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Fpr #5.5 Nib Will Fit On M200 Nib Unit

pelikan m200; fpr

8 replies to this topic

#1 Ink Sandwich

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 18:00

Hey guys,

 

I just thought I'd share this.

 

Yesterday, I got a package from Fountain Pen Revolution, containing a FPR Guru with a flex nib and a spare #5.5 EF nib. The shape and curavture of the nib looked fairly close to the M200 EF nib, which I've always found way too broad. So I attempted to replace the Pelikan with the FPR nib and - voila! It works!

 

FPR #5.5 nibs will fit on the Pelikan M200 nib unit!

 

Of course. getting the nib out of its unit (and getting it back in) is a bit of a hassle, but it actually works. I haven't tried it with the flex nib yet, so I can't tell if the ink flow keeps up etc., but the normal steel nib works like a charm.



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#2 carlos.q

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 19:42

That is very interesting! However you must remember the unwritten rule of this forum: "Pictures or it didn't happen!"   ;)



#3 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 19:56

M200 EF nib, which I've always found way too broad.""""

 

Then you shouldn't be buying anything but Japanese. Pelikan EF In the 200, is semi-vintage, vintage narrow...........it is half a width narrower than a  fat and blobby modern 400/600/800/1000 nib.

 

Japanese are designed for tiny printed script. So are marked one size too small....to those who started with western nibs.

Western nibs are designed for flowing cursive pens. And are marked sizes too small in they write much wider than folks who started with Japanese pens seem to want to understand.

Western pens were using those @ width before Japan started making fountain pens in 1912.

Japanese pens started becoming main stream @ 2000 give or take.

 

So the Pelikan EF should be close to one of the fatter by reputation Sailor nibs in F.

XXF = Japanese EF............and if Pelikan EF is way too wide.................what are you going to do if you buy a real wide, fat and blobby EF in modern gold Pelikan nibs, or known to be wide even in Euro pens MB, or Lamy?

 

Suggest you sell you fat Pelikan EF...in Pelikan don't make XXF or XXXF....needle point....and it would cost more than it is worth to have someone grind all your Pelikan nibs to XXXF that you prefer.

 

You knew it would be fatter than Japanese when you bought it.

 

If you were to get a reasonable with Pelikan nib F or M, I'd tell you about shading inks.....which don't shade on spiderweb and baby spiderweb width nibs.

 

Some folks for no reason I can understand take great pride in writing smaller than even a teacher can read..............paper is not all that expensive; even good paper.

Missing the Golden Age of Ink....with an XXF and XXXF nib.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 22 August 2019 - 19:58.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#4 Ink Sandwich

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:03

M200 EF nib, which I've always found way too broad.""""

 

Then you shouldn't be buying anything but Japanese. Pelikan EF In the 200, is semi-vintage, vintage narrow...........it is half a width narrower than a  fat and blobby modern 400/600/800/1000 nib.

 

Japanese are designed for tiny printed script. So are marked one size too small....to those who started with western nibs.

Western nibs are designed for flowing cursive pens. And are marked sizes too small in they write much wider than folks who started with Japanese pens seem to want to understand.

Western pens were using those @ width before Japan started making fountain pens in 1912.

Japanese pens started becoming main stream @ 2000 give or take.

 

So the Pelikan EF should be close to one of the fatter by reputation Sailor nibs in F.

XXF = Japanese EF............and if Pelikan EF is way too wide.................what are you going to do if you buy a real wide, fat and blobby EF in modern gold Pelikan nibs, or known to be wide even in Euro pens MB, or Lamy?

 

Suggest you sell you fat Pelikan EF...in Pelikan don't make XXF or XXXF....needle point....and it would cost more than it is worth to have someone grind all your Pelikan nibs to XXXF that you prefer.

 

You knew it would be fatter than Japanese when you bought it.

 

If you were to get a reasonable with Pelikan nib F or M, I'd tell you about shading inks.....which don't shade on spiderweb and baby spiderweb width nibs.

