Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

What Makes The Montblanc 149 Special Other Than Its Size?

montblanc

  • Please log in to reply
132 replies to this topic

#21 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,208 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 21 July 2019 - 14:47

For a very long time...1950 until the 1000;  or other oversized pens came out with in the last few years, the 149 was the only oversized pen.

 

I'm not a fan of oversized pens, I got my 1005  because I got a real deal at a live auction.....actually I don't even chase Large pens........prefer the better balanced medium-large '50-60's 146 over the 1970 to now, Large 146.

 

A bit more than a decade ago, MB was the most hated pen on the com....even the inks were hated, only because they were MB. No...in many folks knew power mad jerks flaunting their snowflake, the bigger the better. The Status Signature Pen....

 

Well, the 146 even the modern Large one is lighter and more nimble than the 800; can even be posted.

I did try a 149 out a decade ago at my B&M, it was too big for me. However the un-posted 149 may well be more nimble than an un-posted 1000,

 

I don't care enough to take my 1005 to my B&M to find out...................and If So, then only the 149 semi/maxi-semi-flex nib of the '50-70 era.

I have a maxi-semi-flex nibbed medium large 146 ( better balanced than the later Large 146).

You if you hunt at the right places you could get a maxi-semi-flex instead of a semi-flex in your vintage 149.

 

Will need a repairman who understands the telescopic MB piston of the era. But that era's nib is worth it.

I use Fountainble for telescope piston repair or re-corking of my '50's MB's.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


Sponsored Content

#22 Marlow

Marlow

    Happily ink-stained

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 785 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 15:07

Whilst I think they usually cost too much for my liking (and budget!), I think it would be a mistake to think of every 149 with an F-nib, for example, as being the same as every other. If you look at the 149 identification guide on the MB sub-forum you can see how much the pens vary according to production date and even within those production dates you can expect variations. The modern 149's I would not be willing to shell out for unless I found one at £200 or less because I know for a certainty that I can find, and, indeed, already possess, large, classy-looking superbly made pens with excellent nibs for that figure or less.

 

If I turn my thoughts to the celluloid 149s, however, I know they are a different beast in terms of tactility in the hand, technical fascination of the filling mechanism and potential for an incredible semi-flex nib. Unfortunately, with the cost of a 'silver rings' in the £1500+ range nowadays they are way out of my league so the discussion is purely academic for me. For those that can permit themselves such luxuries, however, I can absolutely understand the appeal of the right 149.

 

A 149 would never be a grail pen for me as I don't like the shape at that size of pen  (I DO like the shape at a 144-146 size) from an aesthetic standpoint though I cannot deny they are very well balanced in use.

 

In summary, my opinion is that they are not all alike, modern versions are way overpriced (as are almost all modern pens in my view) and the sexier vintage versions are out of my reach so I will never own one unless I find a 'sumgai'. As to the question of 'prestige', I only care about that insofar as it increases the likelihood of making a profit on one IF I find it at a great price.

 

The near-antique Montblanc safeties and the later 136-to-139 lines, however are a different matter altogether...


"Every job is good if you do your best and work hard. A man who works hard stinks only to the ones that have nothing to do but smell." Laura Ingalls Wilder

#23 Uncial

Uncial

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,794 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 15:23

Perception is a funny thing. The way some speak of Montblanc here you would swear that every office everywhere must have Montblanc's strewn around like BIC's and fancy sports cars must have them languishing in glove boxes and cup holders. Oddly, perhaps, I have never witnessed this in my entire life in either possible location, but I have seen people who regularly write using them out in the wild without anyone taking a second look at it or ever remarking on it. I use them all the time and I've never had anyone ask me about them. If I take out a Visconti or a Montegrappa, they get plenty of (unwanted) attention.



