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Pliers: Time To Start Learning Some Basic Nib Straightening Work.


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29 replies to this topic

#21 ac12

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 05:07

OK

Their "pliers" are not needle nose pliers from the hardware store, they are most likely specialty tools.

Example, take a look at the tools at "pen tooling."

https://pentooling.com/pliers.html

On a hardware store plier with teeth, the teeth will imprint/mar the nib.  You need a plier without teeth, or at least be padded enough that the teeth won't mar the nib.

A plier allows the skilled tech to do easier and faster what would be done with the fingers.

Again, a plier magnifies leverage and eliminates feedback.  So you REALLY have to know what you are doing.

That is the same reason I do NOT recommend newbies use a "section plier."  It is too easy to break the barrel or completely shear a pen in half.

 

The tool you did not mention is a nib block.

For hobby use, get the affordable $30 acrylic nib block, not the EXPENSIVE $200+ metal nib blocks.

Burnishers are DiY or commercial.  If you look creatively at some kitchen utensils, you can use some of them as burnishers.

You have to PRACTICE A LOT, to learn how to use a nib block to straighten a nib.  There is a lot of learn by trial and error.


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#22 eachan

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 14:11

A plier is someone who plies a trade.  The singular of the tool is pliers.

 

For nib straightening, when fingers alone are not sufficient my default is the nib block and burnisher.  Burnishers, of course, must be as smooth as the block.  Penpractice provides an excellent kit

 

http://www.penpractice.com/page3.html

 

I use pliers - the round-nose type - only to reduce severe crumpling before using the nib block.


Regards,

Eachan


#23 Freddy

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 15:46

...........There is a divine beauty in learning..............

...........To learn means to accept.........................

 

I have learned a lot from this thread......................

     Thanks.........

  Fred



#24 eharriett

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 23:13

OK

Their "pliers" are not needle nose pliers from the hardware store, they are most likely specialty tools.

Example, take a look at the tools at "pen tooling."

https://pentooling.com/pliers.html

On a hardware store plier with teeth, the teeth will imprint/mar the nib.  You need a plier without teeth, or at least be padded enough that the teeth won't mar the nib.

A plier allows the skilled tech to do easier and faster what would be done with the fingers.

Again, a plier magnifies leverage and eliminates feedback.  So you REALLY have to know what you are doing.

That is the same reason I do NOT recommend newbies use a "section plier."  It is too easy to break the barrel or completely shear a pen in half.

 

The tool you did not mention is a nib block.

For hobby use, get the affordable $30 acrylic nib block, not the EXPENSIVE $200+ metal nib blocks.

Burnishers are DiY or commercial.  If you look creatively at some kitchen utensils, you can use some of them as burnishers.

You have to PRACTICE A LOT, to learn how to use a nib block to straighten a nib.  There is a lot of learn by trial and error.

 

 

Thank you.  That is helpful.  And that is what I'm looking to learn.  I'll get one of the blocks, too.

 

And thank you too for the explanation.  I do want to learn.



#25 JonSzanto

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 00:36

For nib straightening, when fingers alone are not sufficient my default is the nib block and burnisher.  Burnishers, of course, must be as smooth as the block.  Penpractice provides an excellent kit

 

http://www.penpractice.com/page3.html

 

I use pliers - the round-nose type - only to reduce severe crumpling before using the nib block.

 

Thank you, thank you, thank you. I was wondering if nib blocks and burnishing tools was ever going to be mentioned in the thread. The thought of pliers on a nib is pretty horrifying


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#26 Larry Barrieau

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 00:23

Is there a video out there which explains the basics?


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#27 ac12

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 17:41

Is there a video out there which explains the basics?

 

Of what?


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#28 FarmBoy

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 19:38

 

Of what?

unbending nibs


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#29 Vintagepens

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 22:24

Is there a video out there which explains the basics?

 

http://vintagepensbl...eos-on-nib.html



#30 eckiethump

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 05:42

The only way to learn, is by damaging pens/nibs, why do think the repairers have so much stock?
Nibs, a knowledge of metallurgy is an asset, easily learned, a lifetime to master in nib work.
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge (Charles Darwin)

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