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Would Love Your Opinion On The Price For Couple Vintage Parker 45

parker 45 parker flighter vintage

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#1 Remiak

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 05:00

I would like an opinion about the prices for a couple used Parker 45 Flighter Deluxe I found someone selling. Would you buy?

 

The first Parker 45 Flighter Deluxe is a 1960's vintage (black endcap) it looks very good, some signs of use but no deep scratches, pictures are not clear enough to notice small details. He wants $12 for this one.

 

pluma-fuente-parker-flighter-45-colecciopluma-fuente-parker-flighter-45-colecciopluma-fuente-parker-flighter-45-colecciopluma-fuente-parker-flighter-45-coleccio

 

 

This Parker 45 Flighter Deluxe is a 1970's vintage (gold endcap) clear pictures of it, it looks like it is in excellent condition, no scratches and very minimal wear and tear, barely used or well taken care of, it includes the original Parker pen case. He wants $17 for this one.

 

pluma-fuente-parker-45-de-coleccion-D_NQpluma-fuente-parker-45-de-coleccion-D_NQpluma-fuente-parker-45-de-coleccion-D_NQpluma-fuente-parker-45-de-coleccion-D_NQ

 

 

And honorable mention (because I don't think I want this one, but if you guys tell me to grab it I will for the heck of it and gift it to someone) Parker 45 GT (I think) has a navy gray body and a metal cap with gold trims, clear pictures on it and it looks ok, there are many scratches and details everywhere but nothing too terrible. He wants $10.

 

pluma-fuente-parker-D_NQ_NP_607930-MLV29pluma-fuente-parker-D_NQ_NP_941654-MLV29pluma-fuente-parker-D_NQ_NP_749640-MLV29pluma-fuente-parker-D_NQ_NP_624845-MLV29pluma-fuente-parker-D_NQ_NP_967557-MLV29

 

What do you guys think? Should I buy?

 

Seller is local BTW, so they won't do international shipping, I would share contact information otherwise.


Edited by Remiak, 08 May 2019 - 06:02.


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#2 FarmBoy

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 05:27

I would.
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#3 PaulS

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 07:52

so would I  -  most people here have a few, and some have vastly more than a few - it's become quite a cult pen, especially those with the less than common livery.        Produced in vast numbers  for well over forty years and one of the most successful of f.pns. with few genuine critics - though occasionally the hood shrinks which makes for a rippled surface which is possibly the most irritating fault on 45s.       Has big advantage in that nib/feed unscrews so you can vary the point size.

What else can you get these days for a few dollars that will last you some years, and if you only want to write with these things then the cosmetics are not so important.


Edited by PaulS, 08 May 2019 - 09:02.


#4 vicpen123

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 08:07

+1 for all three. $39 for the lot means you can't lose.



#5 OCArt

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 10:03

Those are very good prices, I'd buy all three.  P45's are very trouble free and as previously stated the nibs are easily replaced.  Just give them a good soak to clean the old dried ink out of the collector.



#6 parkergeo

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 10:58

Yes, absolutely consider buying the lot. Those are prices that some people ask just for the vintage squeeze converters that often come with P45s...The goldtail and blacktail flighters are attractive and collectible pens, and the GT with a gold nib would likely be a nice everyday writer.  You could easily swap the nibs between the three however you see fit to use them. 

 

The only thing that might discourage you would be if any of these have significant section shrinkage (a common P45 ailment) but they look to be in fairly good condition in the pictures. 



#7 FarmBoy

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 13:47

There should be nothing that discourages the purchase at the quoted prices.
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#8 majorworks

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 15:13

Looks like a pretty good deal to me. I'd grab 'em. 


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#9 terim

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Posted 08 May 2019 - 17:25

These probably have 14k nibs. We sell them restored and adjusted for around $70, so I think you can't lose!


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#10 Remiak

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 00:07

I would.

Good enough for me. XD

 

 

so would I  -  most people here have a few, and some have vastly more than a few - it's become quite a cult pen, especially those with the less than common livery.        Produced in vast numbers  for well over forty years and one of the most successful of f.pns. with few genuine critics - though occasionally the hood shrinks which makes for a rippled surface which is possibly the most irritating fault on 45s.       Has big advantage in that nib/feed unscrews so you can vary the point size.