#24 Wolverine1

Wolverine1

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,537 posts
  • Location:Wolverine-land, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Posted 21 July 2019 - 15:44

I until recently, had 13  MB 149 pens. Sold a few of them to friends recently. So, I must like MB 149s. Well, it is true. I own 2 Pelikan M1000s but, I find the writing experience of the MB 149 the best. Its size, and its feel is what works for me, and so, I write with it whenever I have to write more than a few lines. This pen works for me at all times. I dont care that a different pen might be superior, or may have different or superior material, but, the MB 149 works for me. I dont care about the other models in the MB line, and I just like the MB 49. It is special to me, because it works for my needs. And that is the bottom line, it works for my needs. Your mileage might vary, and you might like another pen. Different strokes for different folks, as thay say.

-Sid



#25 Tas

Tas

    Graphophile . . .

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,851 posts
  • Location:London
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 16:13

I’m not sure why. I’ve never even held one. This post

http://www.fountainp...third-seahorse/

for me, goes a long way to showing how special it must be to own one.

#26 zaddick

zaddick

    BROADside Ambassador

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,674 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 17:49

I'll be succinct: O3B. It is unique among modern offerings and alone is a reason to consider the 149 special.

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!


#27 salmasry

salmasry

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
  • Location:California
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 18:09

 

Just keep an eye on eBay. There always seem to be a variety of 149s between $350-450. The great deals tend to get scooped pretty quickly after they've been listed, so there's some luck involved if you're hoping to get a specific nib grade or era at a certain price. 

 

When buying used... look for good quality pictures. A clean nib, no cracks in the body, no chips in the cap, and a working piston are all it takes to give you a functional 149... Pens aren't that complicated mechanically, there's not much that can be hidden in a high resolution picture.

 

Another benefit the 149 has that many other pens lack is the availability of Montblanc's Service Center. The repair fee can be hefty, but there aren't many pens from 1970 that are still being serviced by their manufacturer (I wouldn't send them push-fit piston or celluloid models, since I think they replace everything with modern parts).

 

 

Montblanc has very conspicuous branding. I totally understand why people don't want to be associated with it. Using a fountain pen is itself a bit of a counterculture affectation, so there's a lot of fun to being "in the know" and having something that is more personally resonant.

 

Thank you, this is some great advice.


Edited by salmasry, 21 July 2019 - 18:21.


#28 salmasry

salmasry

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
  • Location:California
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 18:17

Sounds like it's not for you. It is in essence a writer's pen. People who love them, love them because they are writers pens. Those who buy it for perceived prestige, value and the vain belief that it will make them somehow more desirable, richer or impressive tend to be very disappointed very quickly. 

 

I was actually  counting on this "more impressive/desirable" part     :bunny01:   If  this  pen will not help,  then  forget it. I will buy a sports car instead  ;)



#29 welch

welch

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,870 posts
  • Location:New York, NY
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 18:50

It's not the size of the MB149, but the quality of the nib, feed, filling system, and the care shown in the detailing. I have a 146, and that's what I find. The 149 is so big that I would not want it, but the 146 is about the same size and weight as the PFM and the modern Duofold. My favorite pens, incidentally, are my best dozen of so Parker 51's, but I switch between the PFM and the 146 every month as a carry-around backup with three P-51's. 

 

The 149 is likely to be excellent if it fits your hand. 

 

(But buy one second-hand. Price has grown to about $1000 new, or even more. That's too much for any fountain pen. They are tools for writing. Not jewelry.)


Edited by welch, 21 July 2019 - 18:54.

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500

#30 Beginnersmind0

Beginnersmind0

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 75 posts
  • Location:Baldwin County Alabama
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 18:56

I very much like my 149 at the $350 I paid for it. I like big pens and big nibs, and all the other comparable big pens are just not touchable for my wallet. It is a great writer, and comfortable! I hate the star and its implications. But when the Conid king size, the M1000, a king of pen, or a Nakaya become available at normal people prices, I will get one! I can not see paying retail for for any of these pens.

