Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Praise To Pelikan 400 Tortoise

pelikan 400 tortoise km nib

  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21 LyaT

LyaT

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location:Dublin

Posted 01 August 2019 - 17:56

 
Your pen is really nice, congratulations!  Iridescent vintage pens can really be beautiful -- I have a Waterman Stalwart that does amazing things as I roll the barrel in the light.  My only Pelikan brown tortoises are a 1980s M400, and an M101N.
 
Are you sure that the nib is a Kugel?  It looks to me like an oblique, including the little "" stamped into it.


Thanks! I cannot stop admiring the pen. The tortoise shell is really gorgeous. The color is bright and deep at the same time.

It is a Kugel, I could see the little ball like bump on the tipping, but the ball is not on the bottom where the tipping touches the paper. It matches the description I read in a much older post here.

The o mark on a script nib does not necessarily mean oblique. I must have read it on pelikan perch or pelikan collectibles, cannot recall the link now.

Sponsored Content

#22 LyaT

LyaT

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location:Dublin

Posted 01 August 2019 - 18:00

That's a really nice looking pen. The K-type nibs were a "ball" for their time, but not really much of a "ball" tip by today's standards. I like the K-series nibs too - I have KFs on my 140s and they're just the right balance of both round and vintage in a tip for me.


Oh yes, the balance between smooth writing and stubbish feeling is very satisfying. I only heard about KF and KM, wonder if KB and KBB exist too.

#23 LyaT

LyaT

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location:Dublin

Posted 01 August 2019 - 18:32

Let me try to describe the M101n nib vs 400, since Bo Bo asked.

In my opinion, M101n script nib is a modern attempt of semi-flex, but with a big ball tip. I had the pen grind to cursive italic, from a plain M. On demand, I could flex the nib to B+ width, not as much as the 400 KMs semi-flex, but certainly much more than the regular flex M200.

However, the M101n nib is too soft to my taste. It is not springy like M200 or bouncy like vintage gold nib, just soft. I am often afraid of writing it flex, in fear of damaging the nib. Maybe it is because modern gold nibs have thinner gold than vintage?

To be fair, M101n nib has its character. It is better than M400 M nib.

#24 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,435 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 02 August 2019 - 08:06

Thanks for the info....but luckily I'm spoiled with vintage semi-flex nibs...but still like the pen's looks.

 

 

The K nibs of the '50-70's and perhaps before, were stubs on the bottom, just in case you wanted to hold a fountain pen like a fountain pen and not like a pencil or one of those newfangled ball points.

I find the K nibs do write wider due to a fatter tip; something I'd not noticed originally. I have two KM nibs.

 

My post war 100n has only a k on the nib, and I eyeball it as KEF....in there is no marking on the pen or the nib other than the little k. When held up sideways, it is a kugel nib.

 

Someone mentioned I don't think on this thread, that questioned if the 100/100n/Ibis nibs swap nibs with the 400/140/120 and later 600. They don't. The three longitudinal comb feed nibs are different in threading from the four longitudinal or later horizontal comb nibs.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 02 August 2019 - 08:21.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#25 LyaT

LyaT

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location:Dublin

Posted 02 August 2019 - 14:38

I have read about KEF, KF, KM, but they seem to stop at KM. Never heard of KB.

IMO KM writes narrower than my 400nn M. I have toffee brown in KM and 4001 blue in M, the inks are about the same dryness.

#26 Ray-Vigo

Ray-Vigo

    Parts Bin Digger

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,702 posts
  • Location:Connecticut
  • Flag:

Posted 02 August 2019 - 18:40

Thanks for the info....but luckily I'm spoiled with vintage semi-flex nibs...but still like the pen's looks.

 

 

The K nibs of the '50-70's and perhaps before, were stubs on the bottom, just in case you wanted to hold a fountain pen like a fountain pen and not like a pencil or one of those newfangled ball points.

I find the K nibs do write wider due to a fatter tip; something I'd not noticed originally. I have two KM nibs.

 

My post war 100n has only a k on the nib, and I eyeball it as KEF....in there is no marking on the pen or the nib other than the little k. When held up sideways, it is a kugel nib.

 

Someone mentioned I don't think on this thread, that questioned if the 100/100n/Ibis nibs swap nibs with the 400/140/120 and later 600. They don't. The three longitudinal comb feed nibs are different in threading from the four longitudinal or later horizontal comb nibs.

 

This is a helpful explanation - I can feel how the K differs from a modern "ball tip nib", but it also differs from my vintage Pelikan standard "M" tips. I also appreciate the nib swap information - I'd love to own an Ibis with a K-series nib some day. The one I have is rigid and very fine (has a "+" mark on it). I think I like the KM or KF better.



#27 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,435 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 02 August 2019 - 20:38

The Ibis I have is a maxi-semi-flex.....and there seem to be few Ibis owners or few who speak about the nibs.

I was very surprised when I put the Ibis nib to my thumb when checking out a lot in a live auction that it was a maxi-semi-flex.

I normally take a semi-flex pen with me when checking out old pens at German live auctions.

 

So I am wrong with my assumption an Ibis had a semi flex or + nib.

Oh, well.....win some, lose some and some one shouldn't have played.

 

Never got around to getting a Rappen.

 

+ mark for nail??? Have to find out when Pelikan started marking it's ridged nibs H or D.

I do have a '50-54 400 with a D nib....a nails Nail, something to take with you if you climb the North Wall of the Eiger or need to open up someone's main battle tank.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#28 Oobly

Oobly

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 August 2019 - 20:14

I never thought I could love a brown pen... until I discovered the vintage Pelikan Brown Tortoise. They have a warmth and character that really appeals to me. And of course also have all the other characteristics of a vintage Pelikan that I love: large ink capacity, elegant and sophisticated without being too showy / blingy, amazing nib (especially the pre 1954 "script" nibs) and feed, excellent size, weight and balance for my hand. There's always at least one of my tortoise pens with me in my "everyday carry" selection.

Attached Images

  • BT_collection.jpg


#29 mana

mana

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,128 posts
  • Location:Helsinki, Finland
  • Flag:

Posted 09 August 2019 - 23:27

Wow! 400 & 400NN Tortoise are awesome (have a set of 400/N/NN and then some) and always room for more ;) I have known that you like vintage Pelikans for a while but that collection is really cool! Hope to see you at the Helsinki Pelikan Hub, if you didnt register please let me know if you are coming (I am the Hub Master).

Adopt, Don't Shop! Support Your Local Animal Shelters! - Let's make this world a better place together! Because... now is the only thing that is real...

"Indifference towards people and the reality in which they live is actually the one and only cardinal sin in design." - Dieter Rams
 

EDC: Post WWII green binde Pelikan 100N CI 14K B, Blue Marbled M200 F, 400NN Tortoise CI 14K BB. INKED: early 70s LAMY 2000 MK, Parker 51 Aerometric F & M, rOtring Art Pen 1.1 & Woodshed Pen Co. Red swirl 1.1 mm CI, Kaweco V12 14K B and then some... Inks: Pelikan 4001 BB & Turquoise, vintage Parker Quink, Lamy Turquoise, Diamine Eau de Nil, Sailor Souboku etc.


#30 LyaT

LyaT

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location:Dublin

Posted 10 August 2019 - 20:37

Wow, thanks for showing us your collection! They look so nice altogether. Every one looks different. You got green, brown, and orange shades there. Beautiful!

Do you find your script nibs making more sound in writing, and more feedback, than the bird ones?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pelikan, 400, tortoise, km nib



Sponsored Content




|