What else can you get these days for a few dollars that will last you some years, and if you only want to write with these things then the cosmetics are not so important.

 Yeah, you are right. The cosmetics are not massively important since my plans for my collection is to never own a pen I don't use. I think (personal opinion, applies only to myself) it would be a shame to have a perfectly functional pen that gets no use, I'd feel bad.

 

 

+1 for all three. $39 for the lot means you can't lose.

I'll probably pay about $45 in the end, but it is still a good price. They are this cheap because of where I live, $45 is actually 6 months of minimal wages. I can afford it just fine because I freelance but not everyone can just grab these.

 

Those are very good prices, I'd buy all three.  P45's are very trouble free and as previously stated the nibs are easily replaced.  Just give them a good soak to clean the old dried ink out of the collector.

I've never had an aerometric or vacumatic fed fountain pen before. Anything i should have in consideration during inspecting/cleaning/filling?

 

 

Yes, absolutely consider buying the lot. Those are prices that some people ask just for the vintage squeeze converters that often come with P45s...The goldtail and blacktail flighters are attractive and collectible pens, and the GT with a gold nib would likely be a nice everyday writer.  You could easily swap the nibs between the three however you see fit to use them. 

 

The only thing that might discourage you would be if any of these have significant section shrinkage (a common P45 ailment) but they look to be in fairly good condition in the pictures. 

I've read a little about it, the cap stops clamping onto the section because it shrinks, but why does that happen? is there something that causes it?

 

 

There should be nothing that discourages the purchase at the quoted prices.

 

Looks like a pretty good deal to me. I'd grab 'em. 

 Indeed, I'm already buying them as we speak (not a super smooth process here).

These probably have 14k nibs. We sell them restored and adjusted for around $70, so I think you can't lose!

Dang, so i may have literally struck gold here.

 

 

 

Thank you all for your kind comments and information :) , I already am in the process of buying all 3, one of them comes from a different seller (the black endcap) but after some haggle the grand total will be coming up to some $45 (shipping included) for all 3 pens. I'll take better pictures of them and show them here when they arrive (it'll be a couple weeks at least, I believe)



#11 alexwi

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 04:35

Qué lechúo!

 

They're all in pretty decent shape and even if you don't want one or more of them, you're getting the parts, especially the nibs, at an excellent price.

 

The section of the blue one is slightly deformed (at least it seems so from the pictures), which is a pity, but otherwise they're excellent pens.

 

Enjoy!

 

Alex



#12 MalcolmH

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 05:35

Buy them.  :thumbup:



#13 PaulS

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 08:12

quote  .......................  ""it would be a shame to have a perfectly functional pen that gets no use, I'd feel bad."                In that case I feel bad about a thousand times  -  but I do sleep nights :rolleyes: 



#14 pajaro

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 16:47

There should be nothing that discourages the purchase at the quoted prices.

 

If Farmboy says to buy it, it's definitely a good idea.

 

A lot of people like these pens.  I wonder that the prices do not go higher.


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#15 PaulS

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 19:25

forty odd years worth of production - in Oz, U.S.A. and the U.K. - probably contributes substantially to lower than expected prices.       For me the most commonly found Parker - though having said that I've not found one in the wild for a few weeks. 



#16 welch

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 00:25

Great price on all of them. 

 

A P-45 usually goes for about $20 on EBay, give or take about $5. Sure, some sellers think the 45 should sell at $100 because they think it is "vintage", in the same way that a Parker Vacumatic is vintage. Silliness. A brushed-steel 45 should be worth more than a regular 45. 

 

Buy them now. Or yesterday.


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#17 Mangrove Jack

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 16:21

I would if I already did not have too many Parker 45's. Love them all.

#18 Remiak

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 04:51

Unfortunately i haven't been able to communicate (properly, i will turn to phone calls tomorrow, i hate that but i want those pens) with the seller of the second and third pen, but the seller of the first came through with the deal and today I received my very first vintage pen.

