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Graf Von Faber-Castell Ink Line - Impressions?

gvfc graf von faber-castell ink

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47 replies to this topic

#41 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 10:32

Over priced.....nice bottle.

I was given a gift card for my B&M or I'd not even thought of buying the 'super expensive' GvFC inks. E25 for 75ml.

 

I looked hard at the ink reviews, and only Moss Green came in question.

I had dipped it....and it was ok....nothing that made me find an empty pen for it.

 

Last week, I put it in a semi-flex KM nib & OF.....and found semi-flex M for the 'new' Dark Green 4001. It was more a question of how did German '50's Kugal nibs write and I have a couple KM's.

Decided it was a good time to try out the Moss Green....and a few seconds later decided to try out the 4001 dark green also.

 

On Rhodia 90g (new) I found Moss Green to be a dark or black green with some lighter shading strokes of green. Slight difference in what letters shaded, when my Geha 790 KM was held high like a ball point or low so the stubbed part fo the nib was flat on the paper.

 

Looking at it a second time, looks better...............light tone change on common 80g copy paper.... more and better shading on Rhodia 90g.

 

Back before I was into M as much as I now am, I bought a 790 marked M on the pen...pre-nib marking. The found out while looking for a M it was really an EF.....sigh. Moss Green is duller, , with just a hair of green shading in semi-flex EF....(No, I do not do Olympic splits with my semi-flex nibs. Semi-flex adds flair to the writing, it is not for fancy lettering.))

I'd say Moss Green looks better in semi-flex M....a wetter nib.

 

What I got to do is find a regular flex in M and F to see how it writes with a less wet nib. Semi-flex is a wetter nib.

Right now I like the 'new' dark green 4001, more. I have some 17- or so greenish inks, and the GvFC does not make me jump up and down.  Have to find the proper nib for it.

 

I can live with the new 4001....I was one of the minority that liked the old Brilliant Green, in it was the ink that started me into greens, buying 14 bottles within a year,  and as a green-green ink wasn't too bad....came in a close third to R&K Verdura and the now too expensive MB Irish Green at E19...R&K still under E9....8.50 I think.

MB does have to catch up with the Jones...$$$....GvFC and CdA, so have jacked their price way over inflation.

Luckily we live in the Golden Age of Inks....and the 'new' Polish inks seem well liked and affordable.

 

Luckily I have still a bottle of Brilliant Green...and when that is out, R&K Verdura is a tad better as a shading green-green ink than the old Pelikan Brilliant Green ink.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


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#42 NeverTapOut

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 01:08

I saw a really nice writing sample of GVFC Colbalt Blue.

What are the characteristics and how would it be coming from a XXF, XF, F, or PO Nibs?

Also how easy is it to clean out of a MB149...will it stain the windows?

I tried Violet Blue and was not impressed. Will Colbalt Blue have "some" water resistance as well?

Regards,

David


Edited by Jesus1, 24 April 2019 - 01:10.


#43 Intensity

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Posted 15 November 2019 - 01:09

My first three Graf von Faber-Castell inks arrived today and I'm so in love.  I had deliberated about buying them for a long time, looked at sample writing, asked questions, just was not sure (especially after very underwhelming first impression from Deep Sea Green I got in cartridges for a trip).  Well I'm really glad I've finally gotten a few of those inks, and I see more on the horizon.

 

Moss Green - absolutely gorgeous dark green, saturated but still with some gentle shading, fairly neutral green, maybe a tad on the blue side.  Makes me think of tall ferns and shady jungle forests.  I don't own any other greens that are not olive-tinted (Sailor Tokiwa Matsu and more olive from there); this is the first true green I actually wanted and feels like a final stop before I even began looking.  It's currently in a Pelikan M101N with a medium nib that was ground to almost formal italic by Richard Binder at a recent pen show.  Perfect match.

 

Hazelnut Brown - wow!  I've probably read all the reviews of that ink to date, but I was not prepared for what I saw in person.  I expected a rather matte, saturated reddish brown with lower shading.  I loaded it in a very broad, juicy cursive italic pen (customized Pelikan M800 IB nib that is now a crisp cursive italic).  What I see is much more complex than reviews illustrated.  It actually has some great shading and slight hue variation between lighter and darker parts, and there is beautiful dark edge outlining effect that's also slightly sheening.  I can see outlining on both Fabriano Bioprima Italian paper and on all the Japanese papers I've tried it on.  It is a red-tinted warm brown, but not too red.  Just right to me, as I prefer red-leaning browns.  My top brown now, together with J. Herbin Lie de The.