 

Some folks for no reason I can understand take great pride in writing smaller than even a teacher can read..............paper is not all that expensive; even good paper.

Missing the Golden Age of Ink....with an XXF and XXXF nib.

 

 

Thanks for your thoughts on the matter, even though I'd say this is slightly off topic. But since you've taken the time to write, I'll take mine to give my 2c on the matter.

 

First of all, I've used fountain pens for almost 30 years, starting as a school kid. When I got to high school, I got a Pelikan M75, and I can tell you, even the M on this one is finer than today's EF nibs. The funny thing is, I've actually bought a couple of EF nibs for my Pelikans, and they were all more or less disappointing out of the box, mostly because they were misaligned on the feed, the tines or other things. The F inb I'm using on my other M200 is pretty good actully, smooth, with a decent flow (given the right ink, of course) - and funnily enough, it's a tad finer than the EF nibs I've tried so far. Maybe it's that Pelikan has trouble with the EF nibs especially, I don't know. From since I was a school kid, I'm just used to write with nibs that are finer than what is common in these kinds of pens.

 

And yes - my daily writers these days are almost exclusively Japanese, because they write with a finer line and because in my impression, they have better quality control. My M200 grenn marble is a gorgeous pen, the piston is smooth, I like the feel and size of it - basically everything but the nib. That's why I grab my Pilot Metropolitan F most of the time. It's a nice no frills pen but a decent, reliable writer. 

 

I also don't think that as far as scripts are concerned, Japanese pens are suited less (or German pens more) for western writing. I like to practice my handwriting on French ruled paper, and the 2mm size is about the x height of my normal handwriting. It's good 90g smooth Clairefontaine paper, not very absorbent. Yet anything above a Western F nib makes the writing look doughy - 

.I've been learning Japanese for a couple of years and try to do it whenever I have the chance, so my Japanese pens do come in handy - something I can't say about any Chinese pen I've ever owned). My Japanese pens work for both Asian and Western writing, while my Western pens only work for the latter.

 

As for school - from my experience as a teacher, what makes handwriting difficult to read is not kids writing too small, but using pens that are too bold for their handwriting, which make it less pronounced in some cases, in others an indistinguishable mess. - On that note, since I have to do a lot of writing (mostly in the form of correction), I wouldn't want to write with anything but an fountain pen. But since schools usually use low-grade, very absorbent paper, using broad nibs would make matters worse, so that's a nother reason why I like fine nibs. 

 

Broad nibs can be a lot of fun and a joy to write with, no doubt. I just find them impractical for the kind of writing I like and / or have to do. What it comes down to I guess is that I'd wish the nib sizes were more distinct to suit a wider range of preferences. 


Edited by Ink Sandwich, 22 August 2019 - 21:04.


#5 TSherbs

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:25

Hey guys,
 
FPR #5.5 nibs will fit on the Pelikan M200 nib unit!
 


Excellent. Thank you for sharing.

#6 Karmachanic

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:34

delete


Edited by Karmachanic, 22 August 2019 - 21:55.

"Want little. Need less. Love more."


#7 Karmachanic

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:39

Try again.

Apparently the FPR 5.5 is actually a #5. TWSBI 530 is also a #5.

http://www.fountainp...-a-pelikan-nib/


"Want little. Need less. Love more."


#8 Ink Sandwich

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 21:40

Apparently the FPR #5,5 is in actuality a #5. TWSBI 530 takes a #5.

http://www.fountainp...ikan-nib/page-2

 

Great to know - thanks for the info! :)



#9 Honeybadgers

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:45

Good to know, but I honestly think the M200's EF is honestly fairly flexible all on its own, lol.

 

And If I want a real flexy nib, the vintage M400 nibs are relatively common, nice and flexible, and direct screw-in replacements. I have an M400 BB semiflex italic that just sings. And only cost me like $80 for the whole working pen.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)




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