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N.y. 'the Swan Pen' E.d.


11 replies to this topic

#1 PaulS

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:13

date wise possibly c. 1915 - 18 perhaps, but not sure - the model is THE SWAN PEN and shown as made in New York.        The cap carries the No. 4500 and is minus any chasing  -  at the end of the barrel it's stamped '4570 Brd.'  -  I've a feeling the two parts are a mismatch, possibly, as the barrel does have a chased pattern.

 

But it's the nib and internals that are more interesting  ………………   the nib has a metal overfeed channel, which I have seen before, but it's the unusually shaped feed carrying a pull out wire that's a first for me - when fitted it tucks in neatly below the feed almost right up to the section, then pulls out as can be seen.         

Presumably the mechanics of this set up had a specific purpose  -  was it to keep the ink flowing and/or break surface tension of the ink, or might refilling the pen have been carried out by simply removing this component?

thanks for looking.

Attached Images

  • Swan e.d. - 1.JPG
  • Swan e.d. - 2.JPG
  • Swan e.d. - 3.JPG
  • Swan e.d. - 4.JPG


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#2 Cob

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 10:28

That's a nice find.

 

It is known as a plug filler - the idea was to fill the pen via the hole revealed by removal of the plug.  This design was first produced when the company was Mabie Todd & Bard.  The company became Mabie Todd & Co in 1908.

 

I believe that the gold overfeeds were introduced a little later so I would guess that your estimate of the date is pretty good.

 

Lovely stub nib.

 

I have had a couple of these; I have no idea of the purpose of the long wire, but mine worked perfectly, not always the case with eyedroppers!

 

Cob


Edited by Cob, 12 June 2019 - 10:28.

fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#3 PaulS

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 11:06

many thanks for the explanation and details - agree it's a great looking nib, and though I have dip tested as usual, it might be a long time before the pen writes in the real sense.

..................….   and just in case Marlow is watching I don't have any intention of removing the oxidation from this pen. ;)



#4 Cob

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 11:15

It's an eyedropper!  Fill it up and see how you get on...

 

C.


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#5 Marlow

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 11:26

 

many thanks for the explanation and details - agree it's a great looking nib, and though I have dip tested as usual, it might be a long time before the pen writes in the real sense.

..................….   and just in case Marlow is watching I don't have any intention of removing the oxidation from this pen. ;)

 

 

 

haha - just seen this lol. Glad to hear it!

 

Re the wire, isn't it simply a way to break any surface tension in the ink to ensure continuity of flow?


"Do not go gentle into that good night... Rage, rage, against the dying of the light." Dylan Thomas

#6 PaulS

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 12:05

I think you may be correct with that suggestion.



#7 Greenie

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 14:46

The long wire is there to hold the plug when it is pulled out of the way. That way, nothing is removed and set down elsewhere.  

 

fpn_1560350772__swan_plug_feed_4500_ad_c



#8 PaulS

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 15:16

so that's the correct answer - thanks Greenie, much appreciated.             So that advert is dated either 1908 or earlier, and my pen could possibly be a little older than I'd first thought.            IIRC Mr. James Payn was a late Victorian/Edwardian English novelist  -  of whom I'd never heard.



#9 Marlow

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 16:36

Ahh, yes, that makes sense! Just had a root-through and I have a pen with this very feature. :happyberet:


"Do not go gentle into that good night... Rage, rage, against the dying of the light." Dylan Thomas

#10 Greenie

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 03:28

The ad is Mabie Todd & Bard

As Cob pointed out, it became Mabie Todd & Co 1908/1909

You pen has the later name and post dates the ad. But the ad shows the intent of the filler very well. Besides. Old ads are cool. Way better than describing it myself!



#11 PaulS

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 09:04

thanks  -  I'd also overlooked the fact that there are images of early e.d. feed systems in the Marshall & Oldfield 'Pen Repair Manual', including this version with the long double wires and 'plug/bulb' under the feed.        There's also a little information on the dropping of the Bard part of the name.

 

Having now digested the ad a little more, it's intriguing to ponder the success or otherwise of the claims regarding the skilful method of increasing or decreasing the flow of ink, presumably by manipulation of the above plug.      The writing in the ad. isn't clear enough in some places to be able to read clearly, but a very interesting piece of advertising history.    thanks again.


Edited by PaulS, 13 June 2019 - 09:05.


#12 spacecoastpenny

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Posted 16 June 2019 - 19:03

Great pen! Congrats and good luck.


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