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Triangular Grips?

triangular question

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33 replies to this topic

#21 vicpen123

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 11:46

I have three Parker 75s and, because my grip is high on the section near the barrel, I do not feel the three depressions that are more pronounced approaching the nib when I write.

 

Why have a triangular grip? How does it help?



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#22 inkstainedruth

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 15:10

I have three Parker 75s and, because my grip is high on the section near the barrel, I do not feel the three depressions that are more pronounced approaching the nib when I write.

 

Why have a triangular grip? How does it help?

 

My understanding (at least for lower end "student" pens is that it teaches the correct way to hold the pen so that you're not rolling it in your hand (which means you've got the nib at the right orientation and angle to the paper).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

ETA: I realized that I may not be describing what I mean well -- what I mean is that the triangular grip will teach you to hold the pen so that the nib is in the optimal position (rolling it can lead to poor flow and/or a scratchy writing experience).


Edited by inkstainedruth, 12 July 2019 - 15:12.

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#23 BaronWulfraed

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 15:43

It's a stretch, but the previous generation Vanishing Point might qualify. This is the faceted barrel model that is closer in size to the current Decimo model. The big thing is that it has a one-piece nose-cone/pocket clip, and the transition from nose to clip has flat sides (this is the biggest mistake of current Vanishing Point/Decimo models -- the staked on pocket clip gives an somewhat uncomfortable edge where the fingers fit).



#24 Arkanabar

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 22:17

For a low end pen, have a look at the Jinhao 599.  It's a knockoff of a Safari/al-Star.  Someone gave me one and it taught me that I could in fact get used to a triangular section after all.  Is it as good as my Safari?  No.  But it's also roughly a sixth the price.....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

Echo that.  I dislike the Safari section, and I suggest that if one can't test write with one for a page or so, a Jinhao 599 will tell you for far less than the price of a Safari whether buying a Safari is a mistake for you.



#25 OMASsimo

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 02:36

I think there are simply cultural differences how pens are held as I can tell from my intercontinental family. A triangular section is quite natural for the typical way to hold a pen in Europe. It seems less optimal for the typical way of holding a pen in North America. For me, the triangular 360 feels totally natural because the three sides of an equilateral triangular pen are the natural gripping positions by training since prep school.



#26 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 14:05

Back in the last Depression, I neglected to get a French P-75, which has no triangular grip; good for the classic tripod grip, like the American P-75.

 

I no longer use the tripod, but the 'forefinger up' method of grasping a fountain pen, so the French pen would do me better.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#27 Bibliophage

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 23:08

I'm currently recopying some random notes in a cheap notebook, and I'm using a plastic 599 with triangular grip.   (Well, almost.   Two sides of a triangle, then one side from a Reuleaux Triangle)  

 

The grip I was taught in elementary school with the HUGE pencils is the same grip that I use with the Jinhao, and I've never had a bit of trouble with it.  I will say that the rounded section makes it really fast to reset my grip without having to look at the pen.   That makes it a better writing nail than my Parker Vectors - but the Vector is a straighter, thinner pen. 



#28 peroride

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 00:18

No gripes with grips  ;)

 

I like angled grips and the only pet peeve I have would be too short grip sections.

 

fpn_1563062711__angle_grip_-_edited.jpg

 

Starting top, going clockwise:

  • :P Parker 75 has a molded depressed finger grip, pleasant hold and the nib can be rotated to dial in personal writing preference B) with a special tool or with fingers (though I ripped out the feed section when I first tried to remove the rotator tool :yikes: )
  • :D Pilot Kakuno - hexagrip also surprisingly pleasant 
  • :mellow: Pilot Fermo - like the VPs has that clip that sticks out like a sore thumb but the vertex presents the grip as a triangle of sorts. Not as pleasant as a sided grip but better than no grip at all as the smooth barrel would be less of a hold.
  • :) Lamy Safari - good old reliable Lamy has a hard side grip that is pleasant to hold nonetheless  

 



#29 vicpen123

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 12:11

 

My understanding (at least for lower end "student" pens is that it teaches the correct way to hold the pen so that you're not rolling it in your hand (which means you've got the nib at the right orientation and angle to the paper).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

So many fountain pens do not have a triangular grip and, as I have not heard of any complaints of pens rolling in the hands, I wonder if the triangular grip is not a solution trying to find a problem.

 

How many experienced fountain pen users "roll the pen" and don't find the sweet spot? Legitimate question.



#30 SoulSamurai

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 13:02

So many fountain pens do not have a triangular grip and, as I have not heard of any complaints of pens rolling in the hands, I wonder if the triangular grip is not a solution trying to find a problem.

 

How many experienced fountain pen users "roll the pen" and don't find the sweet spot? Legitimate question.

 

 

I have had issues with pens "squirreling" around in my grip. This happens far more with pens with metal sections, but basically a some grips feel easier to hold while others I feel the need to tighten my grip in order to firmly anchor the pen, leading to hand fatigue.

 

Besides, triangular grips aren't just about pens rolling, some people find them more comfortable.



#31 ardene

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 23:06

I have had issues with pens "squirreling" around in my grip. This happens far more with pens with metal sections, but basically a some grips feel easier to hold while others I feel the need to tighten my grip in order to firmly anchor the pen, leading to hand fatigue.
 
Besides, triangular grips aren't just about pens rolling, some people find them more comfortable.


By squirrelling you mean that the pen rotates around its own axis or around the point you 're holding it from?

#32 SoulSamurai

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 06:27

By squirrelling you mean that the pen rotates around its own axis or around the point you 're holding it from?

 

 

By "squirreling" I mean that the pen doesn't feel firmly anchored in my hand and doesn't seem to move the way I want it to when I try to reposition it. Difficulty achieving and maintaining the correct rotation around the pen's own axis is one of the problems I have faced with some pens. In my case it's mainly thin pens with metal grips (which is why I don't buy that kind of pen anymore), but hey: everyone is different. Some people have less difficulty anchoring pens in the their hands than me, some people probably have more.



#33 ardene

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 14:48

By "squirreling" I mean that the pen doesn't feel firmly anchored in my hand and doesn't seem to move the way I want it to when I try to reposition it. Difficulty achieving and maintaining the correct rotation around the pen's own axis is one of the problems I have faced with some pens. In my case it's mainly thin pens with metal grips (which is why I don't buy that kind of pen anymore), but hey: everyone is different. Some people have less difficulty anchoring pens in the their hands than me, some people probably have more.


Thanks for the clarification. Of course everyone is different. I asked out of mere curiosity. An idea would be not to apply any pressure at all when you write, but I suppose you would have tried that.

#34 MollyH

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 01:59

I have three Parker 75s and, because my grip is high on the section near the barrel, I do not feel the three depressions that are more pronounced approaching the nib when I write.
 
Why have a triangular grip? How does it help?


My friend has some physical issues with her hand that can make it painful to hold pens for a longer time, so the triangular grip is ergodynamic for her.





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