Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Sonnet Drying Out Problem

sonnet 1994 drying out

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 PeterR-C

PeterR-C

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 24 June 2019 - 08:59

I have a number of 1994 Sonnets, which I love. But they tend to dry out overnight, and in some cases an ink cartridge only a couple of weeks old and hardly used has evaporated almost completely. It seems this is a problem lots of people have had. I have read various ideas for solutions on the FPN, and this request is to ask which solution is best. Am I right that it is due to the ventilation holes in the end of the cap being too large?

 

I have seen the suggestion that dripping candle wax into the inside of the cap can seal the holes. This seems straightforward but I do a fair amount of work in tropical climates and I'm a bit worried about the wax melting. Liquid epoxy has been suggested but wouldn't this be irreversible? Or does that not matter? Or would shellac do the trick?

 

If anyone has experience of these or any other methods, please enlighten me!



Sponsored Content

#2 RoyalBear

RoyalBear

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 572 posts
  • Location:Garland County, Arkansas, U.S. of A.
  • Flag:

Posted 25 June 2019 - 08:21

I read your thread and was quite surprised about your experience. I too have a number of Sonnets and have never experienced the problem that you are having. Mine range from 1993 to 2014.



#3 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,340 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 25 June 2019 - 15:06

I have Sonnets made from the early 1990s to about 2007.  Every last one dried out overnight or sooner.  I have been solving this in some cases by popping off the cap jewel, dripping some five minute set time epoxy into the recess where the cap jewel sits and reinserting the cap jewel with the prong going into the hole.  This has worked on the five Sonnets I did it to.  It is probably going to be difficult to impossible to reverse this.  This is why I am taking my time about doing the rest of the Sonnets.  I want to use the five longer term to see how this holds up.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#4 mana

mana

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,062 posts
  • Location:Helsinki, Finland
  • Flag:

Posted 25 June 2019 - 15:14

Re: drying problems. IIRC that it is due to a faulty inner cap design which has led some of them to crack and thus lose the ability to seal the nib properly. The airholes actually run around and outside of the inner cap. I did manage to mitigate that problem in part by a liberal application of hot candle wax. Not pretty though and you have to make sure that none of that candle wax goes inside the inner cap (I for one do not fancy cleaning the nib of that).


Adopt, Don't Shop! Support Your Local Animal Shelters! - Let's make this world a better place together! Because... now is the only thing that is real...

"Indifference towards people and the reality in which they live is actually the one and only cardinal sin in design." - Dieter Rams
 

EDC: Post WWII green binde Pelikan 100N CI 14K B, post WWII black binde 100N 14K EEF, 400 Tortoise CI 14K BB. INKED: early 70s LAMY 2000 MK, Parker 51 Aerometric F & M, rOtring Art Pen 1.1 & 1.5 mm CI & Woodshed Pen Co. Red swirl 1.1 mm CI etc. Inks: Pelikan 4001 BB & Turquoise, vintage Parker Quink & Lamy Turquoise. Also, my own mixes. Desk pen: Black Pelikan 500NN with a 14K M-nib in a bakelite Pelikan pen holder.


#5 SenZen

SenZen

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,710 posts

Posted 25 June 2019 - 15:14

I keep my two Sonnets in boxes, even when I write with them I put them back if not using them immediately. Pajaro's solution seems the right one, I would just be weary of mangling the cap jewels: I am talking about my own clumsiness, not their physical properties.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#6 ngekomo

ngekomo

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 25 June 2019 - 17:11

I think you should try non permanent method first such as wax

wax can be removed with hot water, hot water will melt wax and wax will float

 

maybe try put a roll of paper in the cap and drop a few candle wax, it would land directly to the center of the cap right around the rivet (or whatever round hole thing in there)



#7 SenZen

SenZen

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,710 posts

Posted 26 June 2019 - 14:49

I think you should try non permanent method first such as wax

wax can be removed with hot water, hot water will melt wax and wax will float

 

maybe try put a roll of paper in the cap and drop a few candle wax, it would land directly to the center of the cap right around the rivet (or whatever round hole thing in there)

 

I did that, didn't help much, there's a hole under the clip, where it meets the crown...


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#8 PeterR-C

PeterR-C

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 27 June 2019 - 11:28

Thanks to you all for your comments. I'll have a go with ngekomo's wax idea first, but for a long-term solution I'm inclined to try Pajaro's 5 minute epoxy solution. If it works, I won't be wanting to remove the cap jewel again, so I don't mind it being permanent.

 

But like Pseudo88 I am uncertain how to remove the cap jewel without marking it, I haven't tried this before. What's the best way to do it?



#9 hari317

hari317

    Classic

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,594 posts
  • Location:Mumbai, INDIA
  • Flag:

Posted 27 June 2019 - 12:05

I have had good results with the wax technique. I took a small glass beaker, chopped a medium sized wax candle into it and placed this beaker in the centre of a shallow pan filled with water. Heat the pan over an electric heater. the wax will melt nicely and become liquid. quickly dip just the clip jewel end of the cap into the molten wax, dwell for 3-5seconds and withdraw. Wipe clean the excess wax with a clean cotton rag. Run the rag under the clip as well to wipe away excess wax.

 

Do the suction test to check air-tightness. in fact do this before the wax treatment too, you will know if the wax was useful.    


