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Organics Studio Nitrogen

nitrogen organics studio

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25 replies to this topic

#21 TSherbs

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 14:22

 

Says something about the QC and consistency of OS inks...

 

Or it says something else. Not enough data points here for me to make a reliable determination. 



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#22 TSherbs

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 14:39

 

https://kencrooker.com/igink-redux/

 

OS have never been known for good QC.

 

In terms of the conclusions that one can reliably draw from this "experiment," I don't know what to say. The actual pH of the ink was not measured, no test with a more neutral pH Iron gall ink from the same manufacturer and/or others was tested, and no close-up "before" photos of the nibs were posted for actual equal comparisons for before and after. Each time I looked for something more rigorous in the set up of the experiment, I did not find it. But yes, something seems to have appeared to have corroded these nibs. What is doing it, and why, is not really answered here. And whether the problem exists beyond this one sample of one ink is not clear either. So to conclude something broader about OS QC seems not yet justified. Technically. 



#23 Honeybadgers

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 22:44

 

In terms of the conclusions that one can reliably draw from this "experiment," I don't know what to say. The actual pH of the ink was not measured, no test with a more neutral pH Iron gall ink from the same manufacturer and/or others was tested, and no close-up "before" photos of the nibs were posted for actual equal comparisons for before and after. Each time I looked for something more rigorous in the set up of the experiment, I did not find it. But yes, something seems to have appeared to have corroded these nibs. What is doing it, and why, is not really answered here. And whether the problem exists beyond this one sample of one ink is not clear either. So to conclude something broader about OS QC seems not yet justified. Technically. 

 

 

Agree with this. There was no control, no alternative inks or other fluids, no touching of the ink to some litmus paper, no chemical analysis...

 

I can't wait until I get into my higher level chem classes. Y'all are going to see so much chemistry on this damn website.


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#24 TommyLo

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 19:06

I like it when it works but it really does dry out easily.  Even diluted 20% I still have problems with it.  I'm assuming you're supposed to shake it before filling pens.



#25 chromantic

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 01:38

I'm running 35-40% and find that a marked improvement (still some hard-starting if I uncap but don't immediately touch the nib to paper or pause too long). As far as I know, only shimmer inks need to be shaken.


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#26 Honeybadgers

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 08:24

I like it when it works but it really does dry out easily.  Even diluted 20% I still have problems with it.  I'm assuming you're supposed to shake it before filling pens.

 

I think all inks, to a tiny degree, are not 100% perfect solutions. I "shake" (chemistry kind of "shake", which means just invert the bottle 2-4 times) every bottle of ink I have before filling, because I doubt any degree is a perfect suspension.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)






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