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Jinhao And Flex?

flex experiment jinhao

3 replies to this topic

#1 Thy

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 01:17

Well... Jinhao 159, with a generic Jinhao nib.

Screenshot_2019-07-08_at_6.15.22_PM.png

Okay. That top line is disgusting, but I made my Jinhao nib flex. Yes, it is prone to springing the nib if brought too far, but so far, the modifications on the nib are looking okay. The middle line is it's "average" flex (without any risk). The bottom lines however.... that's a whole different story. Right next to it, I compared the flex to a Canadian Parker Vacumatic. 1 millimeter to 2.5 millimeter flex average. The really crazy ones go up to 3 millimeters.


Edited by Thy, 09 July 2019 - 01:20.


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#2 Thy

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 07:24

What I did was I bent my nib slightly in several directions.Here is a reference. 

 Screenshot_2019-07-09_at_12.15.51_AM.png

The front portion of the nib is bent upwards, while the lower portion is bent downwards. This causes the front portion to be smoother and adjust well to the pressure exerted from flexing the nib, while the bend downwards prevent springing when flexing, to a degree. Although this was pretty easy, the hours spent tuning the nib was a massive pain, especially with this particular nib. The reason I chose to risk this nib was not only because it was a cheap Jinhao nib, it also had baby's bottom and also released too much ink, to which I chose to fix in this unorthodox manner, as shown above.Screenshot_2019-07-09-00-22-08.png?width- a picture of it's flex, you can see the massive amounts of ink released on the side.


Edited by Thy, 09 July 2019 - 07:26.


#3 Honeybadgers

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 02:22

I use jinhao nibs as the base for my custom flex nibs. I extend the main slit down to the middle of the H on jinhao and cross slit at the breather, then two relief cuts in to the first inner line on the scrollwork from the shoulders, and it flexes like MAD.


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#4 Thy

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 05:44

I use jinhao nibs as the base for my custom flex nibs. I extend the main slit down to the middle of the H on jinhao and cross slit at the breather, then two relief cuts in to the first inner line on the scrollwork from the shoulders, and it flexes like MAD.

Wow really? Do you have a picture? I would love to see it!





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