In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#10 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,340 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 27 June 2019 - 20:55

Thanks to you all for your comments. I'll have a go with ngekomo's wax idea first, but for a long-term solution I'm inclined to try Pajaro's 5 minute epoxy solution. If it works, I won't be wanting to remove the cap jewel again, so I don't mind it being permanent.
 
But like Pseudo88 I am uncertain how to remove the cap jewel without marking it, I haven't tried this before. What's the best way to do it?

 

To remove the cap jewel I used the blade of a pen knife size Swiss Army knife to slide the blade under the jewel and turn it sideways, which flipped the jewel right out without harming. You could always use something else that is thin, firm and less sharp.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#11 Ron Z

Ron Z

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,247 posts

Posted 28 June 2019 - 17:43

The cap vent goes through the top of the cap, and around the outside of the inner cap.  You want to preserve this if possible so that ink is not pulled out of the feed as you take the cap off.

 

The nib dries out because the inner cap often cracks at the top end when riveted, allowing air into the inner cap.  If you look down into the inner cap with a focused LED light, you often see cracks in the end of the inner cap.  We repair this by dropping epoxy down in the end of the inner cap to seal cracks..  This fixes the air leak without sealing off the cap vent.


banner200.jpg
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.


#12 pajaro

pajaro

    Amblin along like I had good sense.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,340 posts
  • Location:Tecumseh, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 28 June 2019 - 23:23

Thanks for clarifying that. 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#13 PeterR-C

PeterR-C

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 June 2019 - 11:16

Many thanks for these replies. I'll give both the wax and the epoxy methods a go - I've looked down the caps with an LED and sure enough there are cracks in the small circular part right at the end. I'll report back with an update...



#14 PeterR-C

PeterR-C

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 June 2019 - 17:41

And a follow-up question: I'm not sure what is meant by epoxy. In Britain what is sold as epoxy is glue that comes in two tubes that have to be squeezed and mixed. This produces a goo that is far too sticky to be dropped. Superglue comes in liquid form, is that what I should be using?



#15 torstar

torstar

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,232 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 30 June 2019 - 17:46

I have a number of 1994 Sonnets, which I love. But they tend to dry out overnight, and in some cases an ink cartridge only a couple of weeks old and hardly used has evaporated almost completely. It seems this is a problem lots of people have had. I have read various ideas for solutions on the FPN, and this request is to ask which solution is best. Am I right that it is due to the ventilation holes in the end of the cap being too large?

 

I have seen the suggestion that dripping candle wax into the inside of the cap can seal the holes. This seems straightforward but I do a fair amount of work in tropical climates and I'm a bit worried about the wax melting. Liquid epoxy has been suggested but wouldn't this be irreversible? Or does that not matter? Or would shellac do the trick?

 

If anyone has experience of these or any other methods, please enlighten me!

 

There wasn't one, sent it back a few times before realizing it was a complete lemon, and Parker wasn't going to do a thing to help out.

 

It made a lovely dart off the concrete wall a few times.



#16 Ron Z

Ron Z

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,247 posts

Posted 01 July 2019 - 13:43

Two part epoxy is what you want.   Alradite in the UK?   Never  superglue.  You will need a long stick to get it into the end of the cap.  Even a 5 minute epoxy tends to be "self leveling" when left on a horizontal surface.  Mix it well and quickly get it into the cap end, and keep the cap upright until it sets.  You don't need a big glob of it!

 

 

There wasn't one, sent it back a few times before realizing it was a complete lemon, and Parker wasn't going to do a thing to help out.

 

That was the reissue of the Parker 51.  The barrels on the early runs were made too thin, and cracked quite easily.  Not one of. the best pens made by Parker..


banner200.jpg
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.


#17 PeterR-C

PeterR-C

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 July 2019 - 14:55

Thanks Ron, that's really helpful. Araldite is indeed everywhere. I'll get it done and report back.



#18 torstar

torstar

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,232 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 02 July 2019 - 17:01

Two part epoxy is what you want.   Alradite in the UK?   Never  superglue.  You will need a long stick to get it into the end of the cap.  Even a 5 minute epoxy tends to be "self leveling" when left on a horizontal surface.  Mix it well and quickly get it into the cap end, and keep the cap upright until it sets.  You don't need a big glob of it!

 

 

 

 

 

That was the reissue of the Parker 51.  The barrels on the early runs were made too thin, and cracked quite easily.  Not one of. the best pens made by Parker..

 

no, that was the Sonnet Cisele (SP) a pen costing $300 USD and it was a lemon and they told us we could all basically (bleep) off and die.



#19 Ron Z

Ron Z

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,247 posts

Posted 02 July 2019 - 17:30

no, that was the Sonnet Cisele (SP) a pen costing $300 USD and it was a lemon and they told us we could all basically (bleep) off and die.

 

IIRC, they weren't especially helpful with the modern 51 either.  People are still chasing replacement barrels and nibs.  The best solution I've heard was to use the new cap on a vintage pen.


banner200.jpg
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.


#20 mariom

mariom

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 522 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 04 July 2019 - 01:04

This seems to have been an ongoing problem for a long time. I've had one Sonnet over the years - nice pen to look at, but prone to drying out and a problematic starter when it wasn't dry. Couldn't get rid of it fast enough.

 

I really do fail to see why some people have such a fascination with what appears to be a poorly designed and engineered pen.


Edited by mariom, 04 July 2019 - 01:06.

=====================================
Mario Mirabile
Melbourne, Australia

www.miralightimaging.com

=====================================





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: sonnet, 1994, drying out



Sponsored Content




|