#31 silverlifter

silverlifter

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 18:58

I still don’t see anything about the intrinsic value of the 149 as a pen that makes it valuable compared to other pens, other than size (combined with the Montblanc endcap).

 

 

Ulitmately, there are many better pens for the price, but none have the brand cachet that MB does amongst the general public.


Vintage. Cursive italic. Iron gall.


#32 salmasry

salmasry

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
  • Location:California
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 19:16

I very much like my 149 at the $350 I paid for it. I like big pens and big nibs, and all the other comparable big pens are just not touchable for my wallet. It is a great writer, and comfortable! I hate the star and its implications. But when the Conid king size, the M1000, a king of pen, or a Nakaya become available at normal people prices, I will get one! I can not see paying retail for for any of these pens.

 

 

As for the M1000,  amazon uk store   sells  the M1000  "B" nib for  $350 on amazon.com. 

Mind u, it is limited to B nib only, other nib are $200 more.

I did not use them nor can I  vouch for them though 


Edited by salmasry, 21 July 2019 - 20:29.


#33 Honeybadgers

Honeybadgers

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,125 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 20:04

The nib is damn pretty and I can't think of a pen with nicer polished plastic.

 

Other than that, nope. Pelikan's m1000 is a little nicer looking, uses real celluloid in the barrel, the nib is softer and just as (if not moreso) pretty, and pelikan's piston is smoother.

 

Mont blanc does do a damn good job in their post sale support, expensive as it is. They can do pretty miraculous things to very, very old pens.

 

It does have the "lightweight enormous pen" thing going for it. Nothing that big with a piston filler is as lightweight, so definitely worth taking that into consideration too.

 

Personally, I find the 149 a great deal as a used pen. People take care of them, so a used 1990's/early 2000's 149 for $500 is genuinely a good pen at that price. But at MSRP, you're just buying a boardroom warrior.


Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)


#34 gyasko

gyasko

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,095 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn NY

Posted 21 July 2019 - 21:25

I like MBs and have a bunch of them. What i like about them are the nibs. You get an MB nib on a 146 just like you do with a 149 and that 146 nib will be just as good as one on a 149. I prefer my 146 nibs, which are a bit softer, but i like the feel of the 149 in my hand. Note that if you're looking for a triple broad, you're going to have to go with a 149.

#35 jvr

jvr

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 July 2019 - 23:46

As for the M1000,  amazon uk store   sells  the M1000  "B" nib for  $350 on amazon.com. 
Mind u, it is limited to B nib only, other nib are $200 more.
I did not use them nor can I  vouch for them though


Endlesspens.com has a preorder sale going on for many Pelikans including the M1000.
No signature. I'm boring that way.

#36 sidthecat

sidthecat

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,968 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Flag:

Posted 22 July 2019 - 00:05

My boss has one from his family, who’s has a nice flex nib, but I look like a five-year-old when I hold it in my little fist. Small-to-tiny ringtops work better with my physical scale.

#37 tubular

tubular

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 73 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 July 2019 - 01:15

 I hate the star and its implications.

 

I thought the star was a representation of the mountain itself.  What implications are you thinking of?



#38 Freddy

Freddy

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,668 posts
  • Location:Gold Coast, NY
  • Flag:

Posted 22 July 2019 - 01:40

Hell if I know....However....I like 'em.......

Ain't so complicated.......Nope...Op doesn't dig 'em...'tis ok....{ Freakin' HappySimileyFaceTimeThingie }

 

  Fred

Say good night Gracie......



#39 stacybean

stacybean

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 308 posts

Posted 22 July 2019 - 03:02

I own a 90’s era 149 with a B nib that is “stub ish ” . I purchased it used from someone here on FPN. It is a absolute delight to write with because of its phenomenal nib. It’s a tactile pleasure whose character is hard to describe or compare with other pens.

#40 Stewiesdad

Stewiesdad

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Silver

  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 July 2019 - 04:05

 
Do you need a pen for it's nib size or for writing?







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: montblanc



Sponsored Content




|