 

When I took it out of the box and foam it came in, I immediatly noticed that the finial, the black end-cap was loose. Not out and about in the box, it is still attached, but it felt like a loose screw just spinning and bobbing about in the breeze. You get what you pay for.

 

Instinct immediately whispers" the nib, inspect the nib" and oh my god, I my blood pressure dropped when i saw that sooty nib. It was covered in what I thought at that moment was corrosion of some sort... I was so dissapointed. I tried taking the nib out but the little cap would just not give. Then i looked at my finger and notice a blue spot, you know, normal stuff, I have blue ink and i ink my fingers from time to time but as I dismissed it my brained clicked: "I do NOT have that shade of blue"

 

So i look at my finger again, then the pen... lick my finger and rub the nib. Blue finger. Ok, so it was not rust but really, really old hardened ink. Workable.

 

Step 2 i opened the body to be dissapointed again, no converter. Dang. And do any of my spare converters/cartriges fit? Nope. Double-dang, Won't be writing with it anytime soon anyway, gotta clean it out.

 

A day soaking later, i could still not unscrew the nib (very blue water though), so i heated some water to about 70°c and soaked it for a couple of minutes. The water got very dark blue, a second try at unscrewing the nib is met with success, but the little screw cap wont release the nib, still stuck with gunk. Another couple minutes in the hot water do the trick. Out it comes, what a tiny little nib that is, mother of god.

 

Started cleaning the nib to see if i had in fact struck gold and then i see the inscription: "10k Parker, Made in USA" :D

 

Gold nib indeed, 10k, but it is gold and it is my very first gold nib.

 

There is also some sort of calcification present on the inside of the body and cap, i can remove that with a soft brush and water, other than that the pen is in good condition.

 

I would like some advice on how to remove the feed as i fear it is still blocked with traces of old ink from who-knows-when (pretty sure this pen is from the early 70s), I still get some blue ink from it despite all the soaking. Also, how to fix that wobbly back end cap, which for now i have immobilized by using PVA glue... yeah i know, but it's washable so it works as a temporary solution for my mental health.

 

Pics tomorrow when i'm not so sleepy and tired.



#19 PaulS

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 07:46

the barrel terminal is cosmetic and you can secure with a permanent adhesive, and rather than using hot water, use dry heat from a hair dryer to encourage parts to separate.                It sounds like you have already removed the feed - the part that holds the nib - and the problem is possibly more likely to be solidified ink in the channel of the feed shaft - the prod like extension attached to the rear of the feed.            

Before getting too keen on a complete strip down - re-assemble the pen and install a Parker cartridge  -  any Parker cartridge should fit  -  just to check to what extent, or not, ink flow reaches the nib.        It's possible it may not be as blocked as you think.

If there is less than good ink flow, leave the pen assembled and make up some form of bulb flush which can be attached to the rear of the gripping section and flush using warm water with a little ammonia or detergent.   Hopefully this will help - repeat if necessary.

 

Sometimes the hoods/gripping sections on 45s can shrink, which shows itself as a ripple effect on the outside  -  the pen still works but it's an annoying feature of this model. 



#20 welch

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 15:08

Do as PaulS says, especially his advice to avoid a tear-down below the level of units that were meant to be unscrewed. For example, yes, unscrew the nib-unit, but to not pull the nib out of the unit. It seems you have done that to the nib-unit, but do not do the same to all the other units that unscrew.

 

A Parker 45 will take any Parker converter, from the original squeeze converter to anything currently sold. Through EBay or Amazon, they sell for $5 (USD) or $10.

 

An advantage of the converter is that you can suck in water and blow it out. That, with regular use, keeps the pen from clogging, once youve got it writing, of course.

 

Ah: Parkers use a proprietary converter and cartridge, and have since 1960. The business model, back then, might have been to sell one Parker 45 (it was the original cartridge converter pen) and then sell many cartridges. That was the US model for selling one razor and many blades. There was no "international standard" that any company might have adhered to. It helps us that Parker has kept its same standard.

 

Keep on. It sounds like you are close to having a great fountain pen.


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