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Lamy Broad Nibs And Their Sweet Spots

lamy broad sweetspot

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Arijitdutta

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 01:54

I have a Lamy Safari Fine nib. It writes so so so smooth, but it has a small sweet spot. I am thinking of buying a broad nib, is the sweet spot going to get a bit bigger then?



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#2 Mr.Rene

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 02:12

In my experience steel lamy nibs are better than the black enameled ones..more soft and wet than stiffy black...



#3 fabri00

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 06:23

I have a Lamy Safari Fine nib. It writes so so so smooth, but it has a small sweet spot. I am thinking of buying a broad nib, is the sweet spot going to get a bit bigger then?


yes, in general the sweet spot get bigger as the nib increase.
It should be the same also with Safari.

#4 City74

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 07:30

I have a Safari with a M and an Al Star with a B. I find the B much easier to write with and no worries about a “sweet spot” really. It writes every time. (Btw I’m a lefty but I think for righties it’s the same)

#5 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 11:55

I had a Safari in B that wrote well...(gave it away to hook someone onto fountain pens) ...have a 1.5 Joy with no problems also.

The wider the nib the wider the sweetspot.

 

A new nib costs some $7...the last time i checked which was a few years ago. So one could also afford a M if you find a B too wide. Easy to change nibs everyone says. I've not had a reason to do so, having a slew of pens of various widths and flexes.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#6 surprise123

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 04:12

Unrelated pen, but my Lamy 2000 is THE most picky writer I've ever seen. The medium nib will write like hot butter rolling on hot glass when held the way *I* hold it, but in any other hand, it becomes a needle dragged on the pavement. The reason for that is my unusual unposted higher holding angle. You can visibly see the tipping angle, it has indeed been a hard year for it. Went through 2 bottles of Waterman blue-black within one school year, I'll have to get another one soon, as J. Herbin doesn't seem to like my L2K. Or is it the other way around?



#7 sirgilbert357

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 17:31

Both the medium and broad nibs I have for my Lamy Studio seem to write about the same. The broad just lays down more ink in a wider line, obviously. I haven't noticed a real "sweet spot"...they are just ball tipped nibs after all, I don't think there's as much shaping for these as other nibs. The range of writing angle should be pretty forgiving.



#8 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 22:23

Much....is not much difference between a F & a M or a M & B........There is a big difference between a F & a B.

.....Then you have normal tolerance even with a robot nib making machine, a nib can exactly = a Skinny M or a Fat F.

Fat or Skinny in tolerance may be more common than the 'rare' in the middle of that companies tolerance.

 

With all companies having their own standard and tolerance of that..............the over lap of size is a given.

 

There was and may still be a good reason for that. Once Parker made a wider nib per size than Sheaffer..........in the day of One Man One Pen, and the nib lasting 7-10*** years of constant work, one didn't want someone to make a major mistake and buy a Sheaffer instead of a Parker.

Market Survey's proved Parker users were trained to a wider nib..............if Parker made a Skinny Sheaffer nib...............it could be like a Chevy driver buying a Ford......

 

***Status had something to do with it......every 6-7 years a major company was expected to come out with a new 'modern' flagship, so folks could keep up with the Jones. That of course was back in the Great Days of fountain pens having up to the minute guts.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 10 June 2019 - 22:24.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






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