

Appreciate y'all's replies on my previous questions!

 

The #5.5 is a common size for vintage pens. it's about a #2, some #1's will fit, but since they're friction fit designs, there are a huge variety of nibs and feeds that fit. I just used the eversharp feed because I thought it was pretty and had a spare, it was just a standard #2. The C100 nib would easily fit the factory feed as well. 

 

The 100 nibs can be bought here for $25. This is the seller I used. I bought two XXF's and they write stunningly. Soft for steel nibs but snappy and responsive, very thin and very wet, very precise lines.

 

https://www.ebay.com...872.m2749.l2649


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#28 Intensity

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 17:09

 

The #5.5 is a common size for vintage pens. it's about a #2, some #1's will fit, but since they're friction fit designs, there are a huge variety of nibs and feeds that fit. I just used the eversharp feed because I thought it was pretty and had a spare, it was just a standard #2. The C100 nib would easily fit the factory feed as well. 

 

The 100 nibs can be bought here for $25. This is the seller I used. I bought two XXF's and they write stunningly. Soft for steel nibs but snappy and responsive, very thin and very wet, very precise lines.

 

https://www.ebay.com...872.m2749.l2649

 

Do you have any writing samples to show with the XXF?  I wonder how that would compare to Japanese Extra Fine range.


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#29 Jamerelbe

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 22:00

 

Did you discover the sizes fit by trial and error or are there certain manufacturers commonly use that size of nib and feed?

 

Appreciate y'all's replies on my previous questions!

 

I haven't tried vintage nibs on my Himalayas (I don't really have any!), but find they're pretty 'forgiving' when it comes to fitting other #5 nibs.  Because the ebonite feed doesn't have funny notches or deviations in shape to accommodate a specific kind of nib - and the grip section likewise isn't notched - you can ram a wider variety of nibs in and get them to seat well.  I really like using the older Himalayas with some JoWo #5 Arrow nibs I picked up from fpnibs.com - they look a little different (in a good way!), and write far wetter in the Himalaya than in their original nib assemblies, fitted to another pen.

 

Edited to add: I haven't experimented yet with the #6 or V2 Himalayas, but the Trivenis (which have a plastic feed) happily take JoWo or Bock #6 nibs, and I'm confident the Himalayas would too!


Edited by Jamerelbe, 02 December 2019 - 22:01.


#30 Mongoosey

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Posted 02 December 2019 - 22:25

The pens may have some variation.

 

#5 Jowo's fit pretty well in my Himalaya-Original.

 

#6 Jowo's were loose in my Triveni Jr....

 

But I found Knox nibs to fit securely if the Jowo's were a little loose.  I guess the Knox's may be a little thicker in the back or something.

 

I haven't tried Bock nibs.



#31 Jamerelbe

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 04:04

The pens may have some variation.
 
#5 Jowo's fit pretty well in my Himalaya-Original.
 
#6 Jowo's were loose in my Triveni Jr....
 
But I found Knox nibs to fit securely if the Jowo's were a little loose.  I guess the Knox's may be a little thicker in the back or something.
 
I haven't tried Bock nibs.


I think I agree with you: JoWo nibs are a slightly looser fit in the Triveni, because of the shape of the nib assembly sleeve. It hasn't bothered me with the 1.1mm stub nib I have in my red ebonite Triveni, but I wouldn't try it with a finer nib. Then again, the EF and F nibs from FPR are so pleasant to write with, in not sure why you'd bother!

#32 TruthPil

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:40

I have both now in ebonite and an acrylic 5.5. I prefer the 5.5, since it can take vintage nibs. My 5.5 V1 has the feed from an old eversharp and the XXF semiflex steel nib from a pelikan C100. And it is glorious. Wet, smooth, crisp, soft, comfortable.

 

+1 for the nice ability to swap vintage nibs in the V1.

My first V1 Himalaya is currently sporting a 1950s wet noodle Degussa nib AND feed I got out of an otherwise ruined Artus. My only problem is that the converter only has enough room to hold enough ink to write a page or two with that paintbrush wet nib.


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#33 Honeybadgers

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 10:53

 

Do you have any writing samples to show with the XXF?  I wonder how that would compare to Japanese Extra Fine range.

 

Dead nuts even with a japanese EF.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#34 Jamerelbe

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 12:59

I pulled apart a couple of my Himalayas to clean them last night (wanted to get the pigment ink out of the Jade Smoke pen before it clogged it up!), and thought I'd take a pic for prosperity.  

 

The top feed and grip come from the V2 - note the longer feed, to try and reduce the gap between feed and ink reservoir.

The lower grip and feed come from the gold-trim #6 version (which takes the old plunger-style ink reservoir).

 

fpn_1575377671__himalaya_section-feed.jp

 

I accidentally mixed the nibs up: the gold nib 'belongs' with the purple grip section, and the stainless steel with the jade smoke. [Yes, you can swap them, but they're supposed to match the trim of the pen.]

 

Note too the "EF" on the stainless steel nib - this is hidden within the section when the nib is deployed.  I have to fill both pens with the same ink, if I want to more accurately compare the thickness of the lines they lay down - both of them flex really nicely though!



#35 Jamerelbe

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 13:00

And yes, the upper feed still needs more of a soaking (and maybe a light scrub?) - I don't think I'll be putting that particular ink in this particular pen again...



#36 Intensity

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 14:14

Which ink, if you dont mind sharing?

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#37 Jamerelbe

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 21:45

Which ink, if you dont mind sharing?

 

Kakimori Blue Moment - a pigment ink I bought from milligram.com, but made by a Japanese stationery store (I think?).  

 

The little instruction sheet they include in the box says, among other things:

 

"This ink is a pigment type of ink... We recommend to use the pen filled with the ink constantly so that the ink will not dry on the nib... Only the pens sold at our stores have been tested with the ink. Depending on your pen, the ink may possibly clog up the feed, and it would be problems with the pen."

 

I like to live dangerously from time to time, or I wouldn't have bought the ink int the first place - for now, though, I think I'll be putting this in a cheaper pen.  It hasn't seriously damaged the feed, but it *is* proving a little reluctant to dissolve away.  Might put it in my ultrasonic cleaner later, and/or have a go at it with an old toothbrush...



#38 Intensity

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 21:56

Ohh ok, wasnt sure if you were referring to the more widely known pigment inks, such as those made by Platinum.

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#39 Jamerelbe

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 22:00

Ohh ok, wasnt sure if you were referring to the more widely known pigment inks, such as those made by Platinum.

 

No, this is definitely a 'boutique' ink, so I was half-expecting problems.  I have a few pigment inks from Blackstone (Barrister Black, Blue, and Blue-Black), all of which seem to behave more nicely than this.  You *can* expect sedimentation from *any* of these inks, though, if you leave them in your pen long enough - and at least with the Himalaya you can strip the pen down to clean it out!



#40 A Smug Dill

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 02:57

I like to live dangerously from time to time, or I wouldn't have bought the ink int the first place - for now, though, I think I'll be putting this in a cheaper pen.  It hasn't seriously damaged the feed, but it *is* proving a little reluctant to dissolve away.

 

 

Or just go straight to something like a Platinum #3776 Century or gold-nibbed Sailor pen, both categories of pens that are extremely reliable in not letting ink evaporate when properly capped. :)


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: fountain pen revolution, himalaya, acrylic, indian fountain pens, ultraflex steel nibs



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