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Fascinating Tool...

repair tools disassembly

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6 replies to this topic

#1 PJohnP

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 21:27

I saw a rather interesting tool on eBay for disassembling Pelikans :

 

https://www.ebay.com...ecAAOSw-s5dx8Id

 

I cannot comment whether this is the appropriate tool to use compared with some of the knockout block assemblies that we've seen over the years, but I was fascinated with the video.  It appears from the video that the barrel screws into the tool, so as to retain it when the piston assembly is being removed.  Part of the tool appears to be wood, part steel.  Pretty obviously, this is only valid for certain models of Pelikan (and is so noted within the ad, "Tool for disassembling Pelikan 120, 140, M400, M200"), but it did seem to be a solution that could allow for a modest amount of force instead of a solid whack to the piston assembly.

 

US$65 (including shipping) is a bit steep for me to entertain this just to play with it, not forgetting that I do not pretend to be a pen engineer/repairer !  Still...

 

 

 

John P.



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#2 Ron Z

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 22:37

Many comments come to mind.  Let me distill them down to this:  No.

 

Was this designed by Wiley E. Coyote?


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#3 Freddy

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 22:44

Many comments come to mind.  Let me distill them down to this:  No.

 

Was this designed by Wiley E. Coyote?

With help and guidance from  Rube Goldberg.....

 

      Fred



#4 Seney724

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 01:53

There is a recent, excellent & informative thread on this topic here:

http://www.fountainp...on-removal-rod/

 

Included is a terrific (as always) contribution by "fountainbel."  :thumbup:



#5 Ron Z

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 02:09

There is a vast difference between the tool on Ebay, and Francis tool, as I would expect.  Francis has much greater control, and can feel what's going on.  The pressure is applied gradually and slowly.   Notice that he uses the word gently in his description.  I don't think that's the case with the caulk gun version.


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#6 PJohnP

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 03:23

There is a vast difference between the tool on Ebay, and Francis tool, as I would expect.  Francis has much greater control, and can feel what's going on.  The pressure is applied gradually and slowly.   Notice that he uses the word gently in his description.  I don't think that's the case with the caulk gun version.

 

Ron :

 

 

Fair points, although I think that one could apply a more gentle force with this than the sharp rapping that I've seen used a few times at pen shows to displace the piston.

 

Having noted that, I can see that there would be some other mechanisms to provide a more graduated action than a caulking gun.  Without question, Francis' tool is a more elegant approach to the problem.  I also note that Francis counsels heating the barrel to approximately 50° C which would pose other problems for the casual pen repairer.

 

And that term, "casual pen repairer", is a pretty important one !  There are some tasks that are so simple and straightforward that a novice can apply them without risk, but there are many others that have steep learning curves in terms of the potential for damaging or destroying a pen.  Discerning that point is the difference between enjoying one's pens or losing them...

 

 

 

John P.



#7 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 11:01

Rube Goldberg, was the greatest engineer of all time! ****

Every 'drawing' actually worked.

Some collage somewhere went though all his convoluted cartoon ways of getting something done.

 

***Not necessarily the best, in one is supposed to build on the generation before to make it simpler,......or cheaper. :( ....or even better. :rolleyes:

 

I don't think the rumor he worked for Audi is correct. :wacko:


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: repair, tools, disassembly



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