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Bchr Not Black Anymore


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67 replies to this topic

#61 Marlow

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Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:14

I know of one pen restorer who uses Cherry Blossom Liquid shoe Polish, then buffed by hand and left for 24 hours followed by a spray coat of sealant, a car product that detailers are using instead of wax.

 

I thought that you may like to see an example of a well worn and well loved Sheaffer, you would want to leave that surface just as it is.

 

If that Sheaffer were mine and the wear due to countless extended writing sessions I would absolutely love it just the way it is, as I'm sure you do. My equivalent pen is a Parker 45 flighter I've been using for nearly 40 years and it barely shows any marks at all. Yours looks way better!


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#62 Dr.X

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Posted 26 July 2019 - 13:52

 

At least a year post procedure, probably more, but I don´t remember exactly, and no, they haven´t been handled much.

 

That's awesome. Thank you!

 

I'm actually more interested in the hydrogen peroxide. Not looking to add dye/color, rather to remove the oxidized layer in a less destructive fashion to the chasing than the current method I use, which is micromesh. And yes, I do have pens that I keep original - brown/green, blotchy ... beautifully aged to perfection. 

 

Many thanks for sharing your method.

 

Nick



#63 PaulS

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Posted 26 July 2019 - 15:55

Assume the Sheaffer is a lacquer over brass pen, so a very different situation from the BHR pens we've been discussing.         Short of buying a new barrel, then probably nothing you can do about lacquer finishes - even if you wanted to. :)



#64 Pen_Padawan

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 01:55

Dear All, thank you for all the great solutions, much appreciated. From the chemical solutions to the micro mesh I would think the pens would need to be bare BHR with out any metal rings and clips. I have included photos of my pens that started this question. As you can see several have metal rings. So my question before starting any of the procedures; do all the metal parts need to be removed? Or is it just easier to work on them with the metal removed? Removal of all the metal rings and clips would be a whole other issue. Thanks again.

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#65 Wahl

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 17:33

I didn´t remove any metal rings on the one I worked on, and they don´t seem to be affected.



#66 Beechwood

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 03:26

https://www.amazon.c...65752923&sr=1-2

 

I think I would mask the metaware with some strong adhesive tape such as this, polish and prepare the metals first before you introduce any process, you may not want to do that after you have blackened the pens. If you are using any strong polishing think about how you are going to deal with any embossing on the pen.

 

I hope that you will be able to show us the results, I am interested in seeing what happens.


Edited by Beechwood, 14 August 2019 - 08:15.

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#67 eckiethump

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 09:21

https://www.amazon.c...65752923&sr=1-2

 

I think I would mask the metaware with some strong adhesive tape such as this, polish and prepare the metals first before you introduce any process, you may not want to do that after you have blackened the pens. If you are using any strong polishing think about how you are going to deal with any embossing on the pen.

 

I hope that you will be able to show us the results, I am interested in seeing what happens.

That's what I use to protect barrel imprints and gold filed parts, when aggressively polishing smooth pens to a finish, it has many uses in pen repair work.


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#68 siamackz

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 10:57

Most recent project - restoring an MB compressor. I am still sourcing the correct nib, but I started working on the body... First I had to remove remnants of the black dye used earlier which was peeling off. Hoover's chemical did well. 

fpn_1569149662__img_7270.jpg


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