 

Deep Sea Green.  I decided to give it another chance, as it just stayed on my mind, periodically calling my name.  Not as impressed with this one compared to the first two inks, but I might need to try it in a different pen.  Part of the problem is that it was upstaged by Pelikan Edelstein Aquamarine that's my current love in the translucent tealy-blue-gray category.  Deep Sea Green is more gray and muted than Aquamarine.  It has a look of vintage blue black. J. Herbin Vert de Gris is very similar to Deep Sea Green--on some papers they look nearly identical  Vert de Gris has a more matte finish and a bit more of a murky tint.  Another ink that looks quite similar to Deep Sea Green is surprisingly Iroshizuku Syo-Ro.  Syo-Ro has some more saturation and hints of red-magenta sheen but dries to fairly similar look if a wet writer is used with Deep Sea Green.

 

I almost got Stone Gray and Cobalt Blue.


“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 


#44 Pensei

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Posted 16 November 2019 - 18:36

Stone Grey is in my ink hall of fame both for performance and beauty. It's just a great ink, and does not show itself fully in photographs, which I guess is true with many standout inks. The various other colors are just fine, too, but on par with the other premier brands. And, as someone noted above, it's as if the accounting department at GvFC was on vacation when they priced their cartridges. I keep expecting them to triple the price, but until then, it's a great way to try all their colors without a second mortgage. I do love those bottles, though. 



#45 MHBru

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Posted 16 November 2019 - 21:55

Hazelnut brown is my only brown and I love the richness of the color without it looking too red or yellow. My only other GvFC ink is Viper Green and am surprised not to see it mentioned here. Its perfect in my Nakaya heki tamenuri.

#46 mannschott

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Posted 16 November 2019 - 22:26

I have: Hazelnut Brown, Moss Green, Deep Sea Green, Cobalt Blue, and Burned Orange.
I find them all dry and prone to causing pens that generally behave well with other inks to skip the initial strokes of letters when I write. This is maddening. Deep Sea Green is the worst offender, while Burned Orange is better than the rest in my experience.
I love doing ink washes with Deep Sea Green, but find it unpleasant to write with and pale in all but my wettest pens. I am currently using it in a Noodlers Tripletail, which has a flow just barely more controlled than knocking over an ink bottle, to write some letters. In a such a wet pen the color and shading are quite fetching, but the hard starting makes me grind my teeth.
As to them being Dokumentenecht, the full Text on their web site [1] promises more than it delivers, but it does at least seem resistant to (dry) smearing and generally leaves a visible line (and a colorful mess) when made wet. Cobalt Blue is the most fun of the bunch as the waterproof fraction of the ink is bright pink, while the fraction that washes away is cyan. I have not tested resistance to fading from light.

[1] Als dokumentenecht wird eine Tinte bezeichnet, wenn sie wischbeständig, reproduzierbar, lichtecht und wasserfest ist, nicht ausradiert werden kann und resistent gegen viele Chemikalien und Lösungsmittel ist.
~~> Dokumentenecht means it resists smearing, can be copied, does not fade by light, is waterproof, cant be erased, and resists many chemicals and solvents.

Edited by mannschott, 16 November 2019 - 22:31.


#47 Intensity

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Posted 16 November 2019 - 22:57

I'm with you on the whole ISO compliance marketing thing, but it is what it is :( 

 

Interestingly, while I agree that Deep Sea Green is super dry and on the pale side, I've not had any flow interruption or hard start issues with that ink, either in cartridges or in normal fills.  Currently I have it in a vintage Sheaffer Balance (lever-filled sac), which provides good flow.


“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 


#48 NeverTapOut

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Posted 18 November 2019 - 08:52

I like how they expanded their lineup. 75ml for $30 compared to MontBlanc 50ml for $24.

There is about 6 colors I am interested in and any slight water resistance is an added bonus.

How would you compare the flow to MontBlanc and are they easy to clean out of piston fillers.

Cost per ml is less that MontBlanc. I'm sick of Royal Blue and Midnight Blue.. MB write fairly well on cheap copy paper.

How does GVFC compare on cheap copy paper.

Regards